A Windows Security Alert, Courtesy of Samsung

I’ve gotten used to a whole lot of silly vendor tricks over the years. Just about every vendor I’ve worked with has done something completely idiotic, just to cause the other guy woe. The user always ends up hurt. Readers of Administering Windows Server 2008 Server Core, Microsoft Windows Command Line Administration Instant Reference, and Windows 8 for Dummies Quick Reference need to be aware that according to a ComputerWorld article, Samsung has turned off Windows Update. The worrisome part of all this is that there is apparently an executable to turn the support off, but not another executable to turn support back on. Sites, such as engadget, are recommending you perform a clean install of Windows on your computer to get rid of the problem.

The whole issue seems to revolve around Samsung being worried that Microsoft’s updates will interfere with Samsung’s updates of its software. The result could be that the system won’t work. Phrases, such as “could be” and “might not”, always bother me. Samsung must not have tested the problem fully or they would have had a more positive and straightforward comment to make when asked about the problem. The point is that the user loses. Advice such as telling users they must reinstall Windows from scratch to get rid of the problem sounds just dandy until you figure out that most users can’t perform this task, so they’ll be out extra money getting someone else to do the job or we’ll all face the issues that happen when updates don’t occur. It’s not as if the Internet really requires yet more zombies (computers under hacker control)—we have no lack of them now.

A similar problem occurred not long ago when Lenovo thought it would be a good idea to pre-install the Superfish adware on the computers it put out. Most computer vendors add bloatware to their systems, which really does make it a good idea to perform a clean install when you buy a new system, but purposely adding adware seems a bit deranged to me. Lenovo later apologized and fixed the problem, but the point is that they made the mistake in the first place.

Some of my readers have asked why so many of my books include installation instructions or at least pointers to the installation instructions. The answer is that vendors keep doing things that make me shake my head and wonder just what they were thinking about. When you buy a new system from someone, perform a clean install of the operating system to get rid of the bloatware or have someone else do it for you. If you choose to keep the pre-installed operating system in place, make sure you research any oddities of the installation (such as turning off Windows Update). Otherwise, you might end up with a situation where Windows Update simply doesn’t do the job because someone told it not to. Let me know your thoughts on pre-installed software, bloatware, and vendors who seem completely clueless at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.


Story Update!

According to a ComputerWorld article, Samsung will end the practice of disabling Windows Update. Of course, one has to wonder why they did it in the first place. If you have one of the systems that disabled Windows Update, a patch will restore the system to perform the required updates.

 

Dealing with Acronyms and Abbreviations

My books are packed with acronyms and abbreviations, and readers complain about them all the time. An acronym is a series of letters that shorten a term and you can say. For example, Language INtegrated Query (LINQ) is pronounced “link” so it counts as an acronym. An abbreviation is a shortened version of a term or phrase. For example, MicroSoft Developer Network (MSDN) is an abbreviation because you can’t say the term and must instead say each letter individually. Whether the term is an acronym or an abbreviation, I usually try to define it once every chapter. However, some truly common terms are only defined once in a book and if a term is considered universally known outside computer circles, such as CPU (for Central Processing Unit), I don’t define it at all.

Unfortunately, making an assumption can be a dangerous thing. I try to err on the side of defining terms too often so that readers can gain maximum benefit from my books with the least amount of effort. However, even making my best efforts, there are times when you might find an acronym or abbreviation that you simply don’t understand in one of my books. When this happens, you can always contact me at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com and I’ll be happy to define it for you. My goal is to ensure you have a great reading experience and that you discover everything possible about the topic at hand.

Some people prefer to do things for themselves. Hands on learning produces the best results for them and I do understand the need to address the learning methods each person uses with greatest ease. In this case, you have other options for finding the term you need defined. These sites will provide you with common terms used in my books (depending on the book, you may need to use more than one site):

Of course, there are many other fine online references, but these references should provide what you need in most cases. The worst case scenario would be to use the acronym or abbreviation without really knowing what it means. I encounter this problem all too often. Readers will contact me with a question that I truly can’t understand because of a misused term. Knowing what terms mean is an essential part of clear communication. Given that most of my communication is through e-mail, clear communication saves time and effort for everyone involved.

The question I get asked relatively often about acronyms and abbreviations is why the computer community uses them at all. After all, they’re confusing. Typing the full term every time you wanted to use it would be cumbersome at the least and error prone as well. Using a shorter term means concise communication. Using the terms correctly means precise communication. Every trade has its jargon and those jargon terms were created in order to ensure that two people communicating about a topic could do so in the most precise manner possible. I’ve discussed the need for jargon in the past in posts such as Power Words.

