Browser Support in My Books

A number of my books rely on browser output to show the result of various coding techniques, including Security for Web Developers, HTML5 Programming with JavaScript for Dummies, and CSS3 for Dummies. I try to keep up with changes in technology with my books and I’m currently testing the code in all three books with Internet Explorer 11. According to a recent ComputerWorld article, users of older version of IE only have six weeks to make an update to the new version. They can also use the Edge browser or move to a competitor’s browser. My books list the browsers I used for initial testing of the source code, but I do try to at least check the code with newer browsers to ensure you have a good reading experience. In this case, the check is critical because I can’t expect you to rely on unsupported software to use my books.

When I originally wrote each of these books, I had at least one technical editor and a number of beta readers checking my code under various conditions to ensure the code would run as advertised on the maximum number of systems. I no longer have the support, so I’m testing these updates on just my systems. If you encounter a problem with the source code of any of these books, please be sure to contact me at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. Now, here’s the important part. Make absolutely certain to let me know that you’re using a newer browser—one not originally tested in the book so I can handle your query correctly and also provide an update on my blog. Your input will help other readers.

Whenever possible, I encourage readers to use the environment described in the book to write their own code. Doing so reduces the potential for problems because I know that the environment is tested by a number of people in a number of environments. However, sometimes using the original environment isn’t possible any longer, such as this instance where Microsoft is putting its collective foot down and forcing an update. Please be sure to write me if you have any questions about the source code for these book. Thanks, as always, for your continued support!

 

Happy New Year!

Welcome to the New Year! It’s going to be an interesting year from a number of perspectives. I’m really looking forward to seeing the changes and I hope that you are too! Make sure you subscribe to my blog to keep up with all of the new material I provide with greater ease. A subscription will automatically send a synopsis of new content directly to your e-mail, which will make it a lot easier to determine whether you want to follow a certain post (and it’s associated comments).

The computer market will continue to move away from the desktop toward all sorts of mobile devices. Of course, this will make browser-based applications become even more popular because you can achieve the same look and feel no matter which platform you use to interact with the application. I’m not saying the desktop is dead, but look for browser-based applications to take on added importance. In some respects, browser-based applications can still be limited, so you’ll continue to see the desktop used in situations where a user must interact with complex data from multiple sources.

Self-sufficiency is going to take on added importance as well. There are a number of reasons for the increased participation by people. Of course, the economy continues to provide ample reason for many people who are looking to ways to make their money go further. A lot of people are starting to realize that self-sufficiency also comes with substantial health benefits and is also good for the environment. In fact, except for the time commitment and the requirement to learn new skills, self-sufficiency has a lot to recommend it. I’m planning to provide more emphasis on self-sufficiency in the coming months.

My blog will also feature some of the additional kinds of content that you’ve come to know and love. I’ll be posting a number of reviews and a bit more of my poetry as time permits. A few posts on writing technique are almost a requirement. A number of you have sent e-mail asking about my crafting. A few personal issues have kept me from posting on the crafts that I enjoy, but I plan to address that particular need soon. I hope that you continue to enjoy my blog and will let me know the sorts of content you’d like to see at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. In the meantime, Happy New Year!

 

Continuing Education

I don’t know if you’ve noticed, but I’m continually asking questions in my blog posts. In fact, you can find questions in a few of my books and more than a few readers have commented when I ask them questions as part of my correspondence with them. I often get the feeling that people think I should know everything simply because I write books of various sorts. In fact, I had to write a post not long ago entitled No, I Don’t Know Everything to address the issue. Experts become experts by asking questions and finding the answers. They remain experts by asking yet more questions and finding yet more answers. Often, these answers come from the strangest sources, which means that true experts look in every nook and cranny for answers that could easily elude someone else. Good authors snoop more than even the typical expert—yes, we’re just plain nosy. So, here I am today asking still more questions.

