Scoring Your JavaScript Library

Choosing a library for your Web application can be difficult. Both HTML5 Programming with JavaScript for Dummies and CSS3 for Dummies emphasize the need to choose libraries with care. There are all sorts of considerations, such as whether the library enjoys popular support and has a good upgrade policy. You also need to know whether the library is secure and performs all the tasks you require of it in the manner you want them performed. These books do a great job of helping you understand the requirements for choosing a library.

At the time I wrote these books, jQuery was the most popular library available. In fact, both books emphasize use of jQuery for programming needs. It turns out that jQuery is still the most popular library around and for good reason, the producers of jQuery have done just about everything right, so developers continue to support them. If you need general interface and low level programming support, jQuery and jQuery UI are good places to start. What it really comes down to is reducing costs and getting work done faster. Money drives everything on the Internet, including your next project.

Two libraries simply can’t meet every need. Developers often use a wide variety of libraries to get the job done. Choosing the right library can be difficult. There are literally hundreds of them, all purporting to do the job faster, better, and for less money (when money is directly involved in the equation). Choosing the wrong library can incur huge penalties. That’s why a site such as Libscore is so important. You can use Libscore to find the top:

  • JavaScript Library
  • Script
  • Site Using JavaScript

The last option is the most important because it tells you what the top sites are and which libraries they use to achieve their goals. By viewing the site and seeing how it uses a library, you can make intelligent decisions for your own site. Exploring Libscore doesn’t take long, but can net you huge gains in productivity that translate into reduced costs and fewer errors.

I receive more than a few e-mails each week about JavaScript, HTML5, and CSS3. Readers really do want to know my opinion about this library or that. Unfortunately, my ability to test every library out there is limited. In fact, let’s be practical—even if I were to attempt to perform the task full time, I still wouldn’t have time as an individual to test all the options. So, using a site such as Libscore is the best option that I can offer you. I’d love to hear your opinions about Libscore or any other site offering the same functionality at If you send me information about another library scoring site, please make sure it actually works with JavaScript or another viable Web technology.


Author: John

John Mueller is a freelance author and technical editor. He has writing in his blood, having produced 99 books and over 600 articles to date. The topics range from networking to artificial intelligence and from database management to heads-down programming. Some of his current books include a Web security book, discussions of how to manage big data using data science, a Windows command -line reference, and a book that shows how to build your own custom PC. His technical editing skills have helped over more than 67 authors refine the content of their manuscripts. John has provided technical editing services to both Data Based Advisor and Coast Compute magazines. He has also contributed articles to magazines such as Software Quality Connection, DevSource, InformIT, SQL Server Professional, Visual C++ Developer, Hard Core Visual Basic, asp.netPRO, Software Test and Performance, and Visual Basic Developer. Be sure to read John’s blog at When John isn’t working at the computer, you can find him outside in the garden, cutting wood, or generally enjoying nature. John also likes making wine and knitting. When not occupied with anything else, he makes glycerin soap and candles, which comes in handy for gift baskets. You can reach John on the Internet at John is also setting up a website at Feel free to take a look and make suggestions on how he can improve it.