Extra File in Entity Framework Book Downloadable Source

At least one reader has noted that there is an extra file in the Databases.zip file which is part of the downloadable source for Microsoft ADO.NET Entity Framework Step by Step. The Rewards2 RowVersion.mdf file isn’t used by any of the examples in the book. This was a test file that I used for experimentation purposes and you can safely delete it or simply ignore it. You certainly don’t need to install it in SQL Server. I had actually forgotten about that file and uploaded it with the rest of the downloadable source. I’m sorry about any confusion that the extra file has caused. Please let me know if you have any questions about it at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

3D Printing Technology Safety

A number of people have written to comment about the Thinking About 3D Printing Technology post. Obviously, I still have a lot to learn about this technology and some of your questions have taken me quite by surprise (I’ll address some of them later, after I have conducted more research). I always appreciate it when you make me think through the topics I post because the conclusions I reach often make great fodder for book topics.

The one question that didn’t take me by surprise was one of safety. After all, it’s important to know that the output you create is safe. At the time I wrote that post, there was little on the topic of safety, which is why I didn’t include any sort of safety information. A recent article entitled, “3D-Printed Medical Devices Spark FDA Evaluation” tells that the issue of safety is on a lot of other people’s minds as well. The problem for the FDA is that it can’t actually test a printed medical device in any meaningful way and still allow a hospital to use the device in a reasonable time frame (such as in an emergency room), so it allows use of these printed devices on the basis of similarity to devices it has tested thoroughly. In other words, the printed output must match an existing device, except that it provides a custom fit for a particular patient.

I thought about that article for quite some time. It seems to tell me that the FDA is reviewing the issue of safety, but hasn’t come to any final conclusions yet. What I’m trying to do is weigh articles like this one against other articles that decry the complexity and problems of using 3D printing technology. For example, 3D printing: Don’t believe the hype states outright that many of the plastics used for 3D printers aren’t even food safe. I’m assuming that the FDA requires hospitals that rely on this technology to use the correct, safe, materials. Even so, the article does make one wonder about the safety of the materials provided for consumer-level products. Not many people will be able to afford a hospital grade device.

Safety extends beyond the end product, however, and this is where a true scarcity of information occurs. For example, when you melt some plastics, the process produces Hydrogen Cyanide (HCN), which is an extremely dangerous gas. I thought it fortunate that I found an article on the topic entitled, “Is 3D Printing Safe?” The short answer to seems to be yes, 3D printing is relatively safe, but you’ll want to ensure you have proper ventilation when doing so.

This whole issue of safety does concern me because new technologies often have hidden safety issues that are later corrected after someone encounters them (usually with unfortunate results). Like any tool, a 3D printer isn’t a toy—it is a device for creating some type of specific output. For the most part, I’d recommend against letting children use such a device without parental supervision (preferably by a parent who has actually read the manual).  I’d like to hear more of your concerns about 3D printing at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

Every Year is a Good and a Bad Year (Part 2)

Each year is different. It’s one of the things I like best about gardening and working in the orchard. You never quite know what is going to do well. It’s possible to do absolutely everything right (or wrong) and still end up with a mystery result. In the original Every Year is a Good and a Bad Year post, we had a combination of personal events conspire to derail the garden to an extent, yet we still ended up with an amazing crop of some items.

This year it’s a combination of personal and weather issues. We had a really wet spring and the warm weather was late in coming. After attempting to plant our potatoes twice (and having them rot both times), we decided that this probably wasn’t going to be a good potato year. In fact, a combination of wet weather in the spring, a really late frost, a few scorcher days, followed by unseasonable coolness have all conspired to make our garden almost worthless this year. (A pleasant exception has been our brassicas, which includes items like broccoli.) Of course, that’s the bad news.

The amazing thing is that our fruit trees and grape vines have absolutely adored the weather and a bit of a lack of quality weeding time. The pears are so loaded down that I’m actually having to cut some fruit in order to keep the branches from breaking. The grapes are similarly loaded. One vine became so heavy that it actually detached from the cable holding it and I had to have help tying it back into place. Nature is absolutely amazing because there is always a balance to things. A bad year in one way normally turns into a good year in another when you have a good plan in place.

