Missing Machine Learning for Dummies Downloadable Source Files

A number of people have contacted me to tell me that the downloadable source for Machine Learning for Dummies isn’t appearing on the Dummies site as described in the book. I’ve contacted the publisher about the issue and the downloadable source is now available at http://www.dummies.com/extras/machinelearning. Please look on the Downloads tab, which you can also find at http://www.dummies.com/DummiesTitle/productCd-1119245516,descCd-DOWNLOAD.html and navigate to Click to Download to receive the approximately 485 KB source code file.

When you get the file, open the archive on your hard drive and then follow the directions in the book to create the source code repository for each language. The repository instructions appear on Page 60 for the R programming language and on Page 99 for Python. I apologize for any problems that the initial lack of source code may have caused. If you experience any problems whatsoever in using the source code, please feel free to contact me at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. Luca and I want to be certain that you have a great learning experience, which means being able to download and use the book’s source code because using hand typed code often leads to problems.

 

Beta Readers Needed for Amazon Web Services for Admins for Dummies

I still remember Amazon Web Services (AWS) when it was simply a method for getting information about Amazon products, making sales, and getting product status. The original web service didn’t do much, but people absolutely loved it, so it continued to evolve. Amazon has put a lot of work into AWS since that humble beginning and now you can perform all sorts of tasks that have nothing to do with buying or selling anything. You can create an entire IT structure for your organization that doesn’t involve any of the micromanagement, hardware purchases, software purchases, and other issues that kept IT from doing what it was supposed to do in the past—serving user needs in the most efficient manner possible.

There are a number of AWS books either published or currently in the process of being published, but these books don’t really answer the one question that everyone appears to be asking in the forums online, “How do I get started?” Most of the titles out there right now answer questions for a specific group after that group has installed the product and gotten started with it. AWS is immense and is naturally intimidating. Unfortunately, the getting started documentation from Amazon is incomplete, outdated, and hard to understand. Amazon Web Services for Admins for Dummies helps administrators (the focus group) and others (such as DevOps and developers) get started so that they can actually make use of that next level up book. Here are the sorts of things you see covered in the book:

  • Part I: Uncovering the AWS Landscape
    • Chapter 1: Starting Your AWS Adventure
    • Chapter 2: Obtaining Free Amazon Services
    • Chapter 3: Determining Which Services to Use
  • Part II: Configuring a Virtual Server
    • Chapter 4: Creating a Virtual Server Using EC2
    • Chapter 5: Managing Web Apps Using Elastic Beanstalk
    • Chapter 6: Responding to Events with Lambda
  • Part III: Working with Storage
    • Chapter 7: Working with Cloud Storage Using S3
    • Chapter 8: Managing Files Using Elastic File System
    • Chapter 9: Archiving Data Using Glacier
  • Part IV: Performing Basic Database Management
    • Chapter 10: Getting Basic DBMS Using RDS
    • Chapter 11: Moving Data Using Database Migration Service
    • Chapter 12: Gaining NoSQL Access Using DynamoDB
  • Part V: Interacting with Networks
    • Chapter 13: Isolating Cloud Resources Using Virtual Private Cloud
    • Chapter 14: Connecting Directly to AWS with Direct Connect
  • Part VI: Getting Free Software
    • Chapter 15: Using the Infrastructure Software
    • Chapter 16: Supporting Users with Business Software
  • Part VII: The Part of Tens
    • Chapter 17: Ten Ways to Deploy AWS Quickly
    • Chapter 18: Ten Must Have AWS Software Packages

As you can see, this book is going to give you a good start in working with AWS by helping you with the basics. Because of the subject matter, I really want to avoid making any errors in this book, which is where you come into play. I’m looking for beta readers who want to use AWS to perform basic administration tasks, even when those tasks are related to a home office. In fact, I have a strong interest in trying to meet the needs of the small-to-medium sized business (SMB) because many of the other books out there cover the enterprise to the exclusion of these smaller entities. As a beta reader, you get to see the material as I write it. Your comments will help me improve the text and make it easier to use.

