Beta Readers Needed for Amazon Web Services for Admins for Dummies

I still remember Amazon Web Services (AWS) when it was simply a method for getting information about Amazon products, making sales, and getting product status. The original web service didn’t do much, but people absolutely loved it, so it continued to evolve. Amazon has put a lot of work into AWS since that humble beginning and now you can perform all sorts of tasks that have nothing to do with buying or selling anything. You can create an entire IT structure for your organization that doesn’t involve any of the micromanagement, hardware purchases, software purchases, and other issues that kept IT from doing what it was supposed to do in the past—serving user needs in the most efficient manner possible.

There are a number of AWS books either published or currently in the process of being published, but these books don’t really answer the one question that everyone appears to be asking in the forums online, “How do I get started?” Most of the titles out there right now answer questions for a specific group after that group has installed the product and gotten started with it. AWS is immense and is naturally intimidating. Unfortunately, the getting started documentation from Amazon is incomplete, outdated, and hard to understand. Amazon Web Services for Admins for Dummies helps administrators (the focus group) and others (such as DevOps and developers) get started so that they can actually make use of that next level up book. Here are the sorts of things you see covered in the book:

  • Part I: Uncovering the AWS Landscape
    • Chapter 1: Starting Your AWS Adventure
    • Chapter 2: Obtaining Free Amazon Services
    • Chapter 3: Determining Which Services to Use
  • Part II: Configuring a Virtual Server
    • Chapter 4: Creating a Virtual Server Using EC2
    • Chapter 5: Managing Web Apps Using Elastic Beanstalk
    • Chapter 6: Responding to Events with Lambda
  • Part III: Working with Storage
    • Chapter 7: Working with Cloud Storage Using S3
    • Chapter 8: Managing Files Using Elastic File System
    • Chapter 9: Archiving Data Using Glacier
  • Part IV: Performing Basic Database Management
    • Chapter 10: Getting Basic DBMS Using RDS
    • Chapter 11: Moving Data Using Database Migration Service
    • Chapter 12: Gaining NoSQL Access Using DynamoDB
  • Part V: Interacting with Networks
    • Chapter 13: Isolating Cloud Resources Using Virtual Private Cloud
    • Chapter 14: Connecting Directly to AWS with Direct Connect
  • Part VI: Getting Free Software
    • Chapter 15: Using the Infrastructure Software
    • Chapter 16: Supporting Users with Business Software
  • Part VII: The Part of Tens
    • Chapter 17: Ten Ways to Deploy AWS Quickly
    • Chapter 18: Ten Must Have AWS Software Packages

As you can see, this book is going to give you a good start in working with AWS by helping you with the basics. Because of the subject matter, I really want to avoid making any errors in this book, which is where you come into play. I’m looking for beta readers who want to use AWS to perform basic administration tasks, even when those tasks are related to a home office. In fact, I have a strong interest in trying to meet the needs of the small-to-medium sized business (SMB) because many of the other books out there cover the enterprise to the exclusion of these smaller entities. As a beta reader, you get to see the material as I write it. Your comments will help me improve the text and make it easier to use.

As you can see from the outline, Amazon Web Services (AWS) is actually a huge array of services that can affect consumers, Small to Medium Sized Business (SMB), and enterprises. Using AWS, you can do everything from back up your personal hard drive to creating a full-fledged IT department in the cloud. The installed base is immense. You can find case studies of companies like Adobe and Netflix that use AWS at https://aws.amazon.com/solutions/case-studies/. AWS use isn’t just for private companies either—even the government is involved. That’s why Amazon Web Services for Admins for Dummies has a somewhat narrowly focused audience and emphasizes a specific set of tasks that it will help you perform. Otherwise, a single book couldn’t even begin to cover the topic.

In consideration of your time and effort, your name will appear in the Acknowledgements (unless you specifically request that we not provide it). You also get to read the book free of charge. Being a beta reader is both fun and educational. If you have any interest in reviewing this book, please contact me at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com and will fill in all the details for you.

 

Facing the Blank Page

Most writers face writer’s block at some point. You have a blank page that’s waiting for you to fill it and you have a vague notion of what you want to say, but the text simply doesn’t come out right. So, you write, and write some more, and write still more, and hours later you still have a blank page. Yes, you’ve written many words during that time—all of them good words—just not the right words.

