Cross Platform Functionality for .NET

Microsoft has recently announced that it will port the .NET Framework to the Mac and Linux platforms. This is welcome news because more and more of my readers have expressed an interest in developing applications that run on multiple platforms. It’s the reason that I cover Windows, Linux, and Mac requirements in books such as Beginning Programming with Python For Dummies. Until now, I usually had to include some mention of alternative solutions, such Mono, to help my readers achieve cross-platform functionality. (For readers with older versions of my books, Mono is actually delivered by Xamarin now, see my announcement in the An Update About Mono post.) Even though Mono makes a valiant effort to make cross-platform a reality, it does have limits, so the Microsoft announcement is welcome. Now we have to see whether Microsoft actually delivers on its promises.

There has been a lot of analysis about the announcement. You can find some general information about the product on eWeek. The information is pretty much a reworded version of the Microsoft announcement, but I found it clear and succinct. The InfoWorld writeup provides additional information and takes Microsoft to task for not completely opening the .NET Framework. There are still some licensing issues to consider. For my part, I wonder when Microsoft will make it possible to fully use C# on any platform. At some point, Microsoft must make it possible to develop applications on a platform other than Windows or developers will continue to lose interest.

One of the biggest questions I’ll need to answer for you is whether any of my book examples will run on other platforms. Given how Microsoft has done things in the past, it seems unlikely that you’ll be able to use any of my existing book examples on other platforms. The code might possibly work, but the downloadable source would have to be redone to make it possible to compile the examples with the new tools. So, for now, I’m saying outright that you need to continue to use my books with the version of Visual Studio for which they are written and not assume that the examples will work on other platforms.

I do find the news exciting because there is finally a chance that I’ll be able to address your needs better when it comes to working with languages such as C#. Yes, working with solutions such as Mono did allow you to perform certain tasks across platforms, but there is not a potential for writing complete applications of nearly any type and having them work anywhere, which is where the world as a whole has been headed for a long time. I applaud Microsoft’s efforts to move forward.

Please do contact me with your questions regarding cross-platform functionality in .NET and how it affects by books at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. No, I can’t answer your question about how Microsoft will implement cross-platform functionality in the new versions of .NET, but yes, I do want to hear about your ideas for book updates based on this technology. What I want to do is help you use this new functionality as soon as is possible.

 

Author: John

John Mueller is a freelance author and technical editor. He has writing in his blood, having produced 99 books and over 600 articles to date. The topics range from networking to artificial intelligence and from database management to heads-down programming. Some of his current books include a Web security book, discussions of how to manage big data using data science, a Windows command -line reference, and a book that shows how to build your own custom PC. His technical editing skills have helped over more than 67 authors refine the content of their manuscripts. John has provided technical editing services to both Data Based Advisor and Coast Compute magazines. He has also contributed articles to magazines such as Software Quality Connection, DevSource, InformIT, SQL Server Professional, Visual C++ Developer, Hard Core Visual Basic, asp.netPRO, Software Test and Performance, and Visual Basic Developer. Be sure to read John’s blog at http://blog.johnmuellerbooks.com/.

When John isn’t working at the computer, you can find him outside in the garden, cutting wood, or generally enjoying nature. John also likes making wine and knitting. When not occupied with anything else, he makes glycerin soap and candles, which comes in handy for gift baskets. You can reach John on the Internet at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. John is also setting up a website at http://www.johnmuellerbooks.com/. Feel free to take a look and make suggestions on how he can improve it.