In Praise of Editorland

A good friend of mine, who just happens to be a really good editor too, runs a blog site called Editorland. If you’re like me, you have a shelf full of books that purport to tell you how to write better. These books do provide you with the mechanics of writing better—they provide a common framework of rules that everyone follows to make writing clearer, succinct, and expressive. However, they all lack something that Editorland provides—an experienced hand.

Experience is hard to find in books, articles, or even most places online. It’s not just a matter of learning when to break the rules or to observe the rules to an extreme—being a good editor (or a good author, for that matter) consists of far more than rules. For example, creativity is a good thing, even for a journalist, but certain kinds of creative prove troublesome to an extreme. Burying the topic of a story well into the story is never a good idea and Bill lets you know about it as part of his one blog post.

Sometimes it’s a matter of when to use a hyphen or the proper spelling of a word. The blog posts cover a wide variety of topics that will interest anyone who writes and is tired of not finding good answers in the books on their shelf. The idea of Editorland is to make you a better editor (or author) in discovering how to feel your way through a topic and how to use both words and punctuation effectively. Writing is an art, no matter what sort of writing you do—it can’t be taught in the same way that an engineering discipline can be taught. Experience is the best teacher.

The best part of Editorland is that you can go back through the years of posts that Bill has created and learn quite a bit about the art of writing. The topics seem fresh, even when they were written quite some time ago. In short, if you write, give Editorland a try to see for yourself that it has quite a lot to offer.

 

Author: John

John Mueller is a freelance author and technical editor. He has writing in his blood, having produced 99 books and over 600 articles to date. The topics range from networking to artificial intelligence and from database management to heads-down programming. Some of his current books include a Web security book, discussions of how to manage big data using data science, a Windows command -line reference, and a book that shows how to build your own custom PC. His technical editing skills have helped over more than 67 authors refine the content of their manuscripts. John has provided technical editing services to both Data Based Advisor and Coast Compute magazines. He has also contributed articles to magazines such as Software Quality Connection, DevSource, InformIT, SQL Server Professional, Visual C++ Developer, Hard Core Visual Basic, asp.netPRO, Software Test and Performance, and Visual Basic Developer. Be sure to read John’s blog at http://blog.johnmuellerbooks.com/. When John isn’t working at the computer, you can find him outside in the garden, cutting wood, or generally enjoying nature. John also likes making wine and knitting. When not occupied with anything else, he makes glycerin soap and candles, which comes in handy for gift baskets. You can reach John on the Internet at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. John is also setting up a website at http://www.johnmuellerbooks.com/. Feel free to take a look and make suggestions on how he can improve it.