Keeping Your CSS Clean

It happens to everyone. Even with the best intentions, your code can become messy and unmanageable. When that code is compiled into an executable, the compiler can perform some level of cleanup and optimization for you. However, when you’re working with a text-based technology, such as Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), the accumulated grime ends up slowing your application measurably, which serves to frustrate users. Frustrated users click the next link in line, rather than deal with an application that doesn’t work as they think it should. It doesn’t take long to figure out that you really must keep your CSS clean if you plan to keep your users happy (and using your application).

Manually cleaning your code is a possibility, as is keeping your code clean in the first place. Both solutions can work when you’re a lone developer or possibly working as part of a small team. The problem begins when you’re part of a larger team and there are any number of people working on the code at the same time. As the size of the team increases, so does the potential for gunky code that affects application speed, reliability, and security negatively. In order to clean code in a team environment, you really do need some level of automation, which is why I wrote Five Free Tools to Clean Up Your CSS. This article provides good advice on which tools will help you get the most out of your application.

The cleaner you keep your code, the faster the application will run and the less likely it is to have reliability and security problems. Of course, there are many other quality issues you must consider as part of browser-based application development. Messy CSS does cause woe for a lot of developers, but it isn’t the only source of problems. I’ll cover some of these other issues in future posts. What I’d like to hear now is what you consider the worst offenders when it comes to application speed, reliability, and security problems. Let me know about your main source of worry at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.