 

Announcing Beginning Programming with Python for Dummies

A number of people have written to ask me about the Beginning Programming with Python For Dummies books that I originally discussed in my Beta Readers Needed for Beginning Programming with Python For Dummies post. My copy of the book finally arrived on Friday and I can’t be more excited about how it turned out. This is the book you really need if you want to get started working with Python quickly and easily. As the title suggests, this is a beginner book—as in, you don’t need any experience to use it. Unlike most books, I don’t assume you already have some programming experience (although, you do need to know how to use your computer system). The really cool thing is that this is the book you need if you’re learning about programming in school and your school uses Python as a learning tool.

This book contains a wealth of examples, but you go through them using step-by-step procedures, so there isn’t any of the head scratching that occurs when you work with other books. The examples were tested on the Macintosh, Linux, and Windows platforms, but I’m sure they’ll work on other platforms as well. Any platform that runs Python and provides access to IDLE will be able to use this book. Here’s a list of the things you’ll learn:

  • Part I: Getting Started
    • Chapter 1: Talking to Your Computer
    • Chapter 2: Getting Your Own Copy of Python
    • Chapter 3: Interacting with Python
    • Chapter 4: Writing Your First Application
  • Part II: Talking the Talk
    • Chapter 5: Storing and Modifying Information
    • Chapter 6: Managing Information
    • Chapter 7: Making Decisions
    • Chapter 8: Performing Tasks Repetitively
    • Chapter 9: Dealing with Errors
  • Part III: Performing Common Tasks
    • Chapter 10: Interacting with Modules
    • Chapter 11: Working with Strings
    • Chapter 12: Managing Lists
    • Chapter 13: Collecting All Sorts of Data
    • Chapter 14: Creating and Using Classes
  • Part IV: Performing Advanced Tasks
    • Chapter 15: Storing Data in Files
    • Chapter 16: Sending an E-mail
  • Part V: Part of Tens
    • Chapter 17: Ten Amazing Programming Resources
    • Chapter 18: Ten Ways to Make a Living with Python
    • Chapter 19: Ten Interesting Tools
    • Chapter 20: Ten Libraries You Need to Know About

All the basics are here. By the time you complete this book, you can perform essential Python programming tasks and even use your new found knowledge in practical ways, such as sending an e-mail or storing data in files. Of course, there are limits to most books. This one doesn’t cover advanced topics—instead, it serves as your introduction to such books. Instead of spending hours just trying to figure out the jargon in these advanced books, you can move right along with doing something interesting.

This is your must have introduction to Python. Of course, I’m sure you have questions and I want to hear from you about them. Please feel free to contact me about any questions you have at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

Announcing C++ All-In-One for Dummies 3rd Edition

I’m really excited to announce the release of C++ All-In-One for Dummies, 3rd Edition. This is the book that:

  • Provides all the updates you’ve been wanting
  • Relies on the latest version of Code::Blocks
  • Includes better support for Windows, Linux, and Mac installations
  • Contains all the latest techniques, including lambda expressions

This is the book update that I discussed in Beta Readers Needed for a C++ Book Update. Here’s the new book layout:

