E-mail in Windows 8

A reader recently wrote to ask about using e-mail in Windows 8 with a POP3 account. It’s a topic I didn’t cover due to the limits in the size of my book. Windows 8 for Dummies Quick Reference is meant more as an overview—the kind of book you grab when you have a quick question about a native Windows 8 feature. There are some issues I wish I had covered, but then the question arises of what I would remove to provide that coverage. It’s a constant battle for an author.

The native e-mail option for Windows 8 is to use your Microsoft account. It’s the account you use to access the Windows Store and other Windows 8 features. Of course, you probably have an existing e-mail account and will want to use that instead of Microsoft’s offering. Unfortunately, anyone moving from Windows XP directly to Windows 8 will be shocked to learn that there is no Outlook Express to use. In fact, Outlook Express has been dead since Vista. There really wasn’t space in the book to discuss any other options, but I know that readers still have questions about what to do with the Post Office Protocol version 3 (POP3) account.

Fortunately, there is a quick fix for the problem, even though Microsoft doesn’t make it readily apparent. The article, “How to Read POP Mail in Windows 8” tells you everything you need to know about installing support for your POP3 account. However, the Mail app in Windows 8 is extremely limited and another reader complained about it’s limitations to me after installing the POP3 support.

There are a number of options that you can pursue. For example, you could install Mozilla’s Thunderbird. Unfortunately, Thunderbird isn’t an app, so you can’t access it easily through the Modern User Interface (UI) (also known as Metro). The alternative is to use Windows Live Mail. It does offer a full range of functionality. The article entitled, “How to Install Windows Live Mail in Windows 8” tells you how to perform this task. The article entitled, “Windows Live Mail POP3” completes the task by telling you how to configure Windows Live Mail to use a POP3 account.

Given that Windows 8 is new and has a completely new interface, it will take a while for it to become a target platform for most e-mail vendors. In the meantime, you now have a few options for that POP3 account you’ve been wanting to use with your Windows 8 installation. I’d love to hear about any alternatives you might have or news about new e-mail applications for the Modern UI at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

Source Code Support

Sometimes I need to make really tough decisions.  It isn’t a matter of wanting to make the decision—the need to make the decision is thrust upon me. The topic of this post is source code support in the form of reader uploads. The topic of just how far I need to support book source code has come up before in conversations with readers. For example, in the Source Code Download Issues post, I discuss problems that readers have had in obtaining source code for my books in the past. The issue addressed in this post is files that are removed from archive (.ZIP) files by applications such as firewalls. In some rare cases, files are missing from the download and the reader looks to me to solve the problem. A few readers have gone so far as to say that I really need to provide CDs with the source code on them and mail those disks out free of charge as part of supporting the book. Unfortunately, supporting the books in this way is well beyond my ability. I could easily go bankrupt providing this level of support.

Up until now, I’ve been willing to send source code to a reader who needs it using e-mail unless the book is on my unsupported list. This past month has been especially hectic with reader requests for source code uploads (well over a hundred of them). In some cases, the books in question are ten or more years old, which means I must look the book up in my archives and determine whether the source code is even available. Once I make that determination, I copy the source from the archive and send it to the reader in one or more e-mails. Some of the source code files are 20 MB or so in size and many reader e-mail accounts won’t accept a file that size, so I have to break the file down into pieces and send multiple e-mails to the reader—a time-consuming and error prone task. This past week I went through several problematic uploads and finally gave up trying to support the reader in a number of cases. Nothing I would do would allow the reader to receive the file using e-mail.

I’ve thought about making the source available on my Web site, but that approach hasn’t worked well in the past because readers will often complain they can’t find the source or that the source on the Web site is corrupted (or any number of other issues). Of course, there are also costs associated with online storage for source code for 89 books. After a lot of thought, I have decided that trying to support a book’s source code in this manner won’t work either.

With this in mind, I’ve decided that you’ll need to rely on the publisher’s site for downloading any source code associated with a book, unless the publisher provides a CD for the book. If there is a source code CD, then you need to follow the procedure described in my Obtaining Replacements for Broken Media post to obtain a new CD. I didn’t come to this decision easily because I prefer to provide the fullest possible level of support for my books whenever possible. The issue is the time required to provide the support. On some days it has gotten to the point where a good part of my day is spent looking for resources that readers need and not getting much else accomplished.

