Using Java with Windows 10

I’m starting to get more requests for information about using the materials in Java eLearning Kit for Dummies with Windows 10. Java for Dummies eLearning Kit is designed for use with Windows 7, Linux, or Mac OS X, and Java 7. However, as mentioned in the Java 7 Patches and Future post, I’ve tested enough of the code with Java 8 to feel fairly certain that the book will also work fine with Java 8. Unfortunately, using the book with Windows 10 will prove problematic.

The Windows 10 and Java FAQ sheet tells you about the some of the issues in using Java with the new operating system. For example, you can’t use the Edge browser with Java because it doesn’t support plug-ins. You need to install a different browser to even contemplate using Java eLearning Kit for Dummies—I highly recommend Firefox or Chrome, but the only requirement is that the browser support plugins.

Because Java eLearning Kit for Dummies is supposed to provide you with a more intense than usual learning experience, using Windows 10 is counterproductive. For example, none of the procedures in the book will work with Windows 10 because even the act of accessing the Control Panel is different. With this in mind, I truly can’t recommend or support Windows 10 users for this particular book without saying that your learning experience will be less complete than I intended when I wrote the book.

There is still no timeline from the publisher for creating an update of this book. If you really want a Windows 10 version of this book, then you need to contact the publisher directly at http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-1118098781.html and ask for it. If you have any book-specific questions, please feel free to contact me at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

Practice Icon on Page 59

A number of you have written to ask me about the Practice icon on page 59 of Java eLearning Kit for Dummies. It turns out that the practice won’t quite work as originally written because Java’s Random class now ensures that you get a random number each time you call it. As a result, the original practice no longer works.

In order to obtain consistent results from the example, you would need to set the seed to the same value every time. Here is an example of what I mean:

// Import the required API classes.
import java.util.Scanner;
import java.util.Random;
import java.util.Calendar;
 
public class ShowInt
{
    public static void main(String args[])
    {
        // Create the scanner.
        Scanner GetInt = new Scanner(System.in);
         
        // Obtain an int value.
        System.out.print("Type a number between 1 and 10: ");
        int YourGuess = GetInt.nextInt();
         
        // Get the current time.
        Calendar MyCal = Calendar.getInstance();
         
        // Create a random number generator.
        Random MyRandom = new Random();
         
        // Set the seed value for the random number using
        // the current number of milliseconds in the time.
        //MyRandom.setSeed(MyCal.getTimeInMillis());
        MyRandom.setSeed(5);
         
        // Obtain a random number between 1 and 10.
        int MyGuess = MyRandom.nextInt(10) + 1;
         
        // Display the value on screen.
        System.out.print("Your guess was: " + YourGuess);
        System.out.println(" My guess was: " + MyGuess);
    }
}

Notice that I’ve commented out the original MyRandom.setSeed(MyCal.getTimeInMillis()); line that ensures you get a more random result every time and added a new MyRandom.setSeed(5); line that sets the seed to the same value every time. Now when you run the example, you get the same value every time. On my system, the example guesses 8 every time.

This change to the practice should produce the desired result. I’m sorry about any confusion the original practice may have causes. Please let me know about any other book-related concerns at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

Beta Readers Needed for an Updated Java Book

Quite some time ago I had announced the completion of Java eLearning Kit for Dummies. Well, sometimes things don’t go quite as planned in the publishing world and this edition of the book never quite got out the door. Fortunately, the book is still alive and those of you who eagerly anticipated the last book won’t be disappointed this time. What I’ll be doing is updating that previous manuscript to work with Java 8 and to include new Java 8 features such as lambda expressions.

Of course, I still want to avoid making any errors in the book if at all possible. That’s where you come into play. I need beta readers for this updated version of the book. You’ll get to hear about the latest Java 8 functionality and see it in action. This version of Java is really exciting because of the important changes it contains. As a beta reader, you’ll get to see the manuscript as I write it and make comments about the material it contains. In other words, you get to help shape the content of my book and make it a better product—one specifically designed to meet your needs.

