API Security and the Developer

As our world becomes ever more interconnected, developers rely more and more on code and data sources outside of the environment in which the application runs. Using external code and data sources has a considerable number of advantages, not the least of which is keeping application development on schedule and within budget. However, working with APIs, whether local or on someone else’s system, means performing additional levels of testing. It isn’t enough to know that the application works as planned when used in the way you originally envisioned it being used. That’s why I wrote API Security Testing: Think Like a Bad Guy. This article helps you understand the sorts of attacks you might encounter when working with a third party API or allowing others to use your API.

Knowing the sources and types of potential threats can help you create better debugging processes for your organization. In reality, most security breaches today point to a lack of proper testing and an inability to debug applications because the inner workings of that application are poorly understood by those who maintain them. Blaming the user for interacting with an application incorrectly, hackers for exploiting API weaknesses, or third parties for improperly testing their APIs are simply excuses. Unfortunately, no one is interested in hearing excuses when an application opens a door to user data of various types.

It was serendipity that I was asked to review the recent Snapchat debacle and write an article about it. My editorial appears as Security Lessons Courtesy of Snapchat. The problems with Snapchat are significant and they could have been avoided with proper testing procedures, QA, and debugging techniques.This vendor is doing precisely all the wrong thingsā€”I truly couldn’t have asked for a better example to illustrate the issues that can occur when APIs aren’t tested correctly and fully. The results of the security breach are truly devastating from a certain perspective. As far as I know, no one had their identity stolen, but many people have lost their dignity and privacy as a result of the security breach. Certainly, someone will try to extort money from those who have been compromised. After all, you really don’t want your significant other, your boss, or your associates to see that inappropriate picture.

The need to test APIs carefully, fully, and without preconceived notions of how the user will interact with the API is essential. Until APIs become more secure and developers begin to take security seriously, you can expect a continuous stream of security breaches to appear in both the trade press and national media. The disturbing trend is that vendors now tend to blame users, but this really is a dead end. The best advice I can provide to software developers is to assume the user will always attempt to use your application incorrectly, no matter how much training the user receives.

Of course, it isn’t just APIs that require vigorous testing, but applications as a whole. However, errors in APIs tend to be worse because a single API can see use in a number of applications. So, a single error in the API is spread far wider than a similar error in an application. Let me know your thoughts on API security testing at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.