Introducing Machine Learning Security Principles

Are you a manager, researcher, or novice data scientist who works with data regularly, yet can’t really understand the technobabble found in security books that are supposed to help you secure the data you work with? Machine Learning Security Principles is all about providing you with full disclosure of all of the security threats that can affect your data in a detailed way that is also understandable. The idea is to understand the threats and understand the players in the security arena so you can create a strategy that will ensure your data remains safe without feeling completely lost in the language used by most books today.

Machine Learning Security Principles looks at data from every possible perspective, which means that you’ll learn more than just collection and storage methods. It isn’t just the hackers and disgruntled employees that are the problem. You now have to deal with governments that tell you how to collect data properly and face the wrath of the pubic at large when the data is collected in a less than ethical manner, even when no laws have been broken. In addition, it’s more than just the data, it’s also the system that holds the data, the application the uses the data, and the users who enter the data that can become problematic. With this in mind, here are some things that you’ll learn when reading this book:

  • Learn methods to prevent illegal access to your system.
  • Discover detection methods when access does occur.
  • Employ machine learning techniques to determine motivations.
  • Mitigate hacker access using a variety of methods.
  • Repair damage to your data and applications.
  • Use ethical data collection methods to reduce security risks.

A major complaint with most books on the market is that there is an expectation that you’re not only an expert coder, but that all you want is to see code. That’s fine if you’re already a seasoned security expert, but then seasoned security experts really don’t need books like this one. Machine Learning Security Principles provides you with several ways to learn about security issues:

  • References to actual security break-ins and the results of them.
  • Block diagrams showing how various kinds of security issues occur.
  • Explanatory text that helps you understand what precisely can happen and how to prevent.
  • Example code that you can use to discover how various security techniques work.
  • Example data and the techniques you can use to work with it.
  • Resources that you can use to augment your security plan.
  • Online tools you can use to more fully explore security issues.

In short, Machine Learning Security Principles provides you with several methods of learning about security in an easy to use manner. It doesn’t take a one size fits all approach. Please let me know if you have any questions about my new book by contacting me at [email protected].

C++ All-in-One for Dummies Errata on Page 188

There is a mistake on page 188 of C++ All-in-One for Dummies, 4th Edition that is based on a supposed April Fool’s prank that was actually initiated on March 26, 2018 (see https://www.modernescpp.com/index.php/no-new-new) and spread throughout the Internet to sites such as: https://www.fluentcpp.com/2018/04/01/cpp-will-no-longer-have-pointers/.  The problem with pranks, especially pranks that linger because the people who perpetuate them haven’t removed them, is that other people tend to believe them, as in this post: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/59820879/are-new-and-delete-getting-deprecated-in-c#. Later, much later, as in the note on the Fluent C++ site, people admit that it was a joke, but still leave the errant material in place.

 After I had discovered that this information was a joke, I had meant to remove two sentences from the book, but somehow they stayed intact.  The two sentences in question appear in the “Understanding the Changes in Pointers for C++ 20” section:

Readers who already know something about pointers need to be aware of the changes in pointers for C++ 20, which is why it appears first. The essential thing to remember as you move to C++ 20 (where new is deprecated) and then to C++ 23 (where new is removed) is that pointers are going to change.

If you find any other references in the book that state that new is deprecated or removed, they too will be modified or eliminated during the next printing. I apologize for any problems that the error has caused, especially to readers who are new to C++, and have submitted an errata to the publisher so that the error is fixed during the next printing. If you have any questions at all about the book, please contact me at [email protected].

Completed! Book Drawing for C++ All-in-One for Dummies, 4th Edition

Five people now have a copy of C++ All-in-One for Dummies, 4th Edition coming their way. Please wait four to six weeks for delivery and let me know when you receive your book. These people are:

  • Eva Beattie
  • Thomas McQuillan
  • Michael Flores
  • Syam Poolla
  • Tom Taylor

I hope that each of you enjoys the book and will provide a review of it on Amazon. Thank you for your support, it’s really important to me. Your reviews will help other readers as well. If you have any questions at all about the book, please contact me at [email protected].

Book Drawing for C++ All-in-One for Dummies, 4th Edition

I’ve just released a new book, C++ All-in-One for Dummies, 4th Edition, and I’d love to give five people in the US a chance to read it for free (I can’t accept requests from other countries due to the amount of postage required to send a book to you). There’s only one catch. In exchange for the free book, I’d appreciate your review of it on Amazon.com. Your reviews are important because they give other people some idea of what the book is like outside of my opinion of it.

This new edition contains an amazing amount of changes from the 3rd Edition, many of which you requested. Of course, I started by updating everything, so you see the latest version of Code::Blocks used in this book. Working with Code::Blocks makes C++ coding a lot easier, but Code::Blocks tends not to hide the details or add any odd background code like some IDEs do. In addition to the updates, you can expect to see these changes:

  • Instructions on how to use your mobile device to write C++ code.
  • Updates on how to work with for loops.
  • Using functional programming techniques.
  • Employing new operators, such as the spaceship operator.
  • Understanding modifications to the Standard Library.

This new edition of the book comes in at a whopping 912 pages, so there is no expectation that you’ll read it cover-to-cover. What I would appreciate is your honest viewpoint on the topics that appeal to you most. If you’d like to participate in this drawing, please contact me at [email protected] by 8 March 2021 by email with a subject of “C++ Book Drawing”. I need your name and address. I’ll post the winners of the contest (sans email addresses) in a future blog post.