As you can see from the outline, Amazon Web Services (AWS) is actually a huge array of services that can affect consumers, Small to Medium Sized Business (SMB), and enterprises. Using AWS, you can do everything from back up your personal hard drive to creating a full-fledged IT department in the cloud. The installed base is immense. You can find case studies of companies like Adobe and Netflix that use AWS at https://aws.amazon.com/solutions/case-studies/. AWS use isn’t just for private companies either—even the government is involved. That’s why Amazon Web Services for Admins for Dummies has a somewhat narrowly focused audience and emphasizes a specific set of tasks that it will help you perform. Otherwise, a single book couldn’t even begin to cover the topic.

In consideration of your time and effort, your name will appear in the Acknowledgements (unless you specifically request that we not provide it). You also get to read the book free of charge. Being a beta reader is both fun and educational. If you have any interest in reviewing this book, please contact me at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com and will fill in all the details for you.

 

Review of Dodging Satan

Often, the best humor is found in tales with a real world basis, which is what you find in Dodging Satan by Kathleen Zamboni McCormick. Even though I’m not Catholic, I did attend a Lutheran school for much of my childhood and some of the events in the school scenes in the book rang all too true. (The scene where Bridget is given a guilt complex over eating too slow really did ring a bell.) Of course, school isn’t the focus of the book, Bridget is. Dodging Satan is a fictionalized autobiography that follows Bridget from about age 5 to about age 14. The book doesn’t follow a strict chronological flow, but uses short stories to tell Bridget’s tale (a format I really liked). Many of the stories started in the real world, but the author has changed names, embroidered the information a bit, and added the pizzazz that makes this book such a good read. Some things, like a time traveling St. Mary, really were part of the author’s life, but she tells the tale with humor, slightly askew of the real world events.

I’ve read many treatise on what makes for a good childhood—everything from upbringing to environment to recognizing a child’s gifts. However, Dodging Satan possibly brings up the most important element of all—a child’s imagination (although I doubt that it’s the author’s main goal to create a tale of child raising either). The book is funny because Bridget sees the world from a perspective that only a child who is trying to make sense of all of the conflicting inputs she’s receiving could possibly have. Trying to figure out how riding a bicycle can make one pregnant is just one of many conundrums that Bridget faces. There were times when I had tears rolling down my cheeks, such as when Bridget discovers the holy in the holy water. As you read the book, you see Bridget pondering various elements of Catholicism and I felt for her because I pondered at least a few of those same things as a Lutheran. (A fear that Satan was going to reach out and grab me was just one commonality.) It’s interesting to find that children commonly use all sorts of sources (religion in this case), often distorted, to explain the unexplained events in their lives.

The book does touch on a number of issues that were most definitely not talked about during my childhood, including abuse of various sorts and sexuality that we’re only now coming to grips with (for one thing, two of the aunts turned out to be lesbians). Some of these sections will most definitely make people uncomfortable, despite being told a bit tongue-in-cheek and with an eye toward a skewed version of the truth. It won’t surprise many people who grew up in poorer neighborhoods that abuse was, and still is, rampant. Bridget ends up coming to terms with these negatives in her life by inventing views that make them all seem plausible, if not entirely appropriate. The child view of these things is expertly written—in fact, this bit of writing is possibly the most fascinating part of the book because it really does present a significantly different perspective of events that shapes individuals and our country as a whole during the 60s and 70s (the book does avoid the use of dates because many of these issues are still taking place now). Bridget shows herself to be an amazing young lady because she does accept her lesbian aunts and comes to realize that they have a significant role to play in helping her come to terms with her own blossoming sexuality (not that Bridget becomes a lesbian, but I don’t want to give away the plot of the book either).

Is this a good book? Yes, I’m really glad I read it, but unlike many book covers, this one undersells the content. You will laugh, but you’ll also cry with Bridget a little and you’ll find yourself thinking about the odd events in your own childhood. In order to really get anything out of this book, you must be willing to step back and think about Bridget’s musings from an adult perspective. You see yourself when you were young from the perspective of having learned that the world really doesn’t involve things like time travel and no amount of imagination will make some things right. In short, if you’re looking for a good laugh and nothing else, then you probably won’t enjoy this book, but if you’re willing to give things a bit of thought, you’ll probably end up with more than you expected. Dodging Satan promises to be one of those books that will change you in ways you’ll never forget.