  • Book I: Introduction C++
    • Chapter 1: Configuring Your System (18 Pages)
    • Chapter 2: Creating a First C++ Program (20 Pages)
    • Chapter 3: Storing Data in C++ (30 Pages)
    • Chapter 4: Directing Your C++ Program Flow (26 Pages)
    • Chapter 5: Dividing Your Work with Functions (26 Pages)
    • Chapter 6: Dividing Between Source-Code Files (16 Pages)
    • Chapter 7: Referring to Your Data through Pointers (30 Pages)
    • Chapter 8: Working with Classes (38 Pages)
    • Chapter 9: Using Advanced C++ Features (36 Pages)
  • Book II: Understanding Objects and Classes
    • Chapter 1: Planning and Building Objects (30 Pages)
    • Chapter 2: Describing Your Program with UML (20 Pages)
    • Chapter 3: Structuring Your Classes with UML (12 Pages)
    • Chapter 4: Demonstrating Behavior with UML (18 Pages)
    • Chapter 5: Modeling Your Programs with UML (12 Pages)
    • Chapter 6: Building with Design Patterns (30 Pages)
  • Book III: Fixing Problems
    • Chapter 1: Dealing with Bugs (12 Pages)
    • Chapter 2: Debugging a Program (14 Pages)
    • Chapter 3: Stopping and Inspecting Your Code (12 Pages)
    • Chapter 4: Traveling About the Stack (10 Pages)
  • Book IV: Advanced Programming
    • Chapter 1: Working with rays, Pointers, and References (30 Pages)
    • Chapter 2: Creating Data Structures (22 Pages)
    • Chapter 3: Constructors, Destructors, and Exceptions (28 Pages)
    • Chapter 4: Advanced Class Usage (26 Pages)
    • Chapter 5: Creating Classes and Templates (32 Pages)
    • Chapter 6: Programming with the Standd Libry (38 Pages)
    • Chapter 7: Working with Lambda Expressions (16 Pages)
  • Book V: Reading and Writing Files
    • Chapter 1: Filing Information with the Streams Libry (14 Pages)
    • Chapter 2: Writing with Output Streams (16 Pages)
    • Chapter 3: Reading with Input Streams (12 Pages)
    • Chapter 4: Building Directories and Contents (10 Pages)
    • Chapter 5: Streaming Your Own Classes (12 Pages)
  • Book VI: Advanced C++
    • Chapter 1: Exploring the Standd Libry Further (20 Pages)
    • Chapter 2: Working with User Defined Literals (UDLs) (16 Pages)
    • Chapter 3: Building Original Templates (20 Pages)
    • Chapter 4: Investigating Boost (26 Pages)
    • Chapter 5: Boosting Up a Step (16 Pages)
  • Appendix A: Automating Your Programs with Makefiles (12 Pages)

As you can see, this new book focuses a lot more strongly on standardized C++ so that you can get more out of it. There isn’t any mention of Microsoft special features any longer. You can use this book in all sorts of environments now and expect the examples to work (with some modification depending on how well your compiler adheres to the standard). Most importantly, there is now a chapter specifically designed to help you get your system configured so you can begin enjoying the book in a shorter time.

As always, I highly recommend you download the book’s source code from http://www.dummies.com/extras/cplusplusaio/ (the source code appears at the bottom of the page, so you must scroll down). In addition to the source code, the site also contains a wealth of extras that you really want to check out as part of your book purchase. Of course, there is always room for additional information, so let me know about the topics you’d like to see covered on the blog as well. You can check out the current posts at: http://blog.johnmuellerbooks.com/category/technical/c-all-in-one-for-dummies/.

I’m really excited about this new book and want to hear from you about it. Please feel free to contact me about any questions you have at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

Using the Set Command to Your Advantage

Last week I created a post about the Windows path. A number of people wrote me about that post with questions. Yes, you can use the technique for setting the Path environment variable to set any other environment variable. The Windows Environment Variables dialog box works for any environment variable—including those used by language environments such as Java, JavaScript, and Python. Windows doesn’t actually care what sort of environment variable you create using the method that I discuss in that post. The environment variable will appear in every new command prompt window you create for either a single user or all users of a particular system, depending on how you create the environment variable.

A few of you took me to task for not mentioning the Set command. This particular command appears in both Administering Windows Server 2008 Server Core and Windows Command-Line Administration Instant Reference. It’s a useful command because you can temporarily configure a command prompt session to support a new set of settings. When the session is ended, the settings are gone. Only those settings you create as part of Environment Variables window have any permanence. There are other tricks you can use, but using Set for temporary environment variables and the Environment Variables window for permanent environment variables are the two most common approaches.

In order to see the current environment variables you simply type Set and press Enter at the command line. If you add a space and one or more letters, you see just the matching environment variables. For example, type Set U and press Enter to see all of the environment variables that begin with the letter U.

To set an environment variable, you add the name of the variable, an equals sign (=), and the variable value. For example, to set the value of MyVariable to Hello, you type Set MyVariable=Hello and press Enter. To verify that MyVariable does indeed equal Hello, you type Set MyVariable and press Enter. The command prompt will display the value of MyVariable. When you’re done using MyVariable, you can type Set MyVariable= and press Enter. Notice the addition of the equals sign. If you ask for the value of MyVariable again, the command prompt will tell you it doesn’t exist.

Newer versions of the command prompt provide some additional functionality. For example, you might set MyVariable within a batch file and not know what value it should contain when you create the batch file. In this case, you can prompt the user to provide a value using the /P command line switch. For example, if you type Set /P MyVariable=Type a value for my variable: and press Enter, you’ll see a prompt to enter the variable value.

