Beta Readers Needed for Beginning Programming with Python For Dummies

I’m starting a new book project entitled, Beginning Programming with Python For Dummies. Python is a really neat language and it’s used for all sorts of commercial tasks. The main benefits of using Python are that the code is succinct, it’s easy to read, and it’s easy to learn.

This book is intended for someone who has never written any code before. The focus of the book is to make things simple and easy to understand, so if you’re already a Python developer, you probably won’t find too much in the way of new information. Here is a list of the topics you’ll find in my book as you read:

 

  • Part I: Getting Started
    • Chapter 1: Talking to Your Computer
    • Chapter 2: Getting Your Own Copy of Python
    • Chapter 3: Interacting with Python
    • Chapter 4: Writing Your First Application
  • Part II: Talking the Talk
    • Chapter 5: Storing and Modifying Information
    • Chapter 6: Managing Information
    • Chapter 7: Making Decisions
    • Chapter 8: Performing Tasks Repetitively
    • Chapter 9: Dealing with Errors
  • Part III: Performing Common Tasks
    • Chapter 10: Interacting with Modules
    • Chapter 11: Working with Strings
    • Chapter 12: Managing Lists
    • Chapter 13: Collecting All Sorts of Data
    • Chapter 14: Creating and Using Classes
  • Part IV: Performing Advanced Tasks
    • Chapter 15: Storing Data in Files
    • Chapter 16: Sending an Email
  • Part V: Part of Tens
    • Chapter 17: Ten Amazing Programming Resources
    • Chapter 18: Ten Ways to Make a Living with Python
    • Chapter 19: Ten Interesting Tools
    • Chapter 20: Ten Libraries You Need to Know About


As you can see, this is a really useful book for the novice. By the time you complete this book, you’ll be able to perform some useful tasks with Python and you’ll be able to read other books without the usual head shaking and complete frustration. The goal isn’t to turn you into an expert, but to reduce the learning curve so that you can actually follow other texts that you might want to use.

This isn’t a platform specific book. It doesn’t matter whether you work with a Mac, Linux, or Windows. I’m looking for people from all walks of life and my only expectation is that you know how to perform essential tasks with your platform of choice, such as install applications and work as an administrator on that system.

Of course, I still want to avoid making any errors in the book if at all possible. That’s where you come into play. The biggest complaint people have about computer books is that they’re obviously written by an expert and not the people reading them. I take all of the input from the beta readers to avoid that sort of problem. In addition, beta readers often find errors that other people miss. In short, you’re an incredibly important part of the writing process.

As part of being a beta
reader, your name will appear in the book Acknowledgements (unless you
specially ask that I don’t provide it). However, one of the bigger
benefits to you is that you get to read the book free of charge and gain
the skills that it can provide for you. Imagine what learning a new
programming language can do for your career. Even if you don’t need Python
for work, you can use what you gain to create applications for your own
needs and to obtain a better understanding of how computers work. Just contact me at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com if you’d like to work with me on this project.

 

Author: John

John Mueller is a freelance author and technical editor. He has writing in his blood, having produced 99 books and over 600 articles to date. The topics range from networking to artificial intelligence and from database management to heads-down programming. Some of his current books include a Web security book, discussions of how to manage big data using data science, a Windows command -line reference, and a book that shows how to build your own custom PC. His technical editing skills have helped over more than 67 authors refine the content of their manuscripts. John has provided technical editing services to both Data Based Advisor and Coast Compute magazines. He has also contributed articles to magazines such as Software Quality Connection, DevSource, InformIT, SQL Server Professional, Visual C++ Developer, Hard Core Visual Basic, asp.netPRO, Software Test and Performance, and Visual Basic Developer. Be sure to read John’s blog at http://blog.johnmuellerbooks.com/.

When John isn’t working at the computer, you can find him outside in the garden, cutting wood, or generally enjoying nature. John also likes making wine and knitting. When not occupied with anything else, he makes glycerin soap and candles, which comes in handy for gift baskets. You can reach John on the Internet at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. John is also setting up a website at http://www.johnmuellerbooks.com/. Feel free to take a look and make suggestions on how he can improve it.