Installing Python Packages (Part 1)

My Python-related books, Beginning Programming with Python For Dummies, Python for Data Science for Dummies, and Machine Learning for Dummies use various libraries to perform book-specific tasks. The books do provide instructions as needed, but, based on reader input, sometimes these instructions aren’t as clear as necessary, located in precisely the right location, or possibly as specific as needed. This post will help you get the packages containing the libraries you need installed in order to get more from the books.

It’s essential to remember that Beginning Programming with Python for Dummies relies on the 3.3.4 version of Python. The other two books rely on Python 2.7.x versions. The reason for using the older version of Python in these two books is that these books rely on libraries that Python 3.x doesn’t support. If you try to install these libraries on Python 3.x, you’ll get an error message of somewhat dubious usefulness.

In most cases, the easiest way to install a package is to open a command prompt with Administrator privileges and rely on the pip (for Python 2.x) or pip3 (for Python 3.x) command to perform the installation. For example, to install BeautifulSoup, you can type pip install beautifulsoup4 and press Enter. Installing any other package follows about the same route.

The only problem with the pip utility is that you don’t get it with every version of Python. When using an older version of Python, such as 3.3.4, you actually need to install the pip utility to use it. Fortunately, the installation instructions at https://pip.pypa.io/en/latest/installing/ aren’t difficult to use and you’ll be up and running in a few minutes.

Some readers have also complained that pip doesn’t provide much information when it comes to errors. The lack of information can prove problematic when an installation doesn’t go as planned. Next week I plan to cover the conda utility that comes with Anaconda. This utility isn’t as easy to use in some respects as pip, but it does provide considerably more information. If you have any questions about using the pip utility with my books, please contact me at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

Author: John

John Mueller is a freelance author and technical editor. He has writing in his blood, having produced 99 books and over 600 articles to date. The topics range from networking to artificial intelligence and from database management to heads-down programming. Some of his current books include a Web security book, discussions of how to manage big data using data science, a Windows command -line reference, and a book that shows how to build your own custom PC. His technical editing skills have helped over more than 67 authors refine the content of their manuscripts. John has provided technical editing services to both Data Based Advisor and Coast Compute magazines. He has also contributed articles to magazines such as Software Quality Connection, DevSource, InformIT, SQL Server Professional, Visual C++ Developer, Hard Core Visual Basic, asp.netPRO, Software Test and Performance, and Visual Basic Developer. Be sure to read John’s blog at http://blog.johnmuellerbooks.com/.

When John isn’t working at the computer, you can find him outside in the garden, cutting wood, or generally enjoying nature. John also likes making wine and knitting. When not occupied with anything else, he makes glycerin soap and candles, which comes in handy for gift baskets. You can reach John on the Internet at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. John is also setting up a website at http://www.johnmuellerbooks.com/. Feel free to take a look and make suggestions on how he can improve it.