Every piece of writing I do starts with an outline. Even my articles start with an outline. Creating outlines help you focus your thoughts. More importantly, they help you to see how your thoughts will flow from one idea to the next. Sometimes, if you’re honest with yourself, you’ll discover that you really don’t have anything more than a vague idea that will never become an article, white paper, book, or some other piece of writing. Of course, that’s really the reason for this exercise—to see if you have enough information to even begin writing. If you don’t have enough information, then you need to research your topic more. Research can take all sorts of forms that include everyone from reading other texts on the topic, to doing interviews, to playing. That’s right, even playing is an essential part of the writer’s toolbox, but this is a kind of practical play that has specific goals.

Once you do have an outline and you’re certain that the outline will work, you need to mark it up. My outlines often contain links to resources that I want to emphasize while I write (or at least use as sources of inspiration). A lot of writers take this approach because again, it helps focus your thoughts. However, an outline should also contain other kinds of information. For example, if a particular section is supposed to elicit a particular emotion, then make sure you document it. You should also include information from your proposal (book goals) and your reader profile (who will read a particular section) in the outline. Your marked up outline will help you understand just what it is that you really want to write. In reading your outline, you can start to see holes in the coverage, logic errors, and ideas that simply don’t fit.

Moving your outline entries to the blank page will help you start the writing process. Convert the entries to headings and subheadings. Ensure that the presentation of the headings and subheadings is consistent with the piece as a whole. Unfortunately, you can still end up with writer’s block. Yes, now you have some good words on the page, but no real content. An outline is simply a synopsis of your ideas in a formalized presentation after all.

Write the introduction and the summary to the piece next. The introduction is an advertisement designed to entice the reader into moving forward. However, it also acts as a starting point. The summary doesn’t just summarize the material in the piece—it provides the reader with direction on what to do next. People should view a good summary as a call to action. By creating the introduction and the summary, you create the starting and ending points for your piece—the content starts to become a matter of drawing a line between the two from a writing perspective.

At this point, you have enough material that you could possibly ask for help. Try reading your piece to someone else. Reading material aloud uses a different part of the brain than reading the same material silently. Discussing the material with someone else places a different emphasis on the material. The other party can sometimes provide good suggestions. You may not use the suggestions directly, but listening carefully can often present you with creative ideas that you wouldn’t have considered otherwise.

It’s important not to overwork the piece. Sometimes you need to do something else for a while. Yes, you always want to spend time in research and thinking your piece through, some writing is often done in the subconscious. Fill your head up with as many creative ideas, fascinating thoughts, and facts that you can, and then do something that actually will take your conscious mind off the topic. You might watch a television show or movie, go for a while. have coffee with a friend, take a nap, or do any of a number of other things. The important thing is to forget about the book for a while. Often, you’ll find that the now semi-blank page doesn’t present a problem when you return. Let me hear about your ideas for dealing with the blank page at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

Beta Readers Needed for Machine Learning for Dummies

Do machines really learn, or do they simply give the appearance of learning? What does it actually mean to learn and why would a machine want to do it? Some people are saying that computers will eventually learn in the same manner that children do. However, before we get to that point, it’s important to answer these basic questions and consider the implications of creating machines that can learn.

Like many seemingly new technologies, machine learning actually has its basis in existing technologies. I initially studied about artificial intelligence in 1986 and it had been around for a long time before that. Many of the statistical equations that machine learning relies upon have been around literally for centuries. It’s the application of the technology that differs. Machine learning has the potential to change the way in which the world works. A computer can experience its environment and learn how to avoid making mistakes without any human intervention. By using machine learning techniques, computers can also discover new things and even add new functionality. The computer is at the center of it all, but the computer output affects the actions of machines, such as robots. In reality, the computer learns, but the machine as a whole benefits.

