Python Community Support

There are many issues to consider when choosing a programming language. Python is no exception. Just because I feel it’s the right tool to meet some of my needs doesn’t mean it will work well for you. That’s why the Understanding Why Python is So Cool section of Chapter 1 in Beginning Programming with Python For Dummies is so important. This section tells you why I see Python as an important programming language and why you might want to use it too. I break the problem into three parts: what Python can do for your application needs, how Python can benefit you personally, and which organizations are using Python for specific tasks. (Another blog post, Python as a Learning Tool, augments the Chapter 1 information.) Between the three sections, you can make an intelligent decision as to whether Python will actually serve your particular needs. I really don’t want you to take my word for it—I would rather know that you selected Python based on your own research.

No matter how interesting a language is, no matter how many features it provides, and no matter how much you personally like it—you can’t typically support a language that lacks broad community support. If no one else is using the language and contributing to it in some major way, the language will eventually die. Fortunately, Python doesn’t have this problem. Chapter 20 of my book discusses ten essential libraries for Python, none of which come with the language when you download it. In fact, the introduction to this chapter lists a number of places where you can find even more libraries to use.

The thing is that Python keeps attracting ever more attention. A recent InfoWorld article, “Hidden gems: 10 Python tools too good to overlook“, provides you with access to still more libraries. The point about libraries is that they represent an essential form of community support. As people use a language, they start to build places where others can discuss it with them. However, that’s only one form of community support. Libraries represent a significant increase in support because creating, debugging, and supporting a library requires time and effort that most developers don’t have in abundance. Someone really has to believe in a language to provide this sort of language support.

The fact is that Python is poised to become the next “must learn” language. It has great community support, provides a broad range of functionality through libraries, and is fully supported by the academic community. Even though other languages have had these advantages and eventually failed, the chances are far less likely that Python will experience problems. In fact, many rankings sites show Python as being the 4th to 8th most popular language out there right now.

Community support is an essential determinant of programming language popularity. How do you rank Python in your toolbox and why? Let me know at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. Tell me about your favorite Python library and how you use it as well. I’m interested in discovering just what makes some languages so incredibly popular (Python being one of the most popular).

 

Author: John

John Mueller is a freelance author and technical editor. He has writing in his blood, having produced 99 books and over 600 articles to date. The topics range from networking to artificial intelligence and from database management to heads-down programming. Some of his current books include a Web security book, discussions of how to manage big data using data science, a Windows command -line reference, and a book that shows how to build your own custom PC. His technical editing skills have helped over more than 67 authors refine the content of their manuscripts. John has provided technical editing services to both Data Based Advisor and Coast Compute magazines. He has also contributed articles to magazines such as Software Quality Connection, DevSource, InformIT, SQL Server Professional, Visual C++ Developer, Hard Core Visual Basic, asp.netPRO, Software Test and Performance, and Visual Basic Developer. Be sure to read John’s blog at http://blog.johnmuellerbooks.com/.

When John isn’t working at the computer, you can find him outside in the garden, cutting wood, or generally enjoying nature. John also likes making wine and knitting. When not occupied with anything else, he makes glycerin soap and candles, which comes in handy for gift baskets. You can reach John on the Internet at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. John is also setting up a website at http://www.johnmuellerbooks.com/. Feel free to take a look and make suggestions on how he can improve it.