It’s also possible to perform math with Set using the /A command line switch. There is a whole list of standard math notations you can use. Type Set /? and press Enter to see them all. If you write application code at all, you’ll recognize the standard symbols. For example, if you want to increment the value of a variable each time something happens, you can use the += operator. Type Set /A MyVariable+=1 and press Enter to see how this works. The first time you make the call, MyVariable will equal 1. However, on each succeeding call, the value will increment by 1 (for values of 2, 3, and so on).

Environment variables support expansion and you can see this work using the Echo command. For example, if you type Echo %MyVariable%, you see the value of MyVariable.

However, you might not want the entire value of MyVariable. Newer versions of the command prompt support substrings. The variable name is followed by a :~, the beginning position, a comma, and the ending position. For example, if you place Hello World in MyVariable, and then type Echo %MyVariable:~0,5% and press Enter, you see Hello as the output, not Hello World. Adding a negative sign causes the expansion to occur from the end of the string. For example, if you type Echo %MyVariable:~-5% and press Enter, you see World as the output.

The Set command is a valuable addition to both the administrator’s and programmer’s toolkit because it lets you set environment variables temporarily. The Set command figures prominently in batch file processing and also provides configuration options for specific needs. Let me know about your environment variable questions as they pertain to my books at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

Your Security is an Illusion

I receive a number of queries about security from administrators and users every month, and many of these questions have links to all sorts of security issues that have occurred recently—everything from National Security Agency (NSA) spying to the Target security breach (incidentally, a number of other businesses have been attacked in the same manner). The fact of the matter is that books such as Administering Windows Server 2008 Server Core, Microsoft Windows Command Line Administration Instant Reference, and Windows 8 for Dummies Quick Reference have been telling you all along that security is a matter of vigilance—that software will never do the job alone. Even so, readers keep sending requests for some sort of magic bullet that will allay all their fears and make the task of security automatic.

Maintaining a reasonably secure system is a matter of observing personal, data, and system-wide best practices. Many other authors have listed these best practices in the past, but here are some of the techniques that people fail to use most often:

 

  • Use complex passwords that are easy to remember so you don’t need to write them down—consider using a passphrase whenever possible.
  • Change your password reasonably often and don’t rely on the same set of passwords all the time.
  • Keep your passwords secret so that no one else can abuse them.
  • Encrypt your data.
  • Perform local data backups regularly.
  • Ensure your applications remain updated with the latest security fixes.
  • Update your system as needed to ensure it provides a full set of modern security features.
  • Install security applications that check the incoming and outgoing flow of data, and block anything that looks remotely dangerous.
  • Check your system regularly for any files, folders, software, or other items that look out of place.


This list doesn’t even include some of the common user foibles, such as opening e-mail from parties they don’t know. In addition, none of these techniques are automated. You have to perform the manually in order to get the benefits they provide. Yes, it’s true that some of the techniques are automated once you start them, but you still have to start them. For example, installing security software will automatically monitor the data flow on your system, but you still have to install the security software manually.

Even with all of these security measures in place, someone who is truly determined can break into your system. You should simply count on it happening at some point, even if you’re incredibly careful. When a security breach does occur, you need to have a contingency plan in place.

Any good contingency plan will include a method of evaluating the damage caused by the security breach. You need to know just what was compromised and what the fallout of the compromise will be. Even individuals experience fallout from security breaches, such as identity theft. Once the damage is evaluated, you need a method for fixing the problems it has caused. In some cases, you may actually have to format the drive and start from scratch, which is where that data backup is going to become critical.

There is no magic bullet when it comes to security. Over the years I’ve searched, in vain, for a magic bullet and it isn’t even possible to conceive of one. Therefore, it’s the user and administrator who are best prepared for the eventuality of spying and security breaches that are in the best position to handle it later. Let me know your thoughts on security at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

Beta Readers Needed for an Updated Java Book

Quite some time ago I had announced the completion of Java eLearning Kit for Dummies. Well, sometimes things don’t go quite as planned in the publishing world and this edition of the book never quite got out the door. Fortunately, the book is still alive and those of you who eagerly anticipated the last book won’t be disappointed this time. What I’ll be doing is updating that previous manuscript to work with Java 8 and to include new Java 8 features such as lambda expressions.

Of course, I still want to avoid making any errors in the book if at all possible. That’s where you come into play. I need beta readers for this updated version of the book. You’ll get to hear about the latest Java 8 functionality and see it in action. This version of Java is really exciting because of the important changes it contains. As a beta reader, you’ll get to see the manuscript as I write it and make comments about the material it contains. In other words, you get to help shape the content of my book and make it a better product—one specifically designed to meet your needs.

