Review of Guardline Wireless Driveway Alarm

One of the more interesting things about working out of your home is that you get a number of business visitors. I don’t receive visitors every day, so there is no need for a receptionist or anything that fancy. However, given that I don’t know these people most of the time and it would be a good idea to know they’re on my property, ensuring I know they’re coming up the driveway is a good idea. So, I decided to get a wireless driveway alarm. After looking at quite a few of them in detail and trying out one other model that simply didn’t live up to the vendor claims, I purchased the Guardline Wireless Driveway Alarm.

This particular product is a little more expensive than a few others on the market, but not unreasonably so. It has a number of features that makes it a better choice than the competition. For one thing, it has a longer wireless range than the others I looked at, about 1,000 feet. The signal from the remote sensors is quite strong in my house, so I can move the receiver just about anywhere and expect notification of someone coming up the driveway.

I was also able to obtain sensors as a separate purchase. The system supports four different zones. Each zone has a separate sensor. The receiver displays a different light for each zone and you can also configure each zone to have a different sound. So, you don’t actually have to look at the receiver to know when someone is coming up the drive (or moving around on your property in general).

What intrigues me is that you can also purchase separate receivers. If you have a multilevel house like I do, having multiple receivers saves you from having to carry the receiver from location-to-location. I may eventually have one receiver for each floor of the house.

So far, I haven’t experienced a single false alarm. This fact actually surprises me quite a lot because I live in the country. I had expected that the chickens might escape notice, but so far none of the deer in the area has managed to trigger the sensor either. On the other hand, the sensors have faithfully noted absolutely every visitor I’ve had so far. I can actually see where someone is at on my property based on the zone that is triggered at any given time.

Take my advice and use the quick setup to start with. The book makes everything sound way too complicated. The system comes with a quick setup sheet that makes setup a breeze. All you really need to do is put batteries into each unit, assign each sensor to a specific zone, and then give each zone a unique sound.

The sensors require battery power, which makes sense given that this is a wireless setup. The receiver does include a battery backup, but it normally runs on AC power. A nice feature is that the receiver also provides a battery test for the remote sensors. Simply run the test and you know whether a sensor has batteries that require replacement. A sensor will also light an LED on the receiver when its battery power is low.

Installing the hardware is also quite easy. You get everything needed except something to drill holes for the anchors. The anchors are long enough that they work fine with rounded surfaces. I was able to stick one of the sensors on a wooden fencepost without problems. The sun shields on the sensors keep false positives to a minimum. Make sure you point the sensors downward, as recommended in the instruction, to keep late day false alarms at bay.

About the only negatives for this unit are the price (you do get what you pay for in this case) and the somewhat annoying tones for the zone alarms. Actually, I can live with both issues without problem—only a few of the tones are horribly annoying and it’s probably a good idea that they are so that I won’t breeze right through an alarm while working.

Overall, the Guardline Wireless Driveway Alarm is a high quality produce that should provide me with years of service. It is a little expensive, but that expense is more than offset by the long reception range it provides and the lack of false alarms. Just how will it ages remains to be seen.

 

Author: John

John Mueller is a freelance author and technical editor. He has writing in his blood, having produced 99 books and over 600 articles to date. The topics range from networking to artificial intelligence and from database management to heads-down programming. Some of his current books include a Web security book, discussions of how to manage big data using data science, a Windows command -line reference, and a book that shows how to build your own custom PC. His technical editing skills have helped over more than 67 authors refine the content of their manuscripts. John has provided technical editing services to both Data Based Advisor and Coast Compute magazines. He has also contributed articles to magazines such as Software Quality Connection, DevSource, InformIT, SQL Server Professional, Visual C++ Developer, Hard Core Visual Basic, asp.netPRO, Software Test and Performance, and Visual Basic Developer. Be sure to read John’s blog at http://blog.johnmuellerbooks.com/.

When John isn’t working at the computer, you can find him outside in the garden, cutting wood, or generally enjoying nature. John also likes making wine and knitting. When not occupied with anything else, he makes glycerin soap and candles, which comes in handy for gift baskets. You can reach John on the Internet at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. John is also setting up a website at http://www.johnmuellerbooks.com/. Feel free to take a look and make suggestions on how he can improve it.