Death of Windows XP?

There have been a lot of stories in the trade press about Windows XP as of late. A number of readers have written to ask about the aging operating system because they’re confused by stories from one side that say everyone is sticking with Windows XP and stories from the other that say people are abandoning it. Windows XP is certainly one of the longest lasting and favored operating systems that Microsoft has produced, so it’s not surprising there is so much confusion about it.

Microsoft is certainly putting a lot of effort into getting rid of the aging operating system and for good reason—the code has become hard to maintain. Development decisions that seemed appropriate at the time Windows XP was created have proven not to work out in the long run. Of course, there are monetary reasons for getting rid of Windows XP as well. A company can’t continue to operate if no one buys new product. It must receive a constant influx of funds to stay in business, even a company as large as Microsoft. In short, if you’re Microsoft and you want to stay in business, rather than service what has become an unreliable operating system, you do anything it takes to move people in some other direction.

On the other side of the fence are people are are simply happy with the operating system they have today. The equipment they own is paid for and there isn’t a strong business reason to move to some other platform until said equipment breaks. The reliability of computer equipment is such today that it can last quite a long time without replacement. Theoretically, based on reliability alone, it’s possible that people will continue to use Windows XP for many more years. I have such as system setup to hold my movie database and to play older games I enjoy, but I don’t network it with any other equipment and it definitely doesn’t have access to the Internet.

From many perspectives, reports of the death of Windows XP are likely premature. The latest statistics still place the Windows XP market share above 27 percent. Even when Microsoft’s support goes away on April 8th, many third party vendors will continue to support Windows XP. What Microsoft’s end of support means is that you won’t get any new drivers for new hardware or upgrades to core operating system features. However, you can still get updates to your virus protection and Windows XP will continue to operate with your existing hardware.

For most people, the question of whether to keep Windows XP around hinges around the simple question of whether the operating system still fulfills every need. If this is the case, there really isn’t any reason to succumb to the fear mongering that is taking place and move to something else. However, once your equipment does start to break down or you find that Windows XP doesn’t quite fit the bill any longer, try moving along to something newer.

As to the essential question about the level of Windows XP support I’m willing to provide for my books, it depends on the book. My system no longer has development software on it because developers have moved on to other platforms. So, if you ask me programming questions about Windows XP, I’m not going to be able to help you. To some extent, I can offer a little help with user-level support questions for a few of my older books. However, I won’t be able to cover issues that my support system doesn’t address any longer, such as connecting to a network or the Internet. In sum, even though I can offer you some level of support in many cases, I can’t continue to provide the full support I once did. Let me know about your Windows XP book support questions at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

Silent Conversation

He spoke not a word,
had nothing to say,
as we went out to work each day.

Yet he said it all,
revealed to me his mind,
that he was wise and humble and kind.

He spoke to me in riddles,
in sunsets and storms,
in billowing winds and still other forms.

We conversed in new born kittens,
using fresh mown hay,
and watching the birds so hard in their play.

The delight of a raindrop,
the rush of the wave,
filling a creek bed that snow melt gave.

In smelling the air,
odors both subtle and gross,
the churnings of nature that he loved the most.

And when the day was over,
he told me good night,
the only words spoken, made the day just right.

Copyright 2014, John Paul Mueller

Antivirus and Application Compilation

Sometimes applications don’t get along, especially when one application is designed to create new content at a low level and the other is designed to prevent low level access to a system. Such is the case with compilers and antivirus applications in some cases. I haven’t been able to reproduce this behavior myself, but enough readers have told me about it that I feel I really do need to address it in a post. There are situations where you’re working with source code from one of my books, compile it, and then have your antivirus application complain that the code is infected with something (even though you know it isn’t). Sometimes the antivirus program will go so far as to simply delete the application you just compiled (or place it in a virus vault).

The solution to the problem can take a number of forms. If your antivirus application provides some means of creating exceptions for specific applications, the easiest way to overcome the problem is to create such an exception. You’ll need to read the documentation for your antivirus application to determine whether such a feature exists.

In some cases, the compiler or its associated Integrated Development Environment (IDE) simply don’t follow all the rules required to work safely in protected directories, such as the C:\Program Files directory on a Windows system. This particular issue has caused readers enough woe that my newer books suggest installing the compiler and its IDE in a directory the reader owns. For example, I now ask readers to install Code::Blocks in the C:\CodeBlocks directory on Windows systems because installing it elsewhere has caused some people problems.

Unfortunately, creating exceptions and installing the application in a friendly directory only go so far in fixing the problem. A few antivirus applications are so intent on protecting you from yourself that nothing you do will prevent the behavior. When this happens, you still have a few options. The easiest solution is to turn the antivirus program off just long enough to compile and test the application. Of course, this is also the most dangerous solution because it could leave your system open to attack.

A safer, albeit less palatable solution, is to try a different IDE and compiler. Antivirus programs seem a little picky about which applications they view as a threat. Code::Blocks may cause the antivirus program to react, but Eclipse or Visual Studio might not. Unfortunately, using this solution means that steps in the book may not work precisely as written.

For some developers, the only logical solution is to get a different antivirus application. I’ve personally had really good success with AVG Antivirus. However, you might find that this product doesn’t work for you for whatever reason. Perhaps it interacts badly with some other application on your system or simply doesn’t offer all the features you want.

My goal is to ensure you can use the examples in my books without jumping through a lot of hoops. When you encounter problems that are beyond my control, such as an ornery antivirus application, I’ll still try to offer some suggestions. In this case, the solution truly is out of my control but you can try the techniques offered in this post. Let me know if you find other solutions to the problem at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.