Review of C# 5.0 Programmer’s Reference

A number of readers have asked me about the next book to get after reading one of my C# books, such as Start Here! Learn Microsoft Visual C# 2010 or C# Design and Development. Of course, it’s hard to recommend a next book unless you know where the reader is headed. After all, many of my books offer a starting point or deal with a specific area of interest. Based on the feedback I’ve received, in most cases, what the reader really wants is a compendium such as C# 5.0 Programmer’s Reference by Rod Stephens. This 918 page book is truly huge and contains a great deal of information within the pages between the covers.

The beginning of the book offers a different (and updated) perspective of what my books offer. It’s a starting point for your adventure in programming. Rod and I have complimentary writing styles, so if you didn’t quite pick up a concept in my book, Rod’s explanation will almost certainly make the difference for you. Most importantly, Rod’s book offers that latest updates for C# developers that my books can’t offer because they’ve been out for a while.

By the time you get to Part IV of the book, you’re moving away from the material that I offer into some more advanced programming topics. For example, I don’t really talk much about printing in my books. All of these topics are treated in greater depth than the material in my books—generally because I’m covering the topic at a level and in a manner that the less experienced developer will understand. So it’s essential not to skip these topics even if you’ve read about them before.

Part V is where this book really excels. I was especially taken with the chapter on parallel programming. Just about every machine on the planet provides multiple processors today, yet applications don’t use them nearly as often as they should, which results in wasted processing cycles and poor performance. Rod also provides an outstanding discussion of cryptography. If you’ve read the trade press recently, you know that securing data is becoming harder and harder, yet more important all the time.

Every chapter ends with a set of exercises. This makes the book invaluable in the classroom. An instructor can assign the book a bit at a time and have exercises ready to check the student’s comprehension of the material. Appendix A contains the answers for the exercises, so the answers are easy to check. It could be possible to create a student version of the book that lacks Appendix A so the instructor can check the student’s answers without worry about peeking.

What makes this book a compendium, a reference book, is the appendices in the back of the book. There is an appendix for nearly everything you can imagine. Do you need a quick refresher on data types? Well, you can find it in Appendix B. Appendix J will give you the quick scoop about Language INtegrated Query (LINQ). Look in Appendix T when you need to know more about regular expressions. The point is that the appendices make it easy to perform quick lookups when you’re in a hurry.

The bottom line is that if you need a book that will do more than just sit on your shelf, this is the one to get. You could easily use this book to get a great refresher on C# usage, an update on the new features provided by C# 5.0, a great classroom experience, and that reference book that you need later when you need to rediscover something under pressure.

 

Author: John

John Mueller is a freelance author and technical editor. He has writing in his blood, having produced 99 books and over 600 articles to date. The topics range from networking to artificial intelligence and from database management to heads-down programming. Some of his current books include a Web security book, discussions of how to manage big data using data science, a Windows command -line reference, and a book that shows how to build your own custom PC. His technical editing skills have helped over more than 67 authors refine the content of their manuscripts. John has provided technical editing services to both Data Based Advisor and Coast Compute magazines. He has also contributed articles to magazines such as Software Quality Connection, DevSource, InformIT, SQL Server Professional, Visual C++ Developer, Hard Core Visual Basic, asp.netPRO, Software Test and Performance, and Visual Basic Developer. Be sure to read John’s blog at http://blog.johnmuellerbooks.com/. When John isn’t working at the computer, you can find him outside in the garden, cutting wood, or generally enjoying nature. John also likes making wine and knitting. When not occupied with anything else, he makes glycerin soap and candles, which comes in handy for gift baskets. You can reach John on the Internet at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. John is also setting up a website at http://www.johnmuellerbooks.com/. Feel free to take a look and make suggestions on how he can improve it.