Programming Your Way

I’ve been working with Python for a while now. In fact, I’ve worked on three books on the topic: Beginning Programming with Python For Dummies, Professional IronPython, and Python for Data Science for Dummies. Of the languages I’ve used, Python actually comes the closest to meeting most of the programming needs I have (and a lot of other developers agree). It’s not a perfect language—no language can quite fulfill that role because of all the complexities of creating applications and the needs developers have. However, if any language comes close, it’s Python.

There are a number of reasons why I believe Python is a great language, but the issue I’d like to discuss today is the fact that you can actually use four completely different programming styles with Python. Care to guess what they are? In order to find out for sure, you’ll need to read Embracing the Four Python Programming Styles. Before I encountered Python, I never dreamed that a language could be quite so flexible. In fact, the single word description of Python is flexible.

Realistically, every language has potential issues and Python has them as well. For example, Python can run a bit slow, so I probably wouldn’t choose it to perform low level tasks on a specific system. It also lacks the User Interface (UI) functionality offered by other languages. Yes, there are a huge number of add-on libraries you can use, but nothing quite matches the drag and drop functionality provided by languages such as C#.

However, negative points aside, there aren’t any other languages that I know of that allow you so much flexibility in programming your way. You have four different styles to choose from. In fact, you can mix and match styles as needed within a single application. The ability to mix and match styles means that you can program in the way that feels most comfortable to you and that’s a huge advantage. Let me know what you think about Python’s ability to work with different programming styles at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

Author: John

John Mueller is a freelance author and technical editor. He has writing in his blood, having produced 99 books and over 600 articles to date. The topics range from networking to artificial intelligence and from database management to heads-down programming. Some of his current books include a Web security book, discussions of how to manage big data using data science, a Windows command -line reference, and a book that shows how to build your own custom PC. His technical editing skills have helped over more than 67 authors refine the content of their manuscripts. John has provided technical editing services to both Data Based Advisor and Coast Compute magazines. He has also contributed articles to magazines such as Software Quality Connection, DevSource, InformIT, SQL Server Professional, Visual C++ Developer, Hard Core Visual Basic, asp.netPRO, Software Test and Performance, and Visual Basic Developer. Be sure to read John’s blog at http://blog.johnmuellerbooks.com/.

When John isn’t working at the computer, you can find him outside in the garden, cutting wood, or generally enjoying nature. John also likes making wine and knitting. When not occupied with anything else, he makes glycerin soap and candles, which comes in handy for gift baskets. You can reach John on the Internet at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. John is also setting up a website at http://www.johnmuellerbooks.com/. Feel free to take a look and make suggestions on how he can improve it.