Missing Machine Learning for Dummies Downloadable Source Files

A number of people have contacted me to tell me that the downloadable source for Machine Learning for Dummies isn’t appearing on the Dummies site as described in the book. I’ve contacted the publisher about the issue and the downloadable source is now available at http://www.dummies.com/extras/machinelearning. Please look on the Downloads tab, which you can also find at http://www.dummies.com/DummiesTitle/productCd-1119245516,descCd-DOWNLOAD.html and navigate to Click to Download to receive the approximately 485 KB source code file.

When you get the file, open the archive on your hard drive and then follow the directions in the book to create the source code repository for each language. The repository instructions appear on Page 60 for the R programming language and on Page 99 for Python. I apologize for any problems that the initial lack of source code may have caused. If you experience any problems whatsoever in using the source code, please feel free to contact me at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. Luca and I want to be certain that you have a great learning experience, which means being able to download and use the book’s source code because using hand typed code often leads to problems.

 

Using Java with Windows 10

I’m starting to get more requests for information about using the materials in Java eLearning Kit for Dummies with Windows 10. Java for Dummies eLearning Kit is designed for use with Windows 7, Linux, or Mac OS X, and Java 7. However, as mentioned in the Java 7 Patches and Future post, I’ve tested enough of the code with Java 8 to feel fairly certain that the book will also work fine with Java 8. Unfortunately, using the book with Windows 10 will prove problematic.

The Windows 10 and Java FAQ sheet tells you about the some of the issues in using Java with the new operating system. For example, you can’t use the Edge browser with Java because it doesn’t support plug-ins. You need to install a different browser to even contemplate using Java eLearning Kit for Dummies—I highly recommend Firefox or Chrome, but the only requirement is that the browser support plugins.

Because Java eLearning Kit for Dummies is supposed to provide you with a more intense than usual learning experience, using Windows 10 is counterproductive. For example, none of the procedures in the book will work with Windows 10 because even the act of accessing the Control Panel is different. With this in mind, I truly can’t recommend or support Windows 10 users for this particular book without saying that your learning experience will be less complete than I intended when I wrote the book.

There is still no timeline from the publisher for creating an update of this book. If you really want a Windows 10 version of this book, then you need to contact the publisher directly at http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-1118098781.html and ask for it. If you have any book-specific questions, please feel free to contact me at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

Python for Data Science for Dummies Errata on Page 221

The downloadable source for Python for Data Science for Dummies contains a problem that doesn’t actually appear in the book. If you look at page 221, the code block in the middle of the page contains a line saying import numpy as np. This line is essential because the code won’t run without it. The downloadable source for Chapter 12 is missing this line so the example doesn’t run. This P4DS4D; 12; Stretching Pythons Capabilities link provides you with a .ZIP file that contains the replacement source code. Simple remove the P4DS4D; 12; Stretching Pythons Capabilities.ipynb file from the archive and use it in place of your existing file.

Luca and I always want you to have a great experience with our book, so keep those emails coming. Please let me know if you have any questions about source code file update at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. I’m sorry about any errors that appear in the downloadable source and appreciate the readers who have pointed them out.

 

Python for Data Science for Dummies Errata on Page 145

Python for Data Science for Dummies contains two errors on page 145. The first error appears in the second paragraph on that page. You can safely disregard the sentence that reads, “The use_idf controls the use of inverse-document-frequency reweighting, which is turned off in this case.” The code doesn’t contain a reference to the use_idf parameter. However, you can read about it on the Scikit-Learn site. This parameter defaults to being turned on, which is how it’s used for the example.

The second error is also in the second paragraph. The discussion references the tf_transformer.transform() method call. The actual method call is tfidf.transform(), which does appear in the sample code. The discussion about how the method works is correct, just the name of the object is wrong.

Please let me know if you have any questions about either of these changes at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. I’m sorry about any errors that appear in the book and appreciate the readers who have pointed them out.

 

Python for Data Science for Dummies Errata on Page 124

Python for Data Science for Dummies contains an error in the example that appears on the top half of page 124. In the first of the two grey boxes, the code computes the results of four print statements. The bottom-most print statement, print x[1:2, 1:2], is supposed to compute a result based on rows 1 and 2 of columns 1 and 2, and the bottom grey box seems to confirm that interpretation by the showing the result as [[[14 15 16] [17 18 19]] [[24 25 26] [27 28 29]]]. However, the answer provided for this example in the downloadable source code is [[[14 15 16]]], which doesn’t agree with that in the text.

The good news is that the downloadable source contains the correct code. The error appears only in the book. The last print statement in the book is wrong. Here is the correct code (with output) for this example:

x = np.array([[[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9],],
 [[11,12,13], [14,15,16], [17,18,19],],
 [[21,22,23], [24,25,26], [27,28,29]]])

print x[1,1]
print x[:,1,1]
print x[1,:,1]
print
print x[1:3, 1:3]
[14 15 16]
[ 5 15 25]
[12 15 18]

[[[14 15 16]
 [17 18 19]]

[[24 25 26]
 [27 28 29]]]

Please let me know if you have any questions about this example at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. I’m sorry about the error that appears in the book and appreciate the readers who have pointed it out.

