Internet of Things (IoT) Security Issues

In the past, I discussed how the Internet of Things (IoT) could eventually cause a wealth of problems on the Internet, including security breaches, in a number of my books and articles. Some of my strongest warnings came in Build Your Own PC on a Budget and Security for Web Developers, but I included warnings in other places as well. Unfortunately, the worst case scenario has occurred according to the ComputerWorld article, Armies of hacked IoT devices launch unprecedented DDoS attacks. Yes, your DVR or smart television might have turned into a zombie at this point and now works for someone else committing crimes. All it takes is a little negligence on your part and your device will take a walk on the dark side.

The article is worthwhile reading because the statistics sound like something out of a bad science fiction novel. If anything, my warnings were too tame and I should have used my imagination a bit more in exploring just how bad things could get. Yet, I’ve received e-mail from readers who found the warnings I did provide barely believable. It didn’t seem possible that something as simple as the router installed to provide broadband support for your digital telephone could possibly cause any sort of problem. After all, your old telephone system never went on the attack. The thing is, any device that connects to the Internet today probably has enough intelligence to do harm, especially the IoT devices that everyone assumes just work.

IoT devices are actually some of the best targets for hackers. The users who have them barely know how they work, have no clue that they should change the password, and wouldn’t care even if they could figure it out. After all, the goal is to see Sunday afternoon football, not to configure security for a device. Vendors share in the blame because anyone with even a modicum of common sense would know that users have no desire whatsoever to change device passwords. IoT devices should go out with a unique password printed in a place that the user can easily find on the device, should it ever become necessary to access the device (and it might not ever become necessary). If hackers faced a unique default password for every device, the IoT devices would likely remain relatively secure unless hackers could somehow figure a pattern out in the password assignments. Ensuring the unique password is printed on the device means the user won’t lose it.

It’s not as if changing IoT device passwords is easy anyway, so hackers have every reason to believe that the default password is still in place for the majority of these devices. A recent device purchase pointed out to me that some IoT devices view even password changes as unwelcome user fiddling—it took nearly 20 minutes of reading to discover how to change the password using an arcane set of remote control clicks. Until this situation changes, you must expect that hackers will continue to use IoT devices to perform various kinds of attacks and that device owners will continue to remain oblivious about their cherished device’s life of crime. Let me know your thoughts on IoT security at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

Harvest Festival 2016

This has been an interesting year in the garden. In looking at the Harvest Festival 2015 post, I see a year that offered me what I would call the standard garden items. Not so this year. The problems began with a late frost that wiped out my grapes and pears. In fact, it nearly wiped out my apples as well, but I learned a curious lesson with the fruit this year because of the apples. All the outer apple trees had no fruit, but those in the center of the orchard did have some fruit. In other words, the trees on the outside protected those on the inside. I didn’t get a lot of fruit this year, but it isn’t a big deal because my larder is setup to provide multiple years’ worth of any particular item. The lesson I learned was not to prune too heavily when the weather is uncertain (as it was this year). In fact, the reason the apples survived as they did was because I didn’t have time to prune them much at all.

The garden also behaved quite oddly this year due to the weather. The Wisconsin winter was semi-mild this year without nearly as much snow as normal, so different bugs survived than normal. In addition, the weather was either hot or cold, without a lot of in between this summer. It has also been the fourth wettest summer on record. All these changes produced prodigious amounts of some insects that I don’t normally see and the vegetables didn’t produce as expected.

As an example of odd behavior, I normally have a hard time growing cauliflower. This year I grew huge cauliflower and one plant is attempting to grow a second head, which is something that never happens here. On the other hand, broccoli, a plant that always does well, didn’t even produce a head this year. All I got were some spikes that didn’t taste good (they were quite bitter). The rabbits didn’t even like them all that well. The cauliflower is usually plagued by all sorts of insects, but this year there was nary a bug to be seen. The point is that you need to grow a variety of vegetables because you can’t assume that old standbys will always produce as expected.

Two other examples of odd behavior are okra (which normally grows acceptably, but not great) and peppers (which often produce too well for their own good). This year I’m literally drowning in beautiful okra that gets pretty large without ever getting tough, but the peppers are literally rotting on the plant before they get large enough to pick. I’m not talking about a few peppers in just one location in the garden either—every pepper plant completely failed this year.

Location can be important and planting in multiple locations can help you get a crop even if other people are having problems (and I didn’t talk to a single gardener this year who didn’t have problems of one sort or another). One example in my case were potatoes. I planted six different varieties in six completely different locations in the garden. Five of those locations ended up not producing much of value. A combination of insects destroyed the plants and tubers. All I got for my efforts were rotting corpses where the potatoes should have been. The last area, with Pontiac Red potatoes, out produced any potato I’ve ever grown. The smallest potato I took out of this patch was a half pound and the largest was 1 ¼ pounds. I didn’t even find any of the usual smallish potatoes that I love to add to soup. The potatoes were incredibly crisp and flavorful. The odd thing is that this patch was in an area of the garden that doesn’t usually grow potatoes very well.

A few of my garden plantings didn’t seem to mind the weather or the bugs in the least. My peas did well, as did my carrots. I grew the carnival carrots again because the colors are so delightful and even canned, they come out multiple colors of orange, which dresses up the shelves. I also grew of mix of yellow wax and green beans this year. The two beans work well together canned. They have a nicer appearance than just yellow or just green beans in a can. However, because the two beans have slightly different tastes, you also get more flavorful meals out of the combination.

I still stand by the statement I made long ago when starting this blog, every year is both a good and a bad year. Because I planted a wide range of vegetables and ensured I didn’t plant all the vegetables in a single location in the garden, I ended up with more than enough vegetables to can or freeze. No, I didn’t get all of the vegetables that I had hoped to get, but I definitely won’t starve either. My larder is quite full at this point. Let me know your thoughts on ensuring a garden has a significant variety of items in it to ensure success at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.