Choosing a C++ Editor

A lot of people have asked why I chose Code::Blocks as the editor for C++ All-In-One for Dummies, 3rd Edition. There are a number of reason that I chose this particular editor including:

  • Ease of use
  • Free download
  • Runs on all the platforms the book supports

However, the fact that Code::Blocks works well for the book and for most beginning projects doesn’t mean it’s the best solution for your particular needs. There are many different C++ Integrated Development Environments (IDEs) out there and I’m constantly trying new products. When the new version of Visual Studio comes out, you can be sure I’ll obtain a copy and check it out because some of my readers use Visual Studio. The problem with Visual Studio is that it tends to use Microsoft additions to the C++ language and it also doesn’t run on all the platforms that the book must support. However, if you’re working with Microsoft systems and need to create a relatively large project, Visual Studio might be a good choice for you—only you can make that determination.

The Eclipse IDE is another good selection. In fact, I used Eclipse when writing Java eLearning Kit for Dummies because it runs on every platform I needed to test. When I wrote this book, I chose to focus on the language though and not really mention the IDE at all. I didn’t want readers to have preconceived ideas of how Java should look inside an editor. I had thought about using Eclipse for C++ All-in-One for Dummies, 3rd Edition, but after reviewing the IDE and comparing it to Code::Blocks, I felt Code::Blocks was a lot simpler. Even so, if you need great multiplatform support for your C++ projects, Eclipse is a great choice.

I recently tried another IDE, Intel Composer. This is most definitely not a IDE for the faint of heart or the light of pocketbook (the asking price is $1,199.00). Of course, many of you are going to question my sanity for even downloading such a product when there are so many less expensive solutions out there. The main reason to obtain a product like this one is that it provides phenomenal parallelism support for multiprocessor applications. In other words, you use this sort of IDE for high end projects. You can read all the other features this product offers on the vendor site. One of the other items that grabbed my attention is that it provides both multiplatform (Windows, Mac, Linux, and Android) and multiformat (Phone, Tablet, PC, Ultrabook, and Server) support. Whether this particular IDE makes sense for your needs depends on the kind of applications you create.

Although the information in Wikipedia is often suspect, you can find a comparison of various IDEs at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_integrated_development_environments. The best way to choose a C++ IDE is to look for a product that meets your needs and then try it out on a subset of the problem you’re trying to solve. Researching the IDE you use is essential because a mistake can cost you a lot of time later. Not every IDE support every C++ feature, every platform, or every team need. Tell me why you think I should move to something other than Code::Blocks for the next edition of the book at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

Author: John

John Mueller is a freelance author and technical editor. He has writing in his blood, having produced 99 books and over 600 articles to date. The topics range from networking to artificial intelligence and from database management to heads-down programming. Some of his current books include a Web security book, discussions of how to manage big data using data science, a Windows command -line reference, and a book that shows how to build your own custom PC. His technical editing skills have helped over more than 67 authors refine the content of their manuscripts. John has provided technical editing services to both Data Based Advisor and Coast Compute magazines. He has also contributed articles to magazines such as Software Quality Connection, DevSource, InformIT, SQL Server Professional, Visual C++ Developer, Hard Core Visual Basic, asp.netPRO, Software Test and Performance, and Visual Basic Developer. Be sure to read John’s blog at http://blog.johnmuellerbooks.com/. When John isn’t working at the computer, you can find him outside in the garden, cutting wood, or generally enjoying nature. John also likes making wine and knitting. When not occupied with anything else, he makes glycerin soap and candles, which comes in handy for gift baskets. You can reach John on the Internet at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. John is also setting up a website at http://www.johnmuellerbooks.com/. Feel free to take a look and make suggestions on how he can improve it.