Python Used for Common User Interface Needs

My upcoming book, Beginning Programming with Python For Dummies, describes how to start working with Python. You discover how to perform all the basics and I even provide a few real world examples. However, once you’re done with the book, you might ask how Python can be used for real world programming of the sort that you need to do. One of the most common tasks is creating a user interface. Just about every application out there requires a user interface and it has become popular to make user interfaces touchable. Fortunately, Python developers have access to a huge number of libraries to make seemingly hard tasks simple. In fact, that’s one of the advantages of using Python—the immense number of really practical and useful libraries at your disposal. It’s possible to find a library for just about any need.

One of the more interesting libraries available for Python is Kivy. This library makes it possible to create multitouch applications without having to do all the heavy lifting yourself. The interesting thing about using Kivy for this task is that it helps you avoid some of the problems with other sort of multitouch application environments, such as using a combination of HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript (where a less than compatible browser can ruin your chances of making the application work properly). This is a native code library that works on the Linux, Windows, OS X, Android and iOS platforms, so you have a good chance of finding precisely the support you need in a package that will perform well on the chosen platforms. Like all Python applications, the application you create on the Mac will work just fine on Windows too.

Of course, there are tons of libraries for Python, so why did I choose to talk about this particular library? It turns out that Kivy is proactive about obtaining as much developer support as possible, to the point of running contests (yes, that’s more than one of them) to see what sorts of things people can do with Kivy. I’ll admit it, I was bedazzled looking at all the eye candy on this site. What I thought was a five minute scan of the example applications turned out to be more than an hour of perusing what’s possible with Kivy and Python. All you need to do to try one of the applications out is to click its link, download the code, and start running it. Nothing could be easier (or time consuming as it turns out). Soon, you’ll find your days consumed by checking out Kivy applications too.

Fortunately, Kivy is also free. All you need to do is download the copy for your platform and install it. So, you get this great library that you can use for your business applications and it doesn’t cost you a dime. What I’d most like to hear about is whether someone is using Kivy in a large scale business application and how its performing for them. Speed is always an issue with Python, despite all the other amazing features it provides, so finding libraries that use every bit of speed Python has to offer is essential.

I take a lot of time looking for various tools, libraries, applications, and other resources for readers to use with my books. I’m not looking for anything cheesy, crippled, or difficult to use—I want well written, popular, and preferably free resources I can share. If you have a resource that specifically meets the needs of my readers, please let me know about it at