This year my continuing education has involved working with the latest version of the Entity Framework. The results of some of my efforts can be found in Microsoft ADO.NET Entity Framework Step by Step. You can also find some of my thoughts in the Entity Framework Development Step-by-Step category. I’ve been using some of my new found knowledge to build some applications for personal use. They may eventually appear as part of a book or on this blog (or I might simply choose to keep them to myself).

However, my main technical focus has been on browser-based application technology. I think the use of browser-based application technology will make it possible for the next revolution in computing to occur. It certainly makes it easier for a developer to create applications that run anywhere and on any device. You can find some of what I have learned in two new books HTML5 Programming with JavaScript for Dummies and CSS3 for Dummies. Of course, there are blog categories for these two books as well: HTML5 Programming with JavaScript for Dummies and Developing with CSS3 for Dummies. A current learning focus is on the SCAlable LAnguage (SCALA), which is a functional language (akin to F# and many other languages of the same type) based on Java.

Anyone who knows me very well realizes that my life doesn’t center on technology. I have a great number of other interests. When it comes to being outdoors, I’ve explored a number of new techniques this year as I planted some new trees. In fact, I’ll eventually share a technique I learned for removing small tree stumps. I needed a method for removing stumps of older fruit trees in order to plant new trees in the same location.

I’ve also shared a number of building projects with you, including the shelving in our larder and a special type of dolly you can use for moving chicken tractors safely. Self-sufficiency often involves building your own tools. In some cases, a suitable tool doesn’t exist, but more often the problem is one of cost. Buying a tool from the store or having someone else build it for you might be too expensive.

The point I’m trying to make is that life should be a continual learning process. There isn’t any way that you can learn everything there is to learn. Even the most active mind picks and chooses from the vast array of available learning materials. No matter what your interests might be, I encourage you to continue learning—to continue building your arsenal of knowledge. Let me know your thoughts on the learning process at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

JavaScript and Memory Leaks

I recently finished writing HTML5 Programming with JavaScript For Dummies. This book focuses a lot of attention on working efficiently with JavaScript to produce full-fledged browser-based applications. You’ll find everything from creating simple code to update form entries to creating interesting special effects for your user interface. In fact, I spend considerable time looking at third party libraries such as jQuery and jQuery UI—an incredibly useful set of functions that can significantly reduce coding time.

One of my goals in the book is to introduce you to techniques that produce useful applications in an incredibly short time without writing bad code. The term bad code covers a lot of ground, but one of the more serious issues is one of memory leaks. Applications that have memory leaks will cause the application and everything else on the system to slow down due to a lack of usable memory. In addition, memory leaks can actually cause the application to crash or the system to freeze when all of the available memory is used up. So, it was with great interest that I read an InfoWorld article recently entitled, “Brendan Eich tells how to prevent JavaScript memory leaks.” The article contains a lot of useful advice in writing good JavaScript code that won’t cause your users heartache. Just in case you’ve never heard of him, Brendan Eich is the creator of the JavaScript language, so I’m sure he knows quite a lot about what makes the language tick.

There are a few points of interest in the article. A big one is that the memory leak you’re seeing in your application may not be due to your code—it may be caused by the browser. The potential for browser problems is an important one to keep in mind because these issues affect every application that runs, not just yours. However, when your application performs a lot of work that requires heavy memory use, the user may see your application as the culprit. It pays to track browser issues so that you can support your users properly and recommend browser updates for running your application when appropriate. For that matter, you can simply determine whether the user has one of the poorly designed browsers and tell the user to perform an update instead of running the application.

What I found curious about the article is that it doesn’t discuss other potential sources of memory leaks. For example, using the wrong third party library could cause considerable woe when it comes to memory usage (amongst other issues). Consequently, you need to research any libraries or templates that you use carefully. The libraries, templates, and other tools discussed in my book were chosen with extreme care to ensure you get the best start possible in creating JavaScript applications.

One of the reasons I find JavaScript so compelling as a language is that it has grown to include enough features to create real applications that run in just about any browser on just about any platform. The ability to run applications anywhere at any time has been a long term goal of computer science and it finally seems to be a reality at a certain level. What are your thoughts on JavaScript? Let me know at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.