Machine Learning for Dummies assumes that you have at least some math skills and a few programming skills as well. However, you do get all the basics you need to understand and use machine learning as a new way to make computers (and the machines they control) do more. While working through Machine Learning for Dummies you discover these topics:

  • Part I: Introducing How Machines Learn
    • Chapter 1: Getting the Real Story about AI
    • Chapter 2: Learning in the Age of Big Data
    • Chapter 3: Having a Glance at the Future
  • Part II: Preparing Your Learning Tools

    • Chapter 4: Installing a R Distribution
    • Chapter 5: Coding in R Using RStudio
    • Chapter 6: Installing a Python Distribution
    • Chapter 7: Coding in Python Using Anaconda
    • Chapter 8: Exploring Other Machine Learning Tools
  • Part III: Getting Started with the Math Basics

    • Chapter 9: Demystifying the Math behind Machine Learning
    • Chapter 10: Descending the Right Curve
    • Chapter 11: Validating Machine Learning
    • Chapter 12: Starting with Simple Learners
  • Part IV: Learning from Smart and Big Data
    • Chapter 13: Preprocessing Data
    • Chapter 14: Leveraging Similarity
    • Chapter 15: Starting Easy with Linear Models
    • Chapter 16: Hitting Complexity with Neural Networks
    • Chapter 17: Going a Step Beyond using Support Vector Machines
    • Chapter 18: Resorting to Ensembles of Learners
  • Part V: Applying Learning to Real Problems
    • Chapter 19: Classifying Images
    • Chapter 20: Scoring Opinions and Sentiments
    • Chapter 21: Recommending Products and Movies
  • Part VI: The Part of Tens
    • Chapter 22: Ten Machine Learning Packages to Master
    • Chapter 23: Ten Ways to Improve Your Machine Learning Models
    • Online: Ten Ways to Use Machine Learning in Your Organization

As you can see, this book is going to give you a good start in working with machine learning. Because of the subject matter, I really want to avoid making any errors in book, which is where you come into play. I’m looking for beta readers who use math, statistics, or computer science as part of their profession and think they might be able to benefit from the techniques that data science and/or machine learning provide. As a beta reader, you get to see the material as Luca and I write it. Your comments will help us improve the text and make it easier to use.

In consideration of your time and effort, your name will appear in the Acknowledgements (unless you specifically request that we not provide it). You also get to read the book free of charge. Being a beta reader is both fun and educational. If you have any interest in reviewing this book, please contact me at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com and will fill in all the details for you.

 

Beta Readers Needed for Security for Web Developers

Are you worried about your web-based applications, web services, and other web endeavors? Web security becomes a more serious problem on an almost daily basis as witnessed by the surge of truly serious hacking events, so developers are looking for a reference they can use to avoid becoming yet another statistic. Many books give you good advice about part of the security problem or provide solutions so generic they aren’t truly useful. Unfortunately, attacking only part of the problem leaves you open to hacking or other security issues. Developers also need specific advice because general advice will no longer meet current security needs. Security for Web Developers provides specific advice for the HTML5, JavaScript, and CSS developer on all areas of security, including new areas not found in any other book, such as microservices. Consequently, you get a complete view of security changes needed to protect web-based code and keep its data safe. Here’s what you’ll see in this book:

  • Part I: Developing a Security Plan
    • Chapter 1: Defining the Application Environment
    • Chapter 2: Embracing User Needs and Expectations
    • Chapter 3: Getting Third Party Assistance
  • Part II: Applying Successful Coding Practices
    • Chapter 4: Developing Successful Interfaces
    • Chapter 5: Building Reliable Code
    • Chapter 6: Incorporating Libraries
    • Chapter 7: Using APIs with Care
    • Chapter 8: Considering the Use of Microservices
  • Part III: Creating Useful and Efficient Testing Strategies
    • Chapter 9: Thinking Like a Hacker
    • Chapter 10: Creating an API Sandbox
    • Chapter 11: Checking Libraries and APIs for Holes
    • Chapter 12: Using Third Party Testing
  • Part IV: Implementing a Maintenance Cycle
    • Chapter 13: Clearly Defining Upgrade Cycles
    • Chapter 14: Considering Update Options
    • Chapter 15: Considering the Need for Reports
  • Part V: Locating Security Resources
    • Chapter 16: Tracking Current Security Threats
    • Chapter 17: Getting Required Training

This book is designed to meet the needs of a wide group of professionals and non-developers will definitely find it useful. If your job title is web designer, front end developer, UI designer, UX designer, interaction designer, art director, content strategist, dev ops, product manager, SEO specialist, data scientist, software engineer, or computer scientist, then you definitely need this book. I’d love to have your input on it as a beta reader because this book is meant to meet your needs. However, even people with other job specialties should send me an e-mail about reading the book because other perspectives are most definitely helpful!

