Use of the title Attribute

I try to keep up with accessibility issues so that the content I provide is always as friendly as possible. With this in mind, I’ve used the title attribute for links and wherever else it might be needed for many years now. At one time, the title attribute was actually mandated to make pages accessible by organizations such as the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). The attribute also makes an appearance in a number of my books, such as Accessibility for Everybody: Understanding the Section 508 Accessibility Requirements with full documentation as to the benefits of using it.

However, today I find myself having to take a new direction and actually tell people not to use the title attribute because it could potentially make pages less accessible. Part of the reason that the title attribute isn’t used anymore is that some people became confused about it and started using it for Search Engine Optimization (SEO) uses and that was never the point. A lack of browser support and all sorts of other issues added to the demise of the title attribute as a useful link feature. The point is that there is a reason for the title attribute, but no one was using it and people with special accessibility needs found ways around it. At one point, the screen readers I used actually did make use of the title attribute, but newer screen readers don’t. In fact, the new approach is to ensure that links contain enough text to ensure someone with a screen reader knows what they mean. It’s a situation where a specific programming technique didn’t get the job done so another technique is now in use—one that seems more natural and that people are actually using.

So, what cued me into the fact that the title attribute is no longer particularly useful? Well, I use WordPress to create blog posts and noted recently that they had removed the title attribute from the dialog box for creating links. For a while I was adding the title attribute in by hand because I really did feel I was making the page more accessible. However, after talking with a friend about the issue and experimenting with the latest screen readers myself, I find that the title attribute is one of those “also ran” features that simply doesn’t see use often enough to make it worthwhile using. The new strategy is to ensure you provide enough text as part of your link to ensure the link is clear all by itself (even if you need to hide part of that text from view). If you have a copy of one of my books that espouses the use of the title attribute, make sure you change your practice to match what the rest of the world is doing today. Let me know if you have any questions about the use of the title attribute at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

Beta Readers Needed for Security for Web Developers

Are you worried about your web-based applications, web services, and other web endeavors? Web security becomes a more serious problem on an almost daily basis as witnessed by the surge of truly serious hacking events, so developers are looking for a reference they can use to avoid becoming yet another statistic. Many books give you good advice about part of the security problem or provide solutions so generic they aren’t truly useful. Unfortunately, attacking only part of the problem leaves you open to hacking or other security issues. Developers also need specific advice because general advice will no longer meet current security needs. Security for Web Developers provides specific advice for the HTML5, JavaScript, and CSS developer on all areas of security, including new areas not found in any other book, such as microservices. Consequently, you get a complete view of security changes needed to protect web-based code and keep its data safe. Here’s what you’ll see in this book:

  • Part I: Developing a Security Plan
    • Chapter 1: Defining the Application Environment
    • Chapter 2: Embracing User Needs and Expectations
    • Chapter 3: Getting Third Party Assistance
  • Part II: Applying Successful Coding Practices
    • Chapter 4: Developing Successful Interfaces
    • Chapter 5: Building Reliable Code
    • Chapter 6: Incorporating Libraries
    • Chapter 7: Using APIs with Care
    • Chapter 8: Considering the Use of Microservices
  • Part III: Creating Useful and Efficient Testing Strategies
    • Chapter 9: Thinking Like a Hacker
    • Chapter 10: Creating an API Sandbox
    • Chapter 11: Checking Libraries and APIs for Holes
    • Chapter 12: Using Third Party Testing
  • Part IV: Implementing a Maintenance Cycle
    • Chapter 13: Clearly Defining Upgrade Cycles
    • Chapter 14: Considering Update Options
    • Chapter 15: Considering the Need for Reports
  • Part V: Locating Security Resources
    • Chapter 16: Tracking Current Security Threats
    • Chapter 17: Getting Required Training

This book is designed to meet the needs of a wide group of professionals and non-developers will definitely find it useful. If your job title is web designer, front end developer, UI designer, UX designer, interaction designer, art director, content strategist, dev ops, product manager, SEO specialist, data scientist, software engineer, or computer scientist, then you definitely need this book. I’d love to have your input on it as a beta reader because this book is meant to meet your needs. However, even people with other job specialties should send me an e-mail about reading the book because other perspectives are most definitely helpful!

As always, I want your input to help avoid making any errors in the book. If you have any desire whatsoever to work with any sort of web-based code, please contact me at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. In consideration of your time and effort, your name will appear in the Acknowledgements (unless you specifically request that I not provide it). You also get to read the book free of charge. Being a beta reader is both fun and educational.