 

Review of Lost Hero of Cape Cod

The Lost Hero of Cape Cod by Vincent Miles revolves around the life of Asa Eldridge and, to a lesser extent, his bothers John and Oliver. The story takes place in that magic period when the age of sail is ending and the age of steam is beginning. The book is written in a narrative style is that really easy to read and understand. Yes, it includes dates, just as any historical book would contain, but the dates often come with relevant back stories that make them seem a lot easier to remember (or at least more interesting to learn about).

Unlike a lot of non-fiction books on history, this one is packed with all sorts of interesting graphics. You do find lots of pictures of ships, which goes without saying. However, the author thoughtfully includes all sorts of other graphics, such as newspaper clippings, pictures of the various characters, pictures of towns,  and even a series of log entries. The result is one of seeing as well as hearing the history the history that took place.

This is a book of fact, not trumped up fiction adorning itself as fact. The list of notes, bibliography, and illustration credits attest to the author’s diligence in learning as much as is possible about events at the time. Even so, the author makes it clear when the sources used are a bit dubious or incomplete. The facts, however, aren’t dry—they’re quite interesting. For example, I had never realized that anyone in their right mind would try shipping ice to India, yet it happened and this book tells you all about it. The manner in which the facts are presented provide a certain intrigue and excitement. You can actually feel the various groups vying for supremacy of the Atlantic and sneering at those who fail.

Most of the material revolves around the Atlantic and focuses on the established route between New York or Boston and Liverpool. However, you’re also treated to the round the world tour made by Cornelius Vanderbilt and his family (captained by Asa Eldridge, no less). Lost Hero of Cape Cod makes ample use of relatively long quotes to let the characters tell you what happened in their own words. Unfortunately, the quoted sections use a slightly smaller and lighter type that can make them a bit harder to read. Even so, you’ll want to read each quote because they’re all important.

About the only complaint that one could make about this outstanding book is that the author tends toward some repetition, especially near the end of the book. Part of the reason for repetition is that the book is topical, rather than chronological in nature. The repetition is easy to forgive, however, because the book is otherwise expertly written.

I’ve purposely left out some important facts that the book presents because I truly don’t want to ruin your reading experience. Let’s just say that Asa Eldridge is far more important as a historical character than you might initially think, yet he’s all but forgotten from the history books. Vincent Miles wants to overcome that oversight with this detailed account of Asa’s life that you’ll find completely immersive. If, like me, you like nautical history, then you really must get this book.

 

Python for Data Science for Dummies Errata on Page 221

The downloadable source for Python for Data Science for Dummies contains a problem that doesn’t actually appear in the book. If you look at page 221, the code block in the middle of the page contains a line saying import numpy as np. This line is essential because the code won’t run without it. The downloadable source for Chapter 12 is missing this line so the example doesn’t run. This P4DS4D; 12; Stretching Pythons Capabilities link provides you with a .ZIP file that contains the replacement source code. Simple remove the P4DS4D; 12; Stretching Pythons Capabilities.ipynb file from the archive and use it in place of your existing file.

Luca and I always want you to have a great experience with our book, so keep those emails coming. Please let me know if you have any questions about source code file update at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. I’m sorry about any errors that appear in the downloadable source and appreciate the readers who have pointed them out.

 

Python for Data Science for Dummies Errata on Page 145

Python for Data Science for Dummies contains two errors on page 145. The first error appears in the second paragraph on that page. You can safely disregard the sentence that reads, “The use_idf controls the use of inverse-document-frequency reweighting, which is turned off in this case.” The code doesn’t contain a reference to the use_idf parameter. However, you can read about it on the Scikit-Learn site. This parameter defaults to being turned on, which is how it’s used for the example.

The second error is also in the second paragraph. The discussion references the tf_transformer.transform() method call. The actual method call is tfidf.transform(), which does appear in the sample code. The discussion about how the method works is correct, just the name of the object is wrong.

Please let me know if you have any questions about either of these changes at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. I’m sorry about any errors that appear in the book and appreciate the readers who have pointed them out.