As always, I want your input to help avoid making any errors in the book. If you have any desire whatsoever to work with any sort of web-based code, please contact me at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. In consideration of your time and effort, your name will appear in the Acknowledgements (unless you specifically request that I not provide it). You also get to read the book free of charge. Being a beta reader is both fun and educational.

 

Beta Readers Needed for Python for Data Science for Dummies

Data science is the act of extracting knowledge from data. This may seem like a foreign concept at first, but you use data science all the time in your daily life. When you see a pattern a sequence of numbers, your mind has actually used data science to perform the task. What data science does is quantify what you do normally and make it possible to apply the knowledge to all sorts of different technologies. For example, robots use data science to discover objects in their surroundings.

Of course, data science is used for all sorts of applications. For example, data science is used with big data to perform tasks such as data mining or to predict trends based on various data sources. The fact that your browser predicts what you might buy based on previous purchases rests on data science. Even your doctor relies on data science to predict the outcome of a certain series of medications on a illness you might have.

Even though data science first appears easy to categorize, it’s actually huge and quite difficult to pin down. It relies on the inputs of three disciplines: computer science, mathematics, and statistics. There are all sorts of sub-disciplines used as well. Because of the depth and width of knowledge required, a data scientist often works as part of a team to tease out the meanings behind the data provided to solve a problem.

Python for Data Science for Dummies provides you with a beginning view of data science through the computer science discipline using a specific language, Python. The capabilities of Python as a language make it a perfect choice for this book. While reading this book, you’ll see these topics explained:

  • Part I: Getting Started with Data Science & Python
    • Chapter 1: Discovering the Match between Data Science and Python
    • Chapter 2: Introducing Python Capabilities and Wonders
    • Chapter 3: Setting Up Python for Data Science
    • Chapter 4: Reviewing Basic Python
  • Part II: Getting Your Hands Dirty with Data
    • Chapter 5: Working with Real Data
    • Chapter 6: Getting Your Data in Shape
    • Chapter 7: Shaping Data
    • Chapter 8: Putting What You Know in Action
  • Part III: Visualizing the Invisible (2 Pages)
    • Chapter 9: Getting a Crash Course in MatPlotLib
    • Chapter 10: Visualizing the Data
    • Chapter 11: Understanding Interactive Graphical and Computing Practice
  • Part IV: Wrangling Data
    • Chapter 12: Stretching Python’s Capabilities
    • Chapter 13: Exploring Data Analysis
    • Chapter 14: Reducing Dimensionality
    • Chapter 15: Clustering
    • Chapter 16: Detecting Outliers in Data
  • Part V: Learning from Data
    • Chapter 17: Exploring Four Simple and Effective Algorithms
    • Chapter 18: Performing Cross Validation, Selection and Optimization
    • Chapter 19: Increasing Complexity with Linear and Non-linear Tricks
    • Chapter 20: Understanding the Power of the Many
  • Part VI: Parts of Ten
    • Chapter 21: Ten Essential Data Resources
    • Chapter 22: Ten Data Challenges You Should Take

As you can see, this book is going to give you a good start in working with data science. Because of the subject matter, I really want to avoid making any errors in book, which is where you come into play. I’m looking for beta readers who use math, statistics, or computer science as part of their profession and think they might be able to benefit from the techniques that data science provides. As a beta reader, you get to see the material as Luca and I write it. Your comments will help us improve the text and make it easier to use.

In consideration of your time and effort, your name will appear in the Acknowledgements (unless you specifically request that we not provide it). You also get to read the book free of charge. Being a beta reader is both fun and educational. If you have any interest in reviewing this book, please contact me at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com and will fill in all the details for you.

