WebM Replacing the Animated GIF?

There is always some new technology out there trying to replace the reigning king (or queen). The Graphic Interchange Format (GIF) has a colorful history, but is mainly used today for animated GIFs—those short sequences of animation that you see spread throughout the Internet (and many intranets as well). In fact, you can find animated GIF generators, free animated GIF libraries, and tools for working with animated GIFs by the score. It’s hard to believe that anyone has found uses for even a small portion of the resources out there.

Web Media (WebM) is a technology that is designed to work like an animated GIF, but provide significantly more functionality. It’s an open source project that will supposedly replace the aging animated GIF at some point. A recent articled entitled, “GIF is Dead; Long Live WebM” explains the technical details of why this file format is so superior and why developers desperately need to embrace it. (Read “What Is WebM, and Can It Dethrone the GIF?” if you want a simpler explanation.) After reviewing everything I can online, I have to agree that WebM does, in fact, have a lot to offer. Most importantly, it can support longer animation sequences. The additional colors it supports are nice to have, but it’s the long animation sequences that will ultimately sell this technology to those who need it.

Unfortunately, WebM also has a lot of hype surrounding it. Advocates would have you believe that wholesale replacement of animated GIFs is imminent. The animated GIF won’t be going anywhere anytime soon. In fact, here are some reasons that animated GIFs will stick around for at least next several years:

  • Not every browser supports WebM natively. Only newer versions of Mozilla Firefox, Opera, and Google Chrome support it. Even though Chrome is currently the most used browser out there, it doesn’t quite have enough market share to fully control the market (not that market share alone is a good reason to adopt any technology).
  • There is a huge base of site that already use animated GIFs to good effect and it’s doubtful that the developers of those sites will make a change without a really good reason for doing so.
  • Animated GIFs enjoy a huge support base in free predefined graphics, free tools, and free support. There isn’t a strong monetary need for a new technology.
  • WebM is viewed as more complicated to embed in a Web page.
  • The tools for working with WebM aren’t nearly as easy to use as those that developers can use with animated GIFs.

The question of whether WebM will eventually replace the animated GIF isn’t answerable at this point. The technology is too new, not enough browsers support it, and the tools required to work with it still need a lot of polishing. Until WebM builds enough of a presence online and a backlog of free graphics for developers to use, you can be sure that developers will stick with what they know.

Upgrades really are nice. New technology can provide developers with useful advantages over what has come before. However, without a compelling reason to use WebM, you can be sure adoption will be slow. Without major improvements in support and reduction in complexity, developers will be reticent to make the move and WebM could end up being just one more good idea that didn’t quite make it. Tell me your thoughts about WebM at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.