Installing and Managing Third Party Products

Most of my books make recommendations about third party products that you can use to enhance your computing experience. Each of these products is tested during the writing process, but without any of the add-on applications that may come with the product. For example, if I test a Windows enhancement product, I don’t test the toolbar that comes with that product. So, it’s important to realize that the advice you obtain in the book doesn’t include those add-on features.

However, it’s important to take a step back at this point and discuss why the product includes an add-on in the first place. Just like you, the product vendor has bills to pay and must obtain money from somewhere to pay them. An important concept to remember when working with computers is that free doesn’t exist. Typically, product vendors who offer free products will do so by paying for them in one of these ways:

  • Advertisements: Advertising comes in many forms, not just banner ads. Marketing types constantly come up with new ways to advertise products and induce you to buy them. A developer can obtain payment from advertisements in several ways, such as referral fees.
  • Product Add-ons: A developer can provide the means to install other products with the product that you’re installing. The company who provides the additional product sponsors the free product that you’re using.
  • Marketing Agreements: The application collects information about you and your system when you install it and the developer sells this information to marketing companies.
  • Value-added Products: The free product that you’re using is just a sample of some other product that the developer provides. If you like the free product, the developer is hoping that you’ll eventually purchase the full-fledged product.
  • Government Grants: A developer creates a product after obtaining a grant from the government. You pay for the product through your taxes.
  • Sponsorship: A larger company supports a developer’s work to determine whether the idea is marketable or simply the seed of something the larger company can develop later. You pay for the product through higher prices when you buy something from the larger company.

There are other methods that developers use to get paid for their work, but the bottom line is that they get paid. Whenever you see free, your mind should say, “This product doesn’t cost money, but there is some other price.” You need to decide whether you’re willing to pay the price the developer is asking. In the case of a government grant, you’ve already paid the price.

When you install a free product, you must watch the installation routine carefully. In almost every case, you must opt out of installing add-on products that the free product supports. So, you have to read every screen carefully because these opt-out check boxes are usually small and hard to see. The developer really isn’t pulling a fast oneā€”just trying to earn a living. Make sure you clear any check boxes you see for installing add-on products if you don’t want that product on your machine. The reason I don’t discuss these check boxes in my books is that they change constantly. Even if I were to tell you about the check boxes that appeared at the time I installed the free product, your experience is bound to be different.

Of course, you might accidentally install one of these add-ons, an add-on that you really didn’t want. In this case, you must locate the product in the list of products installed on your system, such as the Programs and Features applet of the Control Panel for Windows users. The product name won’t be straightforward, but a little research will help you find it. Simply uninstall the add-on product. However, it’s always better to avoid installing something you don’t want to begin with, rather than remove it later, because few applications uninstall cleanly (even those from larger vendors such as Microsoft).

Unfortunately, there isn’t much I can do to help you when you install an add-on product. I do have some experience with the third party product in my book, but I won’t know anything about the add-on product. You need to contact the developer of the third party product to ask for advice in removing it from your system. This may seem like I’m passing the buck, but the truth is that the add-on products change all the time and there simply isn’t any way I can keep up with them all. When in doubt, don’t install a product, rather than being sorry you installed it later. Let me know your thoughts on third party products at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.