Understanding the Continuing Need for C++

I maintain statistics on all my books, including C++ All-In-One for Dummies, 3rd Edition. These statistics are based on reader e-mail and other sources of input that I get. I even take the comments on Amazon.com into account. One of the most common C++ questions I get (not the most common, but it’s up there) is why someone would want to use the language in the first place. It’s true, C++ isn’t the language to use if you’re creating a database application. However, it is the language to use if you’re writing low-level code that has to run fast. C++ also sees use in a vast number of libraries because library code has to be fast. For example, check out the Python libraries at some point and you’ll find C++ staring back at you. In fact, part of the Python documentation discusses how to use C++ to create extensions.

I decided to look through some of my past notes to see if there was some succinct discussion of just why C++ is a useful language for the average developer to know. That’s when I ran across an InfoWorld article entitled, “Stroustrup: Why the 35-year-old C++ still dominates ‘real’ dev.” Given that the guy being interviewed is Bjarne Stroustrup, the inventor of C++, it’s a great source of information. The interview is revealing because it’s obvious that Bjarne is taking a measured view of C++ and not simply telling everyone to use it for every occasion (quite the contrary, in fact).

The bottom line in C++ development is speed. Along with speed, you also get flexibility and great access to the hardware. As with anything, you pay a price for getting these features. In the case of C++, you’ll experience increased development time, greater complexity, and more difficulty in locating bugs. Some people are taking a new route to C++ speed though and that’s to write their code in one language and move it to C++ from there. For example, some Python developers are now cross-compiling their code into C++ to gain a speed advantage. You can read about it in the InfoWorld article entitled, “Python-to-C++ compiler promises speedier execution.”

A lot of readers will close a message to me asking whether there is a single language they can learn to do everything well. Unfortunately, there isn’t any such language and given the nature of computer languages, I doubt there ever will be. Every language has a niche for which it’s indispensable. The smart developer has a toolbox full of languages suited for every job the developer intends to tackle.

Do you find that you really don’t understand how the languages in my books can help you? Let me know your book-specific language questions at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. It’s always my goal that you understand how the material you’ve learned while reading one of my books will eventually help you in the long run. After all, what’s the point of reading a book that doesn’t help you in some material way? Thanks, as always, for your staunch support of my writing efforts!