Obtaining an Editor for Your Web-based Application

One of the things I like most about writing code for Web-based applications is that there are so many libraries out there to make the task simple. You can stitch together libraries to create an application in only a small amount of the time required to create the same application in desktop form and the resulting application is going to be a lot more flexible. (Admittedly, the desktop application is usually prettier and can be faster.) Some time intensive tasks for desktop developers, such as creating an editor, require little or no work when creating a Web-based application. In fact, you can get a number of editors for free as described in my article, “5 Free JavaScript Libraries to Add Text Editing to Your Web Application.”

In this case, I wanted to see what was available in the way of editors. There are quite a large number of editors out there, some paid, some not. After discovering that the scope of my original article idea was too large (just editors in general), I decided to narrow the scope to just those editors that are free. After all, why pay for something you can get free unless you actually need the special features of the paid product?

Unfortunately, I still ended up with too many editors (somewhere in the neighborhood of 20). So, I decided to categorize the editors by complexity and presentation. I ended up with five major categories that span the range from simple to complex. The article contains what I think are the five best editors. Of course, your opinion may vary from mine. The point is, that you have a significant number of editors to choose from, so there is absolutely no reason to ever write code to create your own editor unless you need something truly specialized.

I’m thinking about other sorts of classes of application module for future articles. For example, it might be necessary to create an application where the user can make a simple drawing to show how something is put together or how something has failed. I actually needed such a module when trying to describe the glass panes used in the front of my wood stove not long ago and finally resorted to using paper and faxing it. The graphics module would have been easier, faster, and simpler.

What sorts of modules do you need for your Web-based applications? I’m always looking for good ideas from the people who read my material. Send me your thoughts at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

Author: John

John Mueller is a freelance author and technical editor. He has writing in his blood, having produced 99 books and over 600 articles to date. The topics range from networking to artificial intelligence and from database management to heads-down programming. Some of his current books include a Web security book, discussions of how to manage big data using data science, a Windows command -line reference, and a book that shows how to build your own custom PC. His technical editing skills have helped over more than 67 authors refine the content of their manuscripts. John has provided technical editing services to both Data Based Advisor and Coast Compute magazines. He has also contributed articles to magazines such as Software Quality Connection, DevSource, InformIT, SQL Server Professional, Visual C++ Developer, Hard Core Visual Basic, asp.netPRO, Software Test and Performance, and Visual Basic Developer. Be sure to read John’s blog at http://blog.johnmuellerbooks.com/. When John isn’t working at the computer, you can find him outside in the garden, cutting wood, or generally enjoying nature. John also likes making wine and knitting. When not occupied with anything else, he makes glycerin soap and candles, which comes in handy for gift baskets. You can reach John on the Internet at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. John is also setting up a website at http://www.johnmuellerbooks.com/. Feel free to take a look and make suggestions on how he can improve it.