 

Expressions of Gratitude

As this year ends, I realize just how much has happened and how much I’ve grown as a person. The turmoil actually began when my wife became ill over six years ago, but intensified when she died in April. Since that time I’ve had to answer a lot of questions about my life and how it would change without Rebecca in it. Some answers are coming, some are still unknown, and a few have been satisfied. The most important question I had is whether my friends would be there to support me during this trying time and they’ve been more than up to the challenge. It’s good to have people you can rely upon to help keep the blog posts written, the books and articles in process, and the new fields of endeavor in progress. It would be impossible for me to name everything my friends have done for me and I wouldn’t even try. All I can do is express my extreme gratitude for them and hope they know how much they mean to me.

I’ve talked many times about how self-sufficiency is more about trying to do things on your own in as much as possible, but then realizing that no one can make it completely alone. Self-sufficiency can and does go wrong when people think that it means living like a hermit away from all human contact. Yes, I’m self-sufficient in many ways, but I’m also smart enough to know that I depend on others for help when needed. Getting that help is one thing—ensuring they know how much their help means is quite another. Expressing gratitude, even for the seemingly simple things, is an essential part of the self-sufficiency experience. It’s not possible to go wrong when you’re grateful for the help you receive.

As this year ends, I hope that you’re truly grateful for all of the small ways in which people have helped you this last year and every year to come. More importantly, I hope that you’ll actually take the time to thank your helpers in person, through a phone call, or by sending them a card (or possibly all three). The people you can count on, those few true friends in your life, are more important than anything else here on earth.

With this in mind, I also want to take time in this post to thank all my readers.  Every purchase you’ve made has helped keep me in business so that I can continue helping others. Every question you’ve asked has helped me produce better materials. The gracious contributions of my beta readers have been appreciated most of all. Goodbye to the old year; happy new year one and all!

 

Beta Readers Needed for Build Your Own PC on a Budget

There is a certain excitement about building your own system. You decide what hardware should go into the box and you decide how everything should be put together. A lot of people would like to have more control over how their system is configured, which is why I decided to write Build Your Own PC on a Budget. This book is intended for anyone who wants to build their own system. You don’t have to have prior hardware experience; although, the ability to use basic tools will most definitely help.

Of course, you might wonder what the purpose would be of building your own system. After all, you can go to just about any store or shop online and get a decent computer for almost nothing today. The systems you get in the store are built using the least expensive components available for the most part, unless you go to a “boutique store” such as Alienware, where you’ll pay through the nose for the system you really wanted. Building your own system means that you can pick and choose which components to emphasize for your particular needs. In fact, you can add non-standard parts to your system so that it can do more than most off-the-shelf computers can do. The point is that you can make this system however you want it to look without anyone placing any limits on what you can do.

The point of this book is to help you create a system that meets your needs, allows for future expansion, and still won’t break the bank. That’s a tall order, but this book will help you make the sorts of decisions you need to make in order to create such a system. You’ll find these topics discussed in the book.

  • Part I: Developing a PC Plan
    • Chapter 1: Defining What You Want
    • Chapter 2: Introducing the Major Parts
    • Chapter 3: Considering the Vendors
    • Chapter 4: Getting What You Need
  • Part II: Building the Hardware
    • Chapter 5: Installing the Motherboard
    • Chapter 6: Adding RAM and Processor
    • Chapter 7: Providing Video
    • Chapter 8: Mounting Permanent Storage
    • Chapter 9: Attaching Auxiliary Devices
  • Part III: Considering Networks
    • Chapter 10: Installing a LAN
    • Chapter 11: Connecting to the Internet
    • Chapter 12: Accessing Wireless Devices
  • Part IV: Installing the Software
    • Chapter 13: Installing the Operating System
    • Chapter 14: Accessing the Devices
    • Chapter 15: Choosing Applications
  • Part V: Performing Maintenance
    • Chapter 16: Maintaining the Hardware
    • Chapter 17: Managing the Software
    • Chapter 18: Preparing for Updates

As always, I want your input to help avoid making any errors in the book. If you have any desire whatsoever to build your own system from scratch, please contact me at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. In consideration of your time and effort, your name will appear in the Acknowledgements (unless you specifically request that we not provide it). You also get to read the book free of charge. Being a beta reader is both fun and educational.