We keep seeing the same lesson from nature—variety is essential. When you create a garden of your own, you absolutely must plan for a variety of items to ensure that at least some of the items will do well and your larder will stay full. Eating a wide variety of food also has significant health benefits. Although you might read articles about the “perfect” food, there is in reality no perfect food. In order to maintain good health, you need to eat a variety of foods and obtain the nutrients that each food has to offer. It seems as if nature keeps trying to teach that lesson by ensuring that some items will be in short supply during some years.

What sorts of items do you find are highly susceptible to the weather? Which items seem to grow reasonably well each year? Let me know your thoughts at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

Browser-based Applications and APIs

Both HTML5 Programming with JavaScript for Dummies and CSS3 for Dummies place an emphasis on the developer who needs to create a unique site in the shortest time possible, and yet achieve this feat with low support costs. The task might seem impossible. Both books achieve their goals by focusing on free or low cost tools, development aids, and Application Programming Interfaces (APIs). However, the API is the lynchpin that holds everything else together and makes everything work. The idea is to obtain a functional application that does everything it needs to do in an incredibly short time using resources that have been created, tested, and maintained by someone else.

My books discuss a few of the most popular APIs and provide pointers to other APIs that you might want to try. In addition, both books provide some best practices for working with APIs. However, I wanted to explore the concept of what makes a great API further, so I wrote “Avoiding Problematic API Choices.” The goal of this article is to help you weed out the great APIs from those that could actually damage data or leave your organization exposed to unwanted risk. The time saved developing an application is quickly used up when the APIs used to create that application cause support issues, so it’s best to use reliable APIs.

Using tools, development aids (such as free art), and APIs is a no brainer.  Creating browser-based applications makes it possible for your application to run anywhere and on any device. These free (or sometimes low cost) aids add extra incentive to develop browser-based applications because now you also avoid a large amount of the cost and upkeep of an application. Organizations that don’t avail themselves of these technologies will eventually be left behind, especially as the Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) phenomena becomes even more prevalent.

There are many tools, development aids, and APIs out there and I have yet to explore even a modicum of them. I can say that I’ve worked with a considerable number of the most popular offerings online, plus a few private (paid) offerings. Still, I’m looking forward to my continued exploration of this particular area of development. I find it incredibly interesting because I started out at a time when assembler was considered the state of the art (and a time saving approach to development when compared to other methods available at the time). Computers have come a long way since I began and every new day brings something exciting my way. It’s the reason I continue to pursue this technology with such diligence.

Of course, I’m always interested in hearing what you have to say. Do you see APIs as being safe and helpful, or as a source for problems in your organization? Which tools, development aids, and APIs do you use most often? Let me know your thoughts at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

Celebrating Labor Day

This has been an exceptionally hard spring and summer for us, so a time for relaxation is always welcome. Today I’m offline (I’m actually writing this on Saturday) and will likely barbecue something for my beautiful wife. We’ll play games and watch a movie (or possibly go for a walk should we feel so inclined). Today’s society is so high strung that it seems to be a requirement that people remain active all of the time, even when there really isn’t anything important to do. Yes, I could easily find something useful to do, but today I’ll relax.

I’ve written about Labor Day twice before: Labor Day, Time for Fun and Reflection and Labor Day, Eh?. Both posts expound on some important historical elements behind Labor Day. Unfortunately, this year I wasn’t able to find anything new to add to those two posts. I’m sure there must be something more to say, but sometimes it’s hard to separate fact from fiction and I didn’t want to reduce the importance of those previous posts. Actually, I’d enjoy hearing anything new you have to add on the subject that I haven’t discussed already. Just contact me, as normal, at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com or leave a comment on my blog.

No matter what else you do today, I hope you take a little time to unwind and to think about why we’re celebrating this particular day. The history behind Labor Day is important, especially in light of what is happening in labor today with the economy. The struggle for obtaining just wages and good working conditions never ends because someone is always looking for ways to get more for less.