Designing with the Entity Framwork

A number of factors have contributed toward the evolution of the Entity Framework (a technology used to map database entities to objects used within .NET application programs). However, one of the major factors is the way in which developers work. Not all developers work in the same way and not every situation requires the same solution. With this in mind, Microsoft ADO.NET Entity Framework Step by Step helps you understand how the evolution of the Entity Framework has been affected by these factors. It points out how the alternatives provided by the Entity Framework make your job easier by increasing the flexibility of the development environment.

One of the more important evolutionary steps is the inclusion of three modeling techniques within the Entity Framework: Model First (where you create a database based on a model you define), Database First (where you generate a model based on an existing database), and Code First (where you generate a database based on the objects in an existing application without using a designer-based model). You can read about these three models and how they affect your application development in my recent article, “Choosing the Right Entity Framework Workflow.” The purpose of this article is to help you make the best choice in modeling technique for your next Entity Framework project. The article also points out the need to combine techniques at times to obtain a desired result and helps you understand some of the pros/cons of each approach. Of course, there is no wrong or right approach—simply the approach that works best for you.

The Entity Framework is a necessary technology when dealing with the complexities of a large scale development. Modeling tools make it possible to understand complex interactions with greater ease and to explain those interactions to others who might not have development experience. In addition, you use modeling tools to document how objects in an application relate to the tables and other features of a database. Knowledge like this is incredibly important when working in a team environment where team members must communicate well with each other or the project is doomed to failure. Most importantly for the developer, using a modeling technology like the Entity Framework greatly reduces the confusion that can occur when developer moves outside the comfort of a familiar development environment.

Of course, there is a lot more to be said about the Entity Framework and this article (and even my book) are really just a starting point. I always like to get the reader perspective about materials that I write. What are your experiences in using the Entity Framework? Let me know at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

Author: John

John Mueller is a freelance author and technical editor. He has writing in his blood, having produced 99 books and over 600 articles to date. The topics range from networking to artificial intelligence and from database management to heads-down programming. Some of his current books include a Web security book, discussions of how to manage big data using data science, a Windows command -line reference, and a book that shows how to build your own custom PC. His technical editing skills have helped over more than 67 authors refine the content of their manuscripts. John has provided technical editing services to both Data Based Advisor and Coast Compute magazines. He has also contributed articles to magazines such as Software Quality Connection, DevSource, InformIT, SQL Server Professional, Visual C++ Developer, Hard Core Visual Basic, asp.netPRO, Software Test and Performance, and Visual Basic Developer. Be sure to read John’s blog at http://blog.johnmuellerbooks.com/. When John isn’t working at the computer, you can find him outside in the garden, cutting wood, or generally enjoying nature. John also likes making wine and knitting. When not occupied with anything else, he makes glycerin soap and candles, which comes in handy for gift baskets. You can reach John on the Internet at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. John is also setting up a website at http://www.johnmuellerbooks.com/. Feel free to take a look and make suggestions on how he can improve it.