 

Python for Data Science for Dummies Errata on Page 124

Python for Data Science for Dummies contains an error in the example that appears on the top half of page 124. In the first of the two grey boxes, the code computes the results of four print statements. The bottom-most print statement, print x[1:2, 1:2], is supposed to compute a result based on rows 1 and 2 of columns 1 and 2, and the bottom grey box seems to confirm that interpretation by the showing the result as [[[14 15 16] [17 18 19]] [[24 25 26] [27 28 29]]]. However, the answer provided for this example in the downloadable source code is [[[14 15 16]]], which doesn’t agree with that in the text.

The good news is that the downloadable source contains the correct code. The error appears only in the book. The last print statement in the book is wrong. Here is the correct code (with output) for this example:

x = np.array([[[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9],],
 [[11,12,13], [14,15,16], [17,18,19],],
 [[21,22,23], [24,25,26], [27,28,29]]])

print x[1,1]
print x[:,1,1]
print x[1,:,1]
print
print x[1:3, 1:3]
[14 15 16]
[ 5 15 25]
[12 15 18]

[[[14 15 16]
 [17 18 19]]

[[24 25 26]
 [27 28 29]]]

Please let me know if you have any questions about this example at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. I’m sorry about the error that appears in the book and appreciate the readers who have pointed it out.

 

Getting the Fastest Question Response

I always want to be sure that you get fast, courteous responses to your book-specific questions. Even though I don’t check my e-mail every day, I do check it most days of the week, so that’s the fastest way to contact me regarding issues that you have with my books. Of course, you can make the response even faster by doing a few simple things when sending your email:

  • Be sure to include the name of the book and the book edition in the message subject line.
  • Tell me which page, figure, or listing number to look at in the book.
  • Document the steps you took.
  • Provide me with the exact error message you’re seeing.
  • Tell me about your platform (operating system, the version of any software you’re using, and so on).

If you provide these basic pieces of information, I can usually answer your questions much faster—often without asking for additional information. E-mail communication can be difficult at times because it lacks that in person body language element and you can’t show me what you’re seeing on your machine. Remote diagnostics are harder than you might think.

It’s also important that you understand that I focus on book-specific questions. I’ve discussed this issue before in Sending Comments on My Books and Sending Comments and Asking Questions. The bottom line is that I want you to be happy with your book experience, but I also don’t have time to provide free consulting. Please let me know if you have any questions or concerns about contacting me at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

Missing XMLData2.xml File

A number of readers have written to report that XMLData2.xml is missing from the downloadable source for Python for Data Science for Dummies. You encounter this file in Chapter 6, on page 108. The publisher has already added the file to the downloadable source, but you might be missing the file from your copy. If so, you can download it by clicking XMLData2.zip. I’m truly sorry about any problems that the missing file might have caused. Please be sure to let me know about your book specific question at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

Security for Web Developers Released!

My Security for Web Developers book is released and ready for your review! I’m really excited about this book because I was able to explore security in a number of new ways. In addition, I had more technical editor support than just about any other book I’ve written and benefited from the insights of a larger than usual number of beta readers as well. Of course, the success of this book depends on you, the reader, and what I really want to hear is from you. What do you think about this latest book? Do you have any questions about it? Please feel free to contact me about it at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

Of course, I’m sure you want to know more about the book before you buy it. Amazon has the usual write-up, which is helpful, but you can also find insights in the beta reader request for this book. Make sure you also check out the blog posts that are already available for this book in the Security for Web Developers category. These value added posts will help you better understand what the book has to offer. More importantly, you get a better idea of what my writing style is like and whether it matches your needs by reading these posts.

Make sure you also get the source code for this book from the O’Reilly site. I highly recommend using the downloadable source, rather than type the code by hand. Typing the code by hand often leads to errors that reduces your ability to learn really cool new techniques. If you encounter errors with the downloaded source, make sure you have the source code placed correctly on your system. When you get to the O’Reilly download page you also find links for viewing the Catalog Page for this book and reporting Errata.

Have fun with my latest book! I’m really looking forward to hearing your comments. Thank you, in advance, for your continued support.