Don’t worry about your credentials. In fact, that’s the entire purpose of the beta reader program. I want people who would actually read this book as participants, so your knowledge of Java is unimportant. This is a book for the beginner and doesn’t assume any knowledge on your part. In addition, the platform you use doesn’t matter. This book will address the requirements for using Java on the Mac, Windows, and Linux platforms. By the time you get done with the book, you’ll have gained new skills that you can use to better your position at work or to create applications as a hobby. No matter what your reason for wanting to learn Java, I’d love to hear from you as a potential beta reader because this book is for everyone who wants to learn something new about this language.

Anyone who participates will get their name mentioned in the Acknowledgements (unless you specifically mention that you’d rather not receive credit). The last edition of the book attracted 15 beta readers, all of whom contributed substantially to the high quality of that edition. If you’re interested in participating in this edition, I definitely welcome your input. Please contact me at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com if you want to learn more about the beta reader program and this book in particular.

 

Understanding the Maturing of the Command Line

A number of people have asked me why I’ve written several different command line reference books. The answer is that each book serves a different market. Serving reader needs is a quest of mine. As reader needs change, I also change my books to better meet those needs. The command line may seem static, but reader needs have changed over the years because of the way in which the command line is perceived and the new commands added to it.

The most popular of the set, Windows Command-Line Administration Instant Reference, provides the reader with quick access to the most commonly used commands. In addition, this book emphasize examples over documentation, so you see how to use a command, but don’t necessarily get every detail about it (only those that are used most often). This book is mainly designed to assist administrators. With this group in mind, the book also provides a good overview of batch files and scripting. The point is to provide something small that an administrator can easily carry around.

A second command line reference, Administering Windows Server 2008 Server Core, is designed to meet the needs of those who use Microsoft’s Spartan Server Core operating system. The book includes a number of special features for this audience, such as instructions on getting hard to install software to work in this environment. This is also the only book that discusses how to use Mono to overcome .NET Framework limitations in this environment. Even though the title specifies Windows Server 2008 Server Core, the book has also been tested with Windows Server 2012 Server Core. The point of this book is to allow you to get all of the speed, reliability, and security benefits of Server Core installations without all of the hassle that most administrators face.

My third command line reference, Windows Administration at the Command Line for Windows Vista, Windows 2003, Windows XP, and Windows 2000, serves the general needs of administrators and power users. This book is intended to help anyone use the command line more efficiently. It provides a little more hand holding and considerable more detail about all of the available commands than my other two books. This is also the only book that discusses PowerShell.

The PowerShell portion of this third book has received a lot more attention as of late. Microsoft is making a much stronger emphasis on this new version of the command line, so I’m glad I included it in my book. One of the strong suites of this book is that it not only discusses documented commands, but many undocumented commands as well (with the appropriate caveats, of course).

No matter which version of my command line reference you use, I’m always here to answer your questions about my books. How do you interact with the command line? Has PowerShell taken a more prominent role in the way you do your work? Let me know at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

Limitations of the FindStr Utility

Readers have noted that I use the FindStr utility quite often. This utility is documented in both Windows Command-Line Administration Instant Reference and Administering Windows Server 2008 Server Core (and also appears a host of my other books). At the time I wrote that documentation, I had no idea of how much comment this particular utility would generate. I’ve written a number of posts about it, including Accessing Sample Database Data (Part 3), Understanding Line-, Token-, and String-Based Command Line UtilitiesUsing the FindStr Utility to Locate Errors in Visual Studio, and Regular Expressions with FindStr. It might be possible that people think that this utility is infallible, but it most certainly has limits. Of course, the FindStr utility is line-based and I’ve already documented that limitation. However, it has other limitations as well.

The most important limitation you must consider is how FindStr works. This utility works with raw files. So, you can use it to look inside executable files and locate those produced by a specific organization as long as the file contains unencrypted data. When an executable relies on obfuscation or other techniques to render the content less viewable by competitors, the strings that you normally locate using FindStr might become mangled as well—making them invisible to the utility. In practice, this particular problem rarely happens, but you need to be aware that it does happen and very likely will happen when the executable file’s creator has something to hide (think virus).

Another problem is that FindStr can’t look inside archives or other processed data. For example, you can’t look inside a .ZIP file and hope to locate that missing file. You might initially think that there is a way around this problem by using the functionality provided in Windows 7 and newer versions of Windows to look inside archive files and treat them as folders. However, this functionality only exists within Windows Explorer. You can’t open a command prompt inside an archive file and use FindStr with it.

