Using Hypermedia to Your Advantage

Many developers are familiar with the task of making a request to a server and receiving a response. We’ve been performing the same task since before the PC even appeared on the scene. So, it’s hard to imagine that anything new has come up. Hypermedia is that new thing, but before we go to far, let me fill in a few details.

When working on the Web, these requests normally go through a Web service that relies on a technology such as SOAP or REST. The essential idea is always the same—send a request, receive a response to that request (even when the response is an error). Of course, the Web adds it’s own wrinkles to the process. For example, most Web services rely on text-based data transfers, rather than the binary transfers used in the past.

The problem with this request/response scenario is that it assumes that the Application Programming Interface (API) used to make the transfer of information happen is well-documented by the provider and also well-understood by the developer. Unfortunately, documentation is often poor and understanding is even poorer. Wouldn’t it be nice if along with the response to a request, a developer also received a list of things that the result allows. Hypermedia performs precisely that task. When you make a request to a service that provides hypermedia support, not only do you get the information you requested, but you also get a list of things you can do with that information.

Hypermedia has just started picking up steam in the last year, so it doesn’t appear in any of my current books (you can bet it will in the future). However, I recently wrote an article about it entitled, Working with Hypermedia APIs. The article provides you with a good overview of what hypermedia APIs can do for you, why they’re an important new way of working with services, and what you can expect from them. Still, hypermedia APIs are in their infancy and I’ll eventually need to provide additional information about them.

Precisely what I do depends on your response to the article and to this post. For example, it may eventually be a good idea to get into the design criteria for hypermedia APIs. On the other hand, it may be better to start with existing hypermedia API services so that you can better see how they work. I’d like to hear from you about your interest level in the topic so that I know how to proceed. Make sure you write me about hypermedia APIs at or provide a comment to this blog post.