Don’t worry about your credentials. In fact, that’s the entire purpose of the beta reader program. I want people who would actually read this book as participants, so your knowledge of Java is unimportant. This is a book for the beginner and doesn’t assume any knowledge on your part. In addition, the platform you use doesn’t matter. This book will address the requirements for using Java on the Mac, Windows, and Linux platforms. By the time you get done with the book, you’ll have gained new skills that you can use to better your position at work or to create applications as a hobby. No matter what your reason for wanting to learn Java, I’d love to hear from you as a potential beta reader because this book is for everyone who wants to learn something new about this language.

Anyone who participates will get their name mentioned in the Acknowledgements (unless you specifically mention that you’d rather not receive credit). The last edition of the book attracted 15 beta readers, all of whom contributed substantially to the high quality of that edition. If you’re interested in participating in this edition, I definitely welcome your input. Please contact me at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com if you want to learn more about the beta reader program and this book in particular.

 

Java eLearning Kit for Dummies Manuscript Finished

Nothing excites me more than to complete the manuscript for another book. I actually completed the Java eLearning Kit for Dummies manuscript last week Wednesday, but there are always last minute things to do. Today I’m considering the manuscript for book number 89 done. At this point, I’m working on Author Review (AR)—a process where I interact with the various editors. I answer any questions they might have about my book’s content and also check their edits to make sure no mistakes have been introduced.

This book is really exciting for a number of reasons. First of all, it’s a carefully crafted tutorial. Even if you’re a complete novice, you should be able to use this book. Every term is defined, the code is fully documented, and you shouldn’t run into any unpleasant surprises where the author assumes that you know something that you don’t. In fact, this book had a total of 15 beta readers involved in reviewing the material, in addition to my ever faithful editors. Of course, being precise and careful doesn’t mean you won’t have questions and I always welcome your questions about any book I write.

Second, this book is intended for use on multiple platforms. It doesn’t matter whether you work on a Linux, Macintosh, or Windows machine—you can use this book to learn how to write basic Java applications. Creating a book that works on so many platforms is exhilarating in the extreme. I couldn’t have done it without the support of my beta readers and I wish to thank every one of them publicly. You’ll find the names of the beta readers who didn’t mind me mentioning them in the Acknowledgements when the book is released.

Third, this book is the first I’ve ever written that comes with an interactive CD. You don’t really have to read anything if you don’t want. I estimate that you can get upwards of 85% of the content of the book simply by listening to the CD. Of course, books on tape have been providing this service for a long time. The difference with this book is that the CD is interactive. Not only will you hear the text, but you’ll see animations demonstrating the various things you need to know about Java. A number of different quiz types will test your knowledge of Java as you progress through the book. Finally, you’ll work through hands on exercises in order to build your skills. In short, this book includes everything that some of the newer interactive books include, but in a form that works on any computer system.

It’s important for any buyer to understand that this book truly is intended for novice readers. You aren’t going to get an intense Java workout by reading this book. In fact, here is a list of the lessons in the book:

 

  • Lesson 1: Starting With Java
  • Lesson 2: Using Primitive Variables
  • Lesson 3: Using Object Variables
  • Lesson 4: Formatting Variable Content
  • Lesson 5: Working with Operators
  • Lesson 6: Working with Conditional Statements
  • Lesson 7: Repeating Tasks Using Loops
  • Lesson 8: Handling Errors
  • Lesson 9: Creating and Using Classes
  • Lesson 10: Accessing Data Sets Using Arrays and Collections
  • Lesson 11: Performing Advanced String Manipulation
  • Lesson 12: Interacting with Files
  • Lesson 13: Manipulating XML Data


Nothing here is earth shattering, but you do get a good basic knowledge of Java. By the time you’re finished, you’ll know enough to move on to the harder to understand tutorials you find in books and online. In order to demonstrate all of the techniques in these topics, you’ll find 101 fully documented examples. Each one is designed for you to work through and interact with so that you fully understand precisely how Java works on your platform.

I’ll be working on the CD for the next while. As soon as it’s finished, I’ll provide you with an update about the CD content. For example, I’ll let you know a bit more about the kinds of exams I’m providing. Let me know if you have any questions about my new book at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.