 

Missing XMLData2.xml File

A number of readers have written to report that XMLData2.xml is missing from the downloadable source for Python for Data Science for Dummies. You encounter this file in Chapter 6, on page 108. The publisher has already added the file to the downloadable source, but you might be missing the file from your copy. If so, you can download it by clicking XMLData2.zip. I’m truly sorry about any problems that the missing file might have caused. Please be sure to let me know about your book specific question at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

Code::Blocks on the Mac

A lot of Mac users have written to complain about the stability of Code::Blocks 8.02 on the Mac. This is the version used for the 2nd Edition of C++ All-in-One for Dummies. My first recommendation is that you obtain a copy of C++ All-In-One for Dummies, 3rd Edition if at all possible. This edition of the book contains additional installation details, updated examples, and all sorts of extras that will make your C++ learning experience so much better. Of course, not everyone will want to make the upgrade, but I stick by previous posts saying that some examples won’t work as well as they might if you use a different version of Code::Blocks than specified in the books. However, I also feel your pain. I personally didn’t experience stability problems with the 8.02 release and I’m sure others didn’t either, but enough people have complained that I feel obliged to discuss the issue in a post.

The Code::Blocks 13.12 version used for the 3rd Edition book is considerably more stable than the 8.02 version used for the 2nd edition book. If you really must continue using the 2nd edition book with your Mac, I suggest that you update to Code::Blocks 13.12 if you find that the 8.02 version causes you problems. If you go this route, please be sure to read the Using Code::Blocks 13.12 with C++ All-in-One for Dummies post. It provides you with information you absolutely must have in order to use the updated version successfully.

I always want to hear your book-specific input at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. Your input helps me create better books and it also allows me to provide posts like this one that help readers work around potential issues. Thank you for your continued support of my books!

 

Missing File from Python for Data Science for Dummies Downloadable Source

A reader recently contacted me regarding a missing file from the downloadable source for Python for Data Science for Dummies. This is the P4DS4D; 01; Quick Overview.ipynb you need for the first chapter. Simply click here to download P4DS4D; 01; Quick Overview.ipynb. I’m also asking the publisher to add the missing file to the downloadable source found on the Dummies site at http://www.dummies.com/store/product/Python-for-Data-Science-For-Dummies.productCd-1118844181,descCd-DOWNLOAD.html. If you encounter any other problems with the book, please be sure to let me know at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. Thank you for your patience!

 

Download Site for Python

I recently received an e-mail from a reader who had a bad install with Python 3.3.4 on a laptop with 64-bit Windows 7 installed. No matter what the reader did, the installation wouldn’t work. The application would fail with an error stating that pythonw.exe was unable to start and it included an error of 0xc000007b. He had downloaded the code from https://www.python.org/download/releases/3.3.4/, which is the site mentioned on page 25 of Beginning Programming with Python For Dummies. However, downloading a copy from http://continuum.io/downloads#py34 or https://store.continuum.io/cshop/anaconda/ did provide a copy of Python 3.4.3 (not the version 3.3.4 that is used in the book) that does work on his system.

The problem with this solution is that installing a copy from this second site also installs Anaconda—a product that isn’t covered in the book. In order to work with the IDLE examples in the book, you must open a copy of IDLE in the Anaconda\Scripts folder of the Anaconda installation. You’ll likely find this folder in your personal folder of your system. If you do find that you can’t get the copy of the product from the Python download site to work on your system, try this second solution and please let me know about the issue at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. I would strongly encourage you to try the setup found in the book, however, because using Anaconda will cause extra work for you and this book is truly meant to help someone who has little or no programming experience discover the joys of working with Python.

As a side note, I have tried the book’s source code with the latest Python release, 3.4.3 (the book was originally written to use version 3.3.4). All of the source code works on my test system, but I’d love to hear if it works on your system as well. You can obtain this updated version of Python at https://www.python.org/downloads/release/python-343/ or http://continuum.io/downloads#py34 (if you don’t mind installing Anaconda as well).

When using the 3.4.3 version of Python, your screenshots may vary some from those found in the book. All version-specific information will change, so you need to take this change into account as you read. Please let me know if you experience any problems using this updated version on your system. In the meantime, happy reading!

 

Missing Python for Data Science for Dummies Companion Files

For all those long suffering readers who have been missing the companion files for Python for Data Science for Dummies, they’re finally available at http://www.dummies.com/store/product/Python-for-Data-Science-For-Dummies.productCd-1118844181,descCd-DOWNLOAD.html. All you need to do is click the Click to Download link on the page. I’m truly sorry you needed to wait so long. Thank you to everyone who noticed the missing files and also the incorrect link in the book, which now appears in the book errata. Please let me know if you have any problems locating the files or downloading them at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.