Update on Guardline Wireless Driveway Alarm

A number of months ago I posted Review of Guardline Wireless Driveway Alarm. Since that time, I’ve had a number of reader queries for additional information. Many people want to know what sort of environment I’m using the Guardline Wireless Driveway Alarm in. I live in a rural setting in a cold weather climate. Yes, I do have to deal with some amount of traffic, but nothing like a busy street in the city. However, my road does see a fair number of trucks, along with tractors and even Amish buggies. As far as I know, none of the animals in this area seem to be attracted to the sensor and there isn’t any evidence of attack on them.

I can’t really tell you how long the batteries last in the sensors yet. I’m still waiting for the first set of batteries to fail. So, the batteries will last at least seven months. If the batteries are still good in July, I plan to replace them anyway, just to keep trouble at bay. Replacing the batteries in summer seems like it would be easier than in the frigid winter. Let’s just say that the batteries last a long time if you use good batteries. I used Duracell batteries in my setup—your battery life will likely differ from mine.

About the only maintenance issue I’ve had so far is that the sensor near the road requires adjustment from time-to-time. I’m not sure whether the wind, the traffic, or some combination of both is to blame, but the sensor does require occasional adjustment. So far, I’ve needed to adjust the sensor twice, so it’s not all that often. The sensor mounted near my house hasn’t ever required adjustment. If you start noticing a number of false alarms, the problem could rest solely with a needed sensor adjustment.

I do get an occasional false alarm. Sometimes birds will fly just right and trip the sensor. A deer once stood at the right spot to trip the sensor. The snow plow has tripped the sensor once or twice. I’m still seeing just one or two false alarms per week. Some weeks go by and I don’t receive any false alarms at all. It all seems dependent on just what’s in the area and the weather conditions at the time. Higher winds seem to make it more likely that I’ll get a false alarm.

This product still seems to work better than any unit I tried in the past. Even with the degradation that will occur over time, I imagine I’ll get a long lifespan from it and plan to buy additional sensors at some point. I still stand by the statements that I mad in my earlier product review. Thank you so much for the input you’ve provided to date!

 

Author: John

John Mueller is a freelance author and technical editor. He has writing in his blood, having produced 99 books and over 600 articles to date. The topics range from networking to artificial intelligence and from database management to heads-down programming. Some of his current books include a Web security book, discussions of how to manage big data using data science, a Windows command -line reference, and a book that shows how to build your own custom PC. His technical editing skills have helped over more than 67 authors refine the content of their manuscripts. John has provided technical editing services to both Data Based Advisor and Coast Compute magazines. He has also contributed articles to magazines such as Software Quality Connection, DevSource, InformIT, SQL Server Professional, Visual C++ Developer, Hard Core Visual Basic, asp.netPRO, Software Test and Performance, and Visual Basic Developer. Be sure to read John’s blog at http://blog.johnmuellerbooks.com/.

When John isn’t working at the computer, you can find him outside in the garden, cutting wood, or generally enjoying nature. John also likes making wine and knitting. When not occupied with anything else, he makes glycerin soap and candles, which comes in handy for gift baskets. You can reach John on the Internet at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. John is also setting up a website at http://www.johnmuellerbooks.com/. Feel free to take a look and make suggestions on how he can improve it.