A Fuller Understanding of the Internet of Things

You can find the Internet of Things (IoT) discussed just about everywhere today because the Internet has become pervasive. IoT is part of most business applications today as discussed in Security for Web Developers and part of any PC you build as discussed in Build Your Own PC on a Budget. It appears as part of smart TVs and Blue-ray players. In fact, you find IoT employed in a lot of places you might not have thought possible even a year ago. The point is that IoT is here to stay and we need to consider some of the ramifications of it on every day life.

One of the issues that hasn’t surprised me too much is the issue of security. Both my smart TV and smart Blue-ray player require me to enter a password to access the Internet through my wireless router (mostly because the router is configured to require one). So these devices do employ security to some extent. However, they remain logged on at all times, so the router is also configured to disconnect devices after a certain time. Each time I turn the devices on, I must reenter the password. It’s a level of security, but not necessarily the best security. Some devices, such as Apple Watch, lack any form of security. (In the case of Apple Watch, the device authenticates through an iPhone, so it still has some level of security, but not security that is part of the device itself.) Some industry pundits are saying that these devices will eventually kill the password, which means that some other form of primary authentication is needed.

The problem is increased by the proliferation of headless devices (products that lack any sort of display, such as a door lock, security system, or robots). In these cases, you can’t enter a password. No one is really sure how to secure these devices, but a solution really is needed and soon. Unless we find a solution, the issues surrounding intentional hacking will increase. A recent InfoWorld article, Welcome to the smart home … of horror!, emphasizes some of the sorts of things that could happen due to a lack of security.

Security and configuration problems aren’t just limited to outsiders gaining access to your home, office, business, or other location due to holes in IoT security. It also turns out that smart devices aren’t particularly smart, so sometimes you lose access to your network and its connected devices due to a combination of security and configuration issues when a failure occurs. In the ComputerWorld article, The Internet of Things: Your worst nightmare, you can hear about one person’s attempt to recover from a simple router failure. It turns out that simply replacing the router wasn’t enough—everything connected to the router needed reconfiguration and sometimes the task was less than easy to perform.

The world is in a age of transformation. The ride will be bumpy and the problems severe. When you consider the immensity of the things that are changing, the future looks incredibly different from anything that has gone on in the past. Not only is there IoT to consider, but the whole issue of robots and other technologies that are coming to fore. As these new technologies become part of everyday life, we have to ensure we can use them safely and that ability of someone to hurt us through them is curtailed. Let me know your thoughts about IoT security and configuration at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

Resetting Your CodeBlocks Configuration

Quite a few people have written to me about issues they have with C++ All-In-One Desk Reference For Dummies that involve getting CodeBlocks up and running. The posts in the C++ All-in-One for Dummies archive normally provide everything needed to get the compiler up and running. I even provide posts on using the 10.05 version of the product, should you wish to upgrade. However, there are rare times when no matter how much you try, you simply can’t get the compiler to work.

One technique I haven’t really covered until now is to reset the CodeBlocks configuration. The problem with this approach is that it resets all of your settings, not just those that could be in error. This is the reason that I’ve taken a more measured approach to helping readers through problems until now. My concern is that resetting everything will actually cause more problems and end up confusing some readers, so you really do want to try those other posts first. That said, there are situations where resetting CodeBlocks is the only course of action that will work.

To reset your settings, open your copy of CodeBlocks. Choose Settings | Compiler and Debugger. You see the Compiler and Debugger Settings dialog box shown here.

ResettingYourCodeBlocksConfiguration01

Click Reset Defaults. This action will reset all of the defaults so that they match the initial installation configuration unless you have created a default of your own. Make absolutely certain that the Selected Compiler field shows GNU GCC Compiler as shown in the figure and then click OK. Close and then reopen CodeBlocks before you test your configuration.

Let me know if you have any questions about this procedure at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. It’s always my goal to make my books as useful to you as possible.

Configuring Visual Studio for IronPython Use

Last week I discussed a small bit of information I left out of my book in the procedure that begins on page 26 (see Professional IronPython Chapter 2 Step-by-Step Procedure Update for details). It turns out that the small bit of information isn’t the only thing you need to worry about with that procedure. A reader wrote in to mention that the basic settings you choose can also make a difference. If you have Visual Studio configured for Web Development, the procedure won’t work. That’s because of the way Visual Studio treats Web development. The problem is that you won’t have a solution (.SLN file) to save. I encountered this problem once before, but forgot about the issue until the reader wrote to me. Use the following procedure to check your settings:

  1. Choose Tools→Import and Export Settings. You’ll see the Import and Export Settings Wizard dialog box shown here.
    VisualStudioSetup01
  2. Choose Reset All Settings and click Next. The wizard will ask you to save your current settings as shown here. It’s always a good idea to save your settings before even looking at the configuration.
    VisualStudioSetup02
  3. Click Next. You’ll see the Choose a Default Collection of Settings page shown here. This is where the problem lies. I normally choose General Development Settings because I work in a lot of different languages. If your dialog box shows that Web Development is selected, then the procedure won’t work.
    VisualStudioSetup03
  4. Choose a setting other than Web Development (I highly recommend the General Development Settings as being the most versatile) and click Finish. Visual Studio will reconfigure itself for whatever settings you chose. This change will make it possible to save the project solution file for the examples in Professional IronPython.

 

If anyone encounters any other problems with this procedure, please be sure to let me know at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. I’m always happy to hear from readers about issues regarding my books and want to make things as easy as possible for you.