 

Beta Readers Needed for MATLAB for Dummies

Math is the basis for a good many human endeavors and we often use it without thinking about it. For example, when you go to the store to buy groceries, the clerk who checks you out relies on math to compute how much you owe. Perhaps you also used math as you shopped to ensure that you didn’t go over your budget. In addition, you might have used math to convert one unit of measure to another so that you’d know how much of a particular item to get. In looking at two similar products, you used math to decide which one offered a better deal. You get the idea. It truly isn’t possible to perform even the simplest task without using math in some way.

As the use of math for performing a task becomes more complex, so does the need for precision, accuracy, and an understanding of how math works. MATLAB is a product designed to help people perform complex math tasks more efficiently, accurately, and with less effort. In addition, you obtain a level of precision that only a computer can provide consistently. However, MATLAB itself is somewhat complex, which is why I’m writing MATLAB for Dummies with my coauthor Jim Sizemore (The Fun Physicist who has extensive MATLAB experience). The two of us want to make your MATLAB experience fun and interesting. With this in mind, we’ve put together the following outline:

 

  • Part I: Getting Started With MATLAB
    • Chapter 1: Introducing MATLAB and its Many Uses
    • Chapter 2: Starting Your Copy of MATLAB
    • Chapter 3: Interacting with MATLAB
    • Chapter 4: Starting, Storing, and Saving MATLAB Files
  • Part II: Manipulating and Plotting Data in MATLAB
    • Chapter 5: Embracing Vectors, Matrices, and Higher Dimensions
    • Chapter 6: Understanding Plotting Basics
    • Chapter 7: Using Advanced Plotting Features
  • Part III: Streamlining MATLAB
    • Chapter 8: Automating Your Work
    • Chapter 9: Expanding MATLAB’s Power with Functions
    • Chapter 10: Adding Structure to Your Scripts
  • Part IV: Employing Advanced MATLAB Techniques
    • Chapter 11: Importing and Exporting Data
    • Chapter 12: Printing and Publishing Your Work
    • Chapter 13: Recovering from Mistakes
  • Part V: Specific MATLAB Applications
    • Chapter 14: Solving Equations and Finding Roots
    • Chapter 15: Performing Analysis
    • Chapter 16: Creating Super Plots
  • Part VI: Part of Tens
    • Chapter 17: Top Ten Uses of MATLAB
    • Chapter 18: Ten Ways to Make a Living Using MATLAB
  • Appendix A: MATLAB’s Functions
  • Appendix B: MATLAB’s Plotting Routines
  • Appendix C: Geometry, Pre-calculus, and Trigonometry Review


As you can see, this book is going to give you a good start in using all the functionality that MATLAB has to offer. Because of the subject matter, I really want to avoid making any errors in book, which is where you come into play. I’m looking for beta readers who use math as part of their profession and think they might be able to benefit from the functionality that MATLAB provides. As a beta reader, you get to see the material as Jim and I write it. Your comments will help us improve the text and make it easier to use.

In consideration of your time and effort, your name will appear in the Acknowledgements (unless you specifically request that we not provide it). You also get to read the book free of charge. Being a beta reader is both fun and educational. If you have any interest in reviewing this book, please contact me at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com and will fill in all the details for you.

 

Beta Readers Needed for Beginning Programming with Python For Dummies

I’m starting a new book project entitled, Beginning Programming with Python For Dummies. Python is a really neat language and it’s used for all sorts of commercial tasks. The main benefits of using Python are that the code is succinct, it’s easy to read, and it’s easy to learn.

