Where is Python 3?

A number of readers have been sending me e-mail about Beginning Programming with Python For Dummies and why I chose to use Python 3.3 instead of one of the Python 2.x versions. In general, I believe in using the most up-to-date version of a language product available because that’s the future of programming for that language. So, it wasn’t too surprising to me that I noted in a recent InfoWorld article that Fedora 22 will have Python 3 installed by default. I’ve started noticing that Python 3 will be the default with other products and in other environments too. Choosing Python 3.3 for this particular book looks like a really good choice because anyone reading it will be equipped to work with the latest version as it becomes adopted in a wider range of environments.

I do talk about standard Python in Professional IronPython. Of course, this book is targeted toward IronPython users, not Python users, but talking about standard Python and how you can use both libraries and utilities from it seemed like a good idea when I wrote the book. You need to remember that a solid version of Python 3 wasn’t available at the time I wrote this book and that Python 2 was really popular at the time. If there are readers of this book who would like me to create a series of posts that discuss using Python 3 libraries and tools with IronPython (assuming it’s possible), you need to let me know at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. I try to accommodate reader needs whenever I can, as long as there is an interest in my doing so. At this point, I haven’t had a single reader request for such support, which is why I’m making a direct request for your input.

This leaves my current book project, Python for Data Science for Dummies. It turns out that the Data Science community is heavily involved with Python 2. My coauthor, Luca, and I have discussed the issue in depth and have decided to use Python 2 for this particular book. The limitation is that the libraries used for Data Science haven’t been moved to Python 3 completely and the entire Data Science community still uses Python 2 exclusively. If it later turns out that things change, I can certainly post some updates for the book here so that it remains as current as possible.

Python is an exception to the rule when it comes to languages. There are currently two viable versions of the language, so I can understand that some readers are completely confused. I encourage you to contact me with your thoughts, ideas, and concerns regarding the use of specific Python versions in my books. I want you to feel comfortable with the decisions that I made in putting the books together. More importantly, your input helps me decide on content for future books, articles, and blog posts. Unless I know what you need, it’s really hard to write good content, so please keep those e-mails coming!


Author: John

John Mueller is a freelance author and technical editor. He has writing in his blood, having produced 99 books and over 600 articles to date. The topics range from networking to artificial intelligence and from database management to heads-down programming. Some of his current books include a Web security book, discussions of how to manage big data using data science, a Windows command -line reference, and a book that shows how to build your own custom PC. His technical editing skills have helped over more than 67 authors refine the content of their manuscripts. John has provided technical editing services to both Data Based Advisor and Coast Compute magazines. He has also contributed articles to magazines such as Software Quality Connection, DevSource, InformIT, SQL Server Professional, Visual C++ Developer, Hard Core Visual Basic, asp.netPRO, Software Test and Performance, and Visual Basic Developer. Be sure to read John’s blog at http://blog.johnmuellerbooks.com/. When John isn’t working at the computer, you can find him outside in the garden, cutting wood, or generally enjoying nature. John also likes making wine and knitting. When not occupied with anything else, he makes glycerin soap and candles, which comes in handy for gift baskets. You can reach John on the Internet at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. John is also setting up a website at http://www.johnmuellerbooks.com/. Feel free to take a look and make suggestions on how he can improve it.