Internet of Things (IoT) Security Issues

In the past, I discussed how the Internet of Things (IoT) could eventually cause a wealth of problems on the Internet, including security breaches, in a number of my books and articles. Some of my strongest warnings came in Build Your Own PC on a Budget and Security for Web Developers, but I included warnings in other places as well. Unfortunately, the worst case scenario has occurred according to the ComputerWorld article, Armies of hacked IoT devices launch unprecedented DDoS attacks. Yes, your DVR or smart television might have turned into a zombie at this point and now works for someone else committing crimes. All it takes is a little negligence on your part and your device will take a walk on the dark side.

The article is worthwhile reading because the statistics sound like something out of a bad science fiction novel. If anything, my warnings were too tame and I should have used my imagination a bit more in exploring just how bad things could get. Yet, I’ve received e-mail from readers who found the warnings I did provide barely believable. It didn’t seem possible that something as simple as the router installed to provide broadband support for your digital telephone could possibly cause any sort of problem. After all, your old telephone system never went on the attack. The thing is, any device that connects to the Internet today probably has enough intelligence to do harm, especially the IoT devices that everyone assumes just work.

IoT devices are actually some of the best targets for hackers. The users who have them barely know how they work, have no clue that they should change the password, and wouldn’t care even if they could figure it out. After all, the goal is to see Sunday afternoon football, not to configure security for a device. Vendors share in the blame because anyone with even a modicum of common sense would know that users have no desire whatsoever to change device passwords. IoT devices should go out with a unique password printed in a place that the user can easily find on the device, should it ever become necessary to access the device (and it might not ever become necessary). If hackers faced a unique default password for every device, the IoT devices would likely remain relatively secure unless hackers could somehow figure a pattern out in the password assignments. Ensuring the unique password is printed on the device means the user won’t lose it.

It’s not as if changing IoT device passwords is easy anyway, so hackers have every reason to believe that the default password is still in place for the majority of these devices. A recent device purchase pointed out to me that some IoT devices view even password changes as unwelcome user fiddling—it took nearly 20 minutes of reading to discover how to change the password using an arcane set of remote control clicks. Until this situation changes, you must expect that hackers will continue to use IoT devices to perform various kinds of attacks and that device owners will continue to remain oblivious about their cherished device’s life of crime. Let me know your thoughts on IoT security at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.