This book is intended for someone who has never written any code before. The focus of the book is to make things simple and easy to understand, so if you’re already a Python developer, you probably won’t find too much in the way of new information. Here is a list of the topics you’ll find in my book as you read:

 

  • Part I: Getting Started
    • Chapter 1: Talking to Your Computer
    • Chapter 2: Getting Your Own Copy of Python
    • Chapter 3: Interacting with Python
    • Chapter 4: Writing Your First Application
  • Part II: Talking the Talk
    • Chapter 5: Storing and Modifying Information
    • Chapter 6: Managing Information
    • Chapter 7: Making Decisions
    • Chapter 8: Performing Tasks Repetitively
    • Chapter 9: Dealing with Errors
  • Part III: Performing Common Tasks
    • Chapter 10: Interacting with Modules
    • Chapter 11: Working with Strings
    • Chapter 12: Managing Lists
    • Chapter 13: Collecting All Sorts of Data
    • Chapter 14: Creating and Using Classes
  • Part IV: Performing Advanced Tasks
    • Chapter 15: Storing Data in Files
    • Chapter 16: Sending an Email
  • Part V: Part of Tens
    • Chapter 17: Ten Amazing Programming Resources
    • Chapter 18: Ten Ways to Make a Living with Python
    • Chapter 19: Ten Interesting Tools
    • Chapter 20: Ten Libraries You Need to Know About


As you can see, this is a really useful book for the novice. By the time you complete this book, you’ll be able to perform some useful tasks with Python and you’ll be able to read other books without the usual head shaking and complete frustration. The goal isn’t to turn you into an expert, but to reduce the learning curve so that you can actually follow other texts that you might want to use.

This isn’t a platform specific book. It doesn’t matter whether you work with a Mac, Linux, or Windows. I’m looking for people from all walks of life and my only expectation is that you know how to perform essential tasks with your platform of choice, such as install applications and work as an administrator on that system.

Of course, I still want to avoid making any errors in the book if at all possible. That’s where you come into play. The biggest complaint people have about computer books is that they’re obviously written by an expert and not the people reading them. I take all of the input from the beta readers to avoid that sort of problem. In addition, beta readers often find errors that other people miss. In short, you’re an incredibly important part of the writing process.

As part of being a beta
reader, your name will appear in the book Acknowledgements (unless you
specially ask that I don’t provide it). However, one of the bigger
benefits to you is that you get to read the book free of charge and gain
the skills that it can provide for you. Imagine what learning a new
programming language can do for your career. Even if you don’t need Python
for work, you can use what you gain to create applications for your own
needs and to obtain a better understanding of how computers work. Just contact me at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com if you’d like to work with me on this project.

 

Beta Readers Needed for a C++ Book Update

A lot of people (892 so far) have sent me e-mail about C++ All-In-One Desk Reference For Dummies. A few more have commented online and some of you have written reviews as well. In fact, it’s one of the more popular books I’ve written to date. I keep statistics on every message I receive so that I can better understand how a book is succeeding and how it has failed. For example, I know that most readers like CodeBlocks, but they wish my book used a newer version of the product. Don’t worry, the updated book will use the latest CodeBlocks release. I’ve also discovered that none of you apparently uses the Microsoft-specific materials in Book VII—this information will be replaced with something you do want in this next edition. All of the examples will also be tested on the Mac, Windows, and Linux platforms to ensure it works well no matter what platform you use.

Naturally, everything that requires an update in the book will get updated. I’ll also look at the latest specification and determine what sorts of new topics might interest you. However, I really do need your input. Only you actually know what you’d like to see in an updated book and I’m determined to find out what that is. You can help me shape the updated book by writing me at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com with your ideas and suggestions. Don’t wait until later, write me today!

Even better, why don’t you become a beta reader? You’re under no obligation to read the entire book. I’ll send you the chapters as I write them and it’s entirely up to you to send them back with comments. I’ll never bug you for comments. Any comments you do send will receive careful consideration and I’ll modify everything I can as I go through the Author Review (AR) process where I incorporate editor comments as well. By being a beta reader, you get to shape the book content and get precisely the book you’d like. Make sure you sign up to be a beta reader today.

As part of being a beta reader, your name will appear in the book Acknowledgements (unless you specially ask that I don’t provide it). However, one of the bigger benefits to you is that you get to read the book free of charge and gain the skills that it can provide for you. Imagine what learning a new programming language can do for your career. Even if you don’t need C++ for work, you can use what you gain to create applications for your own needs and to obtain a better understanding of how computers work.

Many people are concerned that they don’t qualify to be a beta reader, but that’s not the case at all. You don’t need to know anything about C++ or programming for that matter to be a beta reader for this book. All you need is a desire to learn how to use C++ to develop simple applications. It really is that simple.