HTML5 and CSS3 Bugs in iOS 7

Several readers have written to ask about an article that appeared in InfoWorld entitled, “Bad news: iOS 7’s HTML5 is full of bugs.” In reading about the bugs, it doesn’t appear that any of them will affect the examples found in either HTML5 Programming with JavaScript for Dummies or CSS3 for Dummies. Unfortunately, I don’t personally own a copy of iOS 7 to perform any testing to verify that there aren’t any problems. A helpful reader did test a few examples for me and didn’t report any errors. If you find that you’re having problems with any of the examples in either book, please let me know at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

This issue does serve to point out a problem that I’ve encountered more than a few times in supporting my books. A vendor can release a faulty version of a library, operating system, or other support software required for my books and it will appear that the examples are buggy to the reader. If you read about these sorts of issues, please let me know about them so that I can test the book examples and report back to you here.

 

Obtaining an Editor for Your Web-based Application

One of the things I like most about writing code for Web-based applications is that there are so many libraries out there to make the task simple. You can stitch together libraries to create an application in only a small amount of the time required to create the same application in desktop form and the resulting application is going to be a lot more flexible. (Admittedly, the desktop application is usually prettier and can be faster.) Some time intensive tasks for desktop developers, such as creating an editor, require little or no work when creating a Web-based application. In fact, you can get a number of editors for free as described in my article, “5 Free JavaScript Libraries to Add Text Editing to Your Web Application.”

In this case, I wanted to see what was available in the way of editors. There are quite a large number of editors out there, some paid, some not. After discovering that the scope of my original article idea was too large (just editors in general), I decided to narrow the scope to just those editors that are free. After all, why pay for something you can get free unless you actually need the special features of the paid product?

Unfortunately, I still ended up with too many editors (somewhere in the neighborhood of 20). So, I decided to categorize the editors by complexity and presentation. I ended up with five major categories that span the range from simple to complex. The article contains what I think are the five best editors. Of course, your opinion may vary from mine. The point is, that you have a significant number of editors to choose from, so there is absolutely no reason to ever write code to create your own editor unless you need something truly specialized.

I’m thinking about other sorts of classes of application module for future articles. For example, it might be necessary to create an application where the user can make a simple drawing to show how something is put together or how something has failed. I actually needed such a module when trying to describe the glass panes used in the front of my wood stove not long ago and finally resorted to using paper and faxing it. The graphics module would have been easier, faster, and simpler.

What sorts of modules do you need for your Web-based applications? I’m always looking for good ideas from the people who read my material. Send me your thoughts at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

Software Quality Connection is Moving

A lot of you know that I write articles for Software Quality Connection (SQC) from time-to-time. In fact, you can find the newer articles listed in the Articles category of this blog. All of the existing articles and any new articles I write will still be available for your viewing pleasure. However, they’ll be moving to a new location, SmartBear blog. You can read about this update in the Software Quality Connection – Now Part of the SmartBear blog post. Make sure you subscribe to either the RSS feed or e-mail messages so that you get all of the amazing posts from this organization.

Of course, I’m concerned that you’re able to continue to read my articles. If you experience any problems, whatsoever, accessing one of my articles, please let me know. I’ll do my best to clear things up. For example, my most recent SQC article, “How to Inherit Somebody Else’s Code” now appears at http://blog.smartbear.com/software-quality/bid/167035/.

My future articles will appear on the new site. I’ll let you know as they get published so you can take a look and provide your usual feedback to me. Let me know if you have any questions about the new setup at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.