Recently, a reader had written me about his Office installation. Previously, he had used FindStr to locate specific files based on their content—sometimes using content that wasn’t searchable in other ways. This feature suddenly stopped working and the reader wondered why. It turns out that .DOC files are raw, while .DOCX files are archives. Change the extension of a .DOCX file to .ZIP and you’ll suddenly find that your ZIP file utilities work great with it. Old Office files work well with FindStr—new files only work if you save them in .DOC format.

Another reader wrote to ask about network drives. It seems that the reader was having a problem locating files on a network drive unless the drive was mapped. This actually isn’t a limitation, but you do have to think about what you want to do. Let’s say you’re looking for a series of .DOC files on the C drive (with a shared name of Drive C) of a server named WinServer in the WinWord folder that contain the word Java in them. The command would look like this: FindStr /m /s “Java” “\\WinServer\Drive C\WinWord\*.doc”. When using network drives, you must include the server name, the share name, the path, and the file specification as part of the command. Otherwise, FindStr won’t work. What I have found though is that FindStr works best with Windows servers. If you try to use it with another server type, you might experience problems because FindStr won’t know how to navigate the directory structure.

There is a real limit on the length of your search string. Another reader wrote with this immense search string and wondered why FindStr was complaining about it. The utility appears to have a search string length limit of 127 characters (found through experimentation and not documented—your experience may differ). The workaround is to find a shorter search string or to perform multiple searches (refining the search by creating a more detailed file specification). If you can’t use either workaround, then you need to write an application using something like VBScript to perform the task.

These are the questions that readers have asked most about. Of course, I want to hear your question about limitations as well. If you encounter some strange FindStr behavior that affects my book’s content in some way, please be sure to write at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

An End of Support for Moonlight, the Silverlight Alternative

I’ve promoted using the Mono, open source alternative to the .NET Framework, for more than a little while now. Mono makes it possible to use .NET applications in environments where you might not otherwise be able to run them. I commonly use Mono with my Linux setup. However, it may interest you to know that I’ve also used it with Windows 2008 Server Core. In fact, I wrote one of several articles on the topic for DevSource. Some of my books, such as Administering Windows Server 2008 Server Core, rely on Mono as a means for accomplishing tasks that would be difficult otherwise. Moonlight, is the Silverlight equivalent of Mono. It lets you run .NET Web applications on other platforms. Unfortunately, Xamarin, the folks who support Mono, have chosen not to continue supporting Moonlight.

Actually, there is some confusion about precisely who does provide support Moonlight. It seems that even though you download Moonlight from the Mono site, Xamarin never took official possession of the product. Until now, Novell has been providing the updates for Moonlight and the last update was quite some time ago. I just checked and you can still download Moonlight. I would imagine that the Moonlight download will remain accessible for the foreseeable future, so any ASP.NET applications you’ve created will continue to run on your Linux system. The major problems seem to be in the updates that Microsoft has added to Silverlight and that Silverlight has never gained the sort of traction that Xamarin hoped it would as a desktop application platform.

Mono is actually a versatile framework. It runs on openSUSE, Max OS X, Windows, Solaris, and other (including Debian and Ubuntu) platforms. All you need to do is download the version needed for your system. I’ve tested a number of my applications on Mono for both C# Design and Development and Start Here! Learn Microsoft Visual C# 2010 Programming. Command line applications almost always work, while some graphics applications will have problems (but even they run a majority of the time). The key is whether the application adheres strictly to the conventions for working with the .NET Framework, doesn’t use any special libraries, and doesn’t rely on P/Invoke. In short, your well-behaved application will generally work on Mono.

Moonlight provides similar functionality for Linux systems. I had always hoped that it would enjoy the same level of support as Mono does at some point, but it just never gained the required level of usage. Even if you can’t use Moonlight in it’s current form for your applications, it would be a good idea to consider at least trying Mono. You may find that the .NET application you thought would only run on Windows systems, runs just fine on all of the other platforms that I just mentioned. If you have any questions about Moonlight or Mono, let me know at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. I’ll do my best to answer them or find a source of information for you.

I’d also love to hear about your Mono and Moonlight usage experiences. It would be especially interesting to know whether you’ve used either product in a production environment and about any issues you encountered using them. The ability to expand your .NET applications beyond Windows is a reality despite what you may have heard to the contrary.