Extending the Horizons of Computer Technology

OK, I’ll admit it—at one time I was a hardware guy. I still enjoy working with hardware from time-to-time and it’s my love of hardware that helps me see the almost infinite possibilities for extending computer technology to do all sorts of things that we can’t even envision right now. The fact that computers are simply devices for performing calculations really, really fast doesn’t actually matter. The sources of data input do matter, however. As computer technology has progressed, the number of sensor sources available to perform data input have soared. It’s the reason I recently wrote an article entitled, Tools to Help You Write Apps That Use Sensors.

The sensors you can connect to a computer today can do just about any task imaginable. You can detect everything from solar flares to microscopic animals. Sensors can hear specific sounds (such as breaking glass) and detect ranges of light that humans can’t even see. You can rely on sensors to monitor temperature extremes or the amount of liquid flowing in a pipe. In short, if you need to determine when a particular real world event has occurred, there is probably a sensor to do the job for you.

Unfortunately, working with sensors can also be difficult. You don’t just simply plug a sensor into your computer and see it work. The computer needs drivers and other software to interact with the sensor and interpret the data they provide. Given that most developer have better things to do with their time than write arcane driver code, obtaining the right tool for the job is absolutely essential. My article points out some tricks of the trade for making sensors a lot easier to deal with so that you can focus on writing applications that dazzle users, rather than write drivers they’ll never see.

As computer technology advances, the inputs and outputs that computers can handle will continue to increase. Sensors provide inputs, but the outputs will become quite interesting in the future as well. For example, sensors in your smartphone could detect that you’re having a heart attack and automatically call for help. For that matter, the smartphone might even be programmed to help in some significant way. It’s hard to know precisely how technology will change in the future because it has changed so much in just the last few years.

What sorts of sensors have you seen at work in today’s world? Do you commonly write applications that use uncommon sensor capabilities? Let me know about your user of sensors at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. I’d really be interested to know how many people are interested in these sorts of technologies so that I know whether you’d like to see future blog posts on the topic.

 

Author: John

John Mueller is a freelance author and technical editor. He has writing in his blood, having produced 99 books and over 600 articles to date. The topics range from networking to artificial intelligence and from database management to heads-down programming. Some of his current books include a Web security book, discussions of how to manage big data using data science, a Windows command -line reference, and a book that shows how to build your own custom PC. His technical editing skills have helped over more than 67 authors refine the content of their manuscripts. John has provided technical editing services to both Data Based Advisor and Coast Compute magazines. He has also contributed articles to magazines such as Software Quality Connection, DevSource, InformIT, SQL Server Professional, Visual C++ Developer, Hard Core Visual Basic, asp.netPRO, Software Test and Performance, and Visual Basic Developer. Be sure to read John’s blog at http://blog.johnmuellerbooks.com/. When John isn’t working at the computer, you can find him outside in the garden, cutting wood, or generally enjoying nature. John also likes making wine and knitting. When not occupied with anything else, he makes glycerin soap and candles, which comes in handy for gift baskets. You can reach John on the Internet at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. John is also setting up a website at http://www.johnmuellerbooks.com/. Feel free to take a look and make suggestions on how he can improve it.