Some Interesting Windows 8 Information

I constantly track information for my books because I like to keep readers informed about changes when I can. Even though Windows 8 for Dummies Quick Reference appeared in print not long ago, there have been some interesting developments about the operating system it supports. Of course, the least newsworthy development has been the relatively slow adoption of the new operating system. A number of industry pundits are saying that Windows 8 is another Vista, or possibly worse. Statistics have never impressed me very much. Windows 8 will either succeed or it won’t, but it really is too early to tell.

The most interesting piece of information is that people aren’t actually using the much touted Windows 8 touch interface. People are actually buying the least expensive laptops possible to run Windows 8—devices that lack any sort of touch capability. This bit of information has taken me by surprise because Windows 8 really does appear to need a touch interface to work correctly. That said, Windows 8 for Dummies Quick Reference does include a considerable array of keyboard and mouse techniques because I had expected desktop users who upgraded to become completely lost without this information. It may turn out that the additional information helps a lot more than current desktop users based on what the press is saying.

It also appears that you may have an interesting time downgrading your Windows 8 installation to Windows 7, even though Microsoft tells you that you’re legally able to do so. The problem seems to be one of finding the copy of Windows 7 to use for the downgrade. The vendor who supplies the copy of Windows 8 with a system is supposed to provide the copy of Windows 7 to you, but the real world reality is that the vendor often doesn’t do so. The other problem is one of licensing. Microsoft constantly changes its licensing and uses terminology that even a lawyer can’t understand (much less us mere mortals). Trying to figure out whether you’re actually able to downgrade your copy of Windows 8 to Windows 7 can prove daunting. Microsoft has recently provided a clearer set of rules as part of a downloadable whitepaper that you can use to determine your rights.

I’d love to hear about your experiences using Windows 8. In addition, it would be useful to hear from people who have downgraded their copy to Windows 7 and why they made the change. Tell me about the Windows 8 coverage in my book and whether you need additional help with Windows 8 to make the book useful at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. Windows 8 has truly turned into a surprising update; one that may require some additional posts to my blogs to provide good book support.