Browser-based Applications and APIs

Both HTML5 Programming with JavaScript for Dummies and CSS3 for Dummies place an emphasis on the developer who needs to create a unique site in the shortest time possible, and yet achieve this feat with low support costs. The task might seem impossible. Both books achieve their goals by focusing on free or low cost tools, development aids, and Application Programming Interfaces (APIs). However, the API is the lynchpin that holds everything else together and makes everything work. The idea is to obtain a functional application that does everything it needs to do in an incredibly short time using resources that have been created, tested, and maintained by someone else.

My books discuss a few of the most popular APIs and provide pointers to other APIs that you might want to try. In addition, both books provide some best practices for working with APIs. However, I wanted to explore the concept of what makes a great API further, so I wrote “Avoiding Problematic API Choices.” The goal of this article is to help you weed out the great APIs from those that could actually damage data or leave your organization exposed to unwanted risk. The time saved developing an application is quickly used up when the APIs used to create that application cause support issues, so it’s best to use reliable APIs.

Using tools, development aids (such as free art), and APIs is a no brainer.  Creating browser-based applications makes it possible for your application to run anywhere and on any device. These free (or sometimes low cost) aids add extra incentive to develop browser-based applications because now you also avoid a large amount of the cost and upkeep of an application. Organizations that don’t avail themselves of these technologies will eventually be left behind, especially as the Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) phenomena becomes even more prevalent.

There are many tools, development aids, and APIs out there and I have yet to explore even a modicum of them. I can say that I’ve worked with a considerable number of the most popular offerings online, plus a few private (paid) offerings. Still, I’m looking forward to my continued exploration of this particular area of development. I find it incredibly interesting because I started out at a time when assembler was considered the state of the art (and a time saving approach to development when compared to other methods available at the time). Computers have come a long way since I began and every new day brings something exciting my way. It’s the reason I continue to pursue this technology with such diligence.

Of course, I’m always interested in hearing what you have to say. Do you see APIs as being safe and helpful, or as a source for problems in your organization? Which tools, development aids, and APIs do you use most often? Let me know your thoughts at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

Author: John

John Mueller is a freelance author and technical editor. He has writing in his blood, having produced 99 books and over 600 articles to date. The topics range from networking to artificial intelligence and from database management to heads-down programming. Some of his current books include a Web security book, discussions of how to manage big data using data science, a Windows command -line reference, and a book that shows how to build your own custom PC. His technical editing skills have helped over more than 67 authors refine the content of their manuscripts. John has provided technical editing services to both Data Based Advisor and Coast Compute magazines. He has also contributed articles to magazines such as Software Quality Connection, DevSource, InformIT, SQL Server Professional, Visual C++ Developer, Hard Core Visual Basic, asp.netPRO, Software Test and Performance, and Visual Basic Developer. Be sure to read John’s blog at http://blog.johnmuellerbooks.com/. When John isn’t working at the computer, you can find him outside in the garden, cutting wood, or generally enjoying nature. John also likes making wine and knitting. When not occupied with anything else, he makes glycerin soap and candles, which comes in handy for gift baskets. You can reach John on the Internet at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. John is also setting up a website at http://www.johnmuellerbooks.com/. Feel free to take a look and make suggestions on how he can improve it.