VBA’s Long Lasting Viability

Microsoft has taken great pains over the years to try to kill VBA off. I’ve discussed some of the issues surrounding this effort in two previous posts: VBA and Office 2013 and VBA and Office 2013 (Part 2). Because of these efforts, a number of people have written to ask me about VBA and my book about it. The fact of the matter is that most of the examples in VBA for Dummies continue to work fine and VBA remains a viable development platform for applications. Microsoft’s efforts to move VBA developers to Visual Studio Tools for Office (VSTO) haven’t been as successful as Microsoft would like—mostly because most VBA developers have other careers and don’t want to learn how to use VSTO.

I do continue to provide updates for my book in the VBA for Dummies category of this blog. The latest such post discusses trigonometric calculations in VBA. As you find book issues, I’ll continue to address them in this blog. In addition, as time permits, I’ll discuss VBA issues in general and provide additional examples that relate to the content in my book. All I really need is your input at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com to know what sorts of content you’d like to see. Your e-mails help me decide which issues are most important to you, so please do write when you see a particular need.

Of course, the biggest question about VBA is the one I haven’t answered yet. Some people have wondered whether VBA is still a viable language for new development. The fact that even Microsoft has provided updated macros for VBA should tell you something. If there were no interest in new development, you can be sure that Microsoft wouldn’t waste time in posting macros for Office 2013. In fact, a Google search shows 122,000 hits for sites that have updated their VBA information in the last year. That’s a lot of interest in a language that Microsoft has tried so hard to kill off.

I still see VBA as the language to use when you have any sort of Office automation need—VSTO is a better choice when you actually want to extend Office functionality or define new behaviors (work that full-fledged developers normally perform). It’s incredibly easy to use and most people can learn to use the basic features quite quickly. In fact, because it’s interpreted, VBA makes a great way for people to start learning basic programming principles.

The only caveat for today is to ensure that your code doesn’t have any compatibility issues, especially if you plan to use your VBA macros with Office 365. There is a lot of old code out there that might not work with newer versions of Office. With this in mind, Microsoft has created the Office Code Compatibility Inspector (OCCI). Make sure you download as use this tool to check your code.