Getting Your Favorite Application on the Web

The world where users sit in front of a desktop system all day managing data is going away. Users won’t settle for just sitting in front of a computer any longer—they want to compute using their smartphone, tablet, and any other device that comes to mind. A time is coming when a user who has an idea in the middle of the night will talk to the alarm clock, which will make the required changes while the user goes back to sleep. For today, however, users appear content to make their changes using the interesting array of technologies that are already available. Who knows, perhaps someone out there is actually using their Apple Watch to make changes to a report they need to give in a few hours.

The point of writing HTML5 Programming with JavaScript for Dummies, CSS3 for Dummies, and Security for Web Developers is to make these technologies available desktop developers who have become a bit nervous about the future of their favorite language. It’s unlikely that any developer has failed to observe the movement from the desktop to everywhere else. Fortunately, many languages you use today will compile to JavaScript. All you really need is the right tool to make the move. In fact, a recent ComputerWorld article discusses six of these tools in enough detail for you to at least gain an appreciation of what they can do for you. Therefore, it’s possible for you to move some of your favorite applications to the new reality of computing. The applications may run a bit more slowly, but they should work well.

Of course, some developers are in denial. They point out the reams of code already in existence and how organizations around the world will refuse the give them up. The organization may very well refuse to give the desktop application code up, but the user has already done so. Applications require willing users. In the absence of willing users, no mandate will force anyone to use a broken application. Users will find a way around the mandate and it’s likely that no amount of coercion will force users to comply with the dreams of developers who have stuck by the desktop system.

We’re talking average users here. Any user who uses applications for mundane tasks that long ago became the essence of modern business. Developers will still find people who actually do need the power of desktop applications. it’s entirely possible that both engineers and scientists will continue to use desktop applications far into the future, but these applications are at the periphery. The days of the desktop are gone—it’s time to get used to the idea that your next application will probably be web-based and that you’ll use a language appropriate for that venue to create it. In the meantime, you do have options for moving your existing code. Let me know your thoughts about applications that run anywhere on any device at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.