Using Notes, Tips, and Warnings Effectively

Writing is all about emotion—I’ve mentioned this need quite a few times in the past. There are many ways to create emotion in technical writing. Of course, word choice, sentence structure, and other tools of the trade come into play, just as they do for every other form of writing. You can answer the six questions in a specific way or you can set material aside in a sidebar. However, one of the approaches that is truly different in technical writing is the use of notes, tips, and warnings. In all three cases, you create a single paragraph sidebar-like structure, but the emphasis and nuance of the inclusion is different from other sorts of writing:

  • Notes: Information that you want to include as an aside to the main text. You might choose to document the information source, the location of additional information, or augment parts of the main text in some way. The emotional impact of a note is the feeling of being special. When the reader sees a note, it should evoke a feeling that this is peculiar or extraordinary information that could impact the reader’s use of technology.
  • Tips: Information that is extra in nature. You might choose to include a personal technique that you haven’t seen documented anywhere else, the location of goodies that won’t necessarily affect the reader’s use of technology described in the book, but will add to the readers appreciation of that technology, or some sort of gift-like source, perhaps a free download. The emotional impact of a tip is one of surprise. When a reader sees a tip, it should evoke a sense of getting extra value from the book—something unexpected that adds value to the reading experience. A reader should get the tingly feeling that one gets when receiving an unexpected present.
  • Warnings: Information that is dire in nature. Reserve warnings for those times when a reader’s incorrect action could cause personal, data, or other sorts of damage. The emotional impact of the warning is dread. The reader should see a warning as a notification that incorrect actions are rewarded negatively—they’re the stick that goes with the carrot of notes and tips.

It’s important to remember that these three constructs aren’t the main event. Your body text is still the main event and these three elements serve only to emphasize that material in some way. Depending on the book you write, you may have other specialized paragraphs at your disposal. Each of these unique paragraph types should evoke a particular emotion. Unfortunately, the emotion they should evoke is seldom documented, so you need to figure it out for yourself. It’s essential that you do take the time to discover what emotion the paragraph is supposed to evoke (or simply not use the special paragraph in your writing).

Unlike sidebars, notes, tips, and warnings are rarely more than a paragraph long. You could possibly make an argument for two paragraphs in rare circumstances. The paragraph should contain two or three sentences with the first sentence providing a summary and the second providing details. A third sentence provides ancillary information as needed. The structure and content of your special paragraph should reflect the kind of paragraph you’re creating—as with a good actor, keep your paragraph in character. After all, it’s a performer on the stage of your book and presents the reader with a special feature that is unavailable elsewhere.

Using the special paragraphs at your disposal in the correct way can mean the difference between communicating effectively with your reader and losing the reader’s attention completely. Let me know your thoughts about the use of notes, tips, warnings, and other special paragraphs at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

Author: John

John Mueller is a freelance author and technical editor. He has writing in his blood, having produced 99 books and over 600 articles to date. The topics range from networking to artificial intelligence and from database management to heads-down programming. Some of his current books include a Web security book, discussions of how to manage big data using data science, a Windows command -line reference, and a book that shows how to build your own custom PC. His technical editing skills have helped over more than 67 authors refine the content of their manuscripts. John has provided technical editing services to both Data Based Advisor and Coast Compute magazines. He has also contributed articles to magazines such as Software Quality Connection, DevSource, InformIT, SQL Server Professional, Visual C++ Developer, Hard Core Visual Basic, asp.netPRO, Software Test and Performance, and Visual Basic Developer. Be sure to read John’s blog at http://blog.johnmuellerbooks.com/.

When John isn’t working at the computer, you can find him outside in the garden, cutting wood, or generally enjoying nature. John also likes making wine and knitting. When not occupied with anything else, he makes glycerin soap and candles, which comes in handy for gift baskets. You can reach John on the Internet at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. John is also setting up a website at http://www.johnmuellerbooks.com/. Feel free to take a look and make suggestions on how he can improve it.