When a publisher decides that it’s no longer feasible to provide download support for a book, the source code for that book will become unavailable. In fact, I’ll likely add the book to my unsupported list. It wasn’t an easy decision, but I had to make it because the e-mail support has gotten to the point of affecting the support I can provide to readers for other needs. Please let me know about any concerns you have about this new policy at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. If someone has a really good solution for this problem—one in which I can provide long term source code support without incurring huge monetary or time issues, I’ll provide an updated post. Thank you for your continued support of my books.

 

Entering the New Year

Today is my first day back from vacation. I’ve been looking forward to telling you everything that has happened during my down time! In fact, unlike many people, I really look forward to getting back to work. Well, the crammed inbox is a bit of a pain, but even the e-mail surplus is a reminder to me that you’re finding the help in my books useful.

Vacation is a bit of a misnomer for me. Yes, I do unplug from the computer as described in my Learning to Unplug post, but there is plenty to do outside. One of the new experiences I had during vacation was working on a large tree. My uncle had an oak with a 44″ diameter trunk fall several years ago. It was time to cut it up this winter. I only have a 22″ bar on my chainsaw and a 22″ bar doesn’t quite reach 22″ into the trunk, so we had a bit of trouble getting the rounds cut from the trunk. Cutting as much as I could and then using wedges to do the rest worked fine. Moving pieces that large is also a problem because you can’t lift them (or barely budge them for that matter). I learned how to use a cant hook to move the large pieces of wood onto the splitter (my uncle has a hydraulic splitter attached to his tractor). I still use a 20 pound splitting maul and splitting wedge to hand split all of my wood. Most people use a lighter splitting maul, but the abundance of white and red elm, black locust, and hickory on my property makes a heavier maul a necessity. Lets just say that between helping my uncle and cutting a bit of my own wood, I didn’t lack for exercise during vacation .

This year we did get to spend quite a bit of time with family and friends, especially since the weather here is Wisconsin is unusually mild. We don’t have any snow on the ground to speak of at the moment and none is in the forecast. Of course, the lack of snow makes travel easy, but it’s also worrisome because our plants will miss the moisture come spring and we could experience problems due to the lack of cover. However, each winter is different and I’m sure we’ll get clobbered by a snowstorm or two before all is said and done.

Rebecca and I also spent time putting a puzzle together (a review will appear later this week) and we had some fun watching movies. Of course, the tea kettle received a workout as we spent time in front of the wood stove enjoying something good to read. Overall, a nice way to rest during vacation. We didn’t just stay at home though. The new Sherlock Holmes movie called to us, so we went to see it at our local theater. Of course, there were visits to Deli Bean (a local coffee shop) and Stone Hollow (our local restaurant), where we enjoyed some nice treats.

The mild weather also made it possible for me to walk in the woods. During one of my visits to the woods, I kept track of a fox. Cody (see Many Hands Make Light Work) and I had spotted a dead raccoon near a den in the woods, so I perched a distance from the den to see if anything came out. The den had a fox in it last winter and it appears that the same fox is there this winter. So, I sat on my stump for a while and watched. I find nature amazing. The woods provides us with food, heat, and entertainmentwhat more could anyone ask?

However, in addition to these activities, I also worked on some ideas for upcoming books, which is one of the focuses of this post. I’m planning to write some books on self-sufficiency. The books will have the same focus as my blog posts. I want to make things simple and to demonstrate ways you can also receive a financial benefit from your activities. Self-sufficiency is great because you help the environment, improve your health, and get a better product. For many people, these reasons look attractive until you start considering the financial element of self-sufficiency. Surprisingly, many people are unaware of the fact that self-sufficiency saves considerable money—enough that you really need to consider it as a source of income, rather than as a money sink. My new book will emphasize what you get in exchange for your efforts and how to optimize the benefits you receive. If you have some ideas on what you’d like to see in my book, please be sure to write me at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

Vacation is a time for equipment maintenance as well. I was able to get a few necessary maintenance tasks done during vacation. Another week off would have been nice, but I did get the essentials done.

One of my favorite activities during vacation was baking cookies with Rebecca. She makes the most delightful cookies and it’s always a pleasure to give her a hand when I can. We made sugar cookies this time around, but next time we may do something a bit more exciting.

Today is the first in-office work day of the year for me. Please be patient if you’ve sent me an e-mail while I’ve been gone. I promise to answer every e-mail that I’ve received while I was gone, but with a little over 900 reader e-mails in my inbox, it takes a while to get the job done. In the meantime, I hope that you’ve had a great start to the new year and I’m looking forward to presenting you will all sorts of really neat posts this upcoming year on just about every topic imaginable!