Using My Coding Books Effectively

A lot of people ask me how to use my books to learn a coding technique quickly.  I recently wrote two articles for New Relic that help explain the techniques for choosing a technical book and the best way to get precisely the book you want. These articles are important to you, the reader, because I want to be sure that you’ll always like the books you purchase, no matter who wrote them. More importantly, these articles help you get a good start with my coding books because you start with a book that contains something you really do need.

Of course, there is more to the process than simply getting the right book. When you already have some experience with the language and techniques for using it, you can simply look up the appropriate example in the book and use it as a learning aid. However, the vast majority of the people asking this question have absolutely no experience with the language or the techniques for using it. Some people have never written an application or worked with code at all. In this case, there really aren’t any shortcuts. Learning something really does mean spending the time to take the small steps required to obtain the skills required. Someday, there may be a technology that will simply pour the knowledge into your head, but that technology doesn’t exist today.

Even reading a book cover-to-cover won’t help you succeed. My own personal experiences tell me that I need to use multiple strategies to ensure I actually understand a new programming technique and I’ve been doing this for a long time (well over 30 years). Just reading my books won’t make you a coder, you must work harder than that. Here is a quick overview of some techniques that I use when I need to discover a new way of working with code or to learn an entirely new technology (the articles will provide you with more detail):

  • Read the text carefully.
  • Work through the examples in the book.
  • Download the code examples and run them in the IDE.
  • Write the code examples by hand and execute them.
  • Work through the examples line-by-line using the debugger (see Debugging as An Educational Tool).
  • Talk to the author of the book about specific examples.
  • Modify the examples to obtain different effects or to expand them in specific ways.
  • Use the coding technique in an existing application.
  • Talk to other developers about the coding technique.
  • Research different versions of the coding technique online.
  • View a video of someone using the technique to perform specific tasks.

There are other methods you can use to work with my books, but this list represents the most common techniques I use. Yes, it’s a relatively long list and they all require some amount of effort on my part to perform. It isn’t possible to learn a new technique without putting in the time required to learn it. In a day of instant gratification, knowledge still requires time to obtain. The wisdom to use the knowledge appropriately, takes even longer. I truly wish there were an easier way to help you get the knowledge needed, but there simply isn’t.

Of course, I’m always here to help you with my books. When you have a book-specific question, I want to hear about it because I want you to have the best possible experience using my books. In addition, unless you tell me that something isn’t working for you, I’ll never know and I won’t be able to discuss solutions for the issue as part of blog post or e-mail resolution.

What methods do you use to make the knowledge you obtain from books work better? The question of how people learn takes up a considerable part of my time, so this is an important question for my future books and making them better. Let me know your thoughts about the question at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. The same e-mail address also works for your book-specific questions.

 

Author: John

John Mueller is a freelance author and technical editor. He has writing in his blood, having produced 99 books and over 600 articles to date. The topics range from networking to artificial intelligence and from database management to heads-down programming. Some of his current books include a Web security book, discussions of how to manage big data using data science, a Windows command -line reference, and a book that shows how to build your own custom PC. His technical editing skills have helped over more than 67 authors refine the content of their manuscripts. John has provided technical editing services to both Data Based Advisor and Coast Compute magazines. He has also contributed articles to magazines such as Software Quality Connection, DevSource, InformIT, SQL Server Professional, Visual C++ Developer, Hard Core Visual Basic, asp.netPRO, Software Test and Performance, and Visual Basic Developer. Be sure to read John’s blog at http://blog.johnmuellerbooks.com/.

When John isn’t working at the computer, you can find him outside in the garden, cutting wood, or generally enjoying nature. John also likes making wine and knitting. When not occupied with anything else, he makes glycerin soap and candles, which comes in handy for gift baskets. You can reach John on the Internet at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. John is also setting up a website at http://www.johnmuellerbooks.com/. Feel free to take a look and make suggestions on how he can improve it.