The Importance of Finding Work

Readers sometimes show patterns in the questions they ask and, in some cases, the pattern shows across a number of my books. When I started to note that readers were interested in discovering just how to earn a living once they have developed a new skill and that they were interested in me providing that information, I started adding a new section to many of my books, such as MATLAB for Dummies, that describes what sort of industries could use the skills the reader has learned. However, I don’t want anyone to be bored to tears either, so I made a point of listing interesting vocations. It’s my feeling that readers want to be engaged in their work. Of course, jobs with less pizzazz are always available and you might have to accept one of them—at least in the short term.

I didn’t provide such a listing for Java eLearning Kit for Dummies. My thought was that Java jobs are so plentiful that readers could probably find a job they liked without too much trouble. However, even with this book, I’ve received more than a few queries about the issue. That’s why I wrote 10 Surprisingly Interesting Ways to Earn a Living Using Java recently for New Relic. As with all my other job listings, this article focuses on jobs that could be really interesting and most definitely rewarding. Of course, not every job is for every person out there—you need to read the article to find the kind of job you like best.

One reader actually did ask why I focused my efforts on interesting (or at least, unusual) jobs. It all comes down to my personal vision of work. I get up every morning with all kinds of cool ideas to try for my books. I actually like opening my office door, starting up my systems, and getting down to writing. For me, work is an enjoyable experience—so much so, that I often forget that it’s work. I’d like other people to have that experience—to have the joy of enjoying their work so much that they really hate to leave at the end of the day.

Of course, there are other languages out there and I have other books that lack lists of jobs. If you find that one of my books is lacking this sort of information, and you really would like me to research the kinds of jobs that are available, let me know at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. I’d like to hear which book should receive a listing of associated jobs next. In the meantime, be sure to enjoy the Java job listing. You might see your dream job listed, you know, the one you didn’t think existed.