The Role of APIs in Application Development

More people are coming to understand that the PC will constitute just one of several devices that users will rely upon to perform daily computing tasks in the future. Articles such as, “Life in the Post-PC Era” are appearing more and more often because the trend is clear. However, unlike many people, I don’t see the PC going away completely. There really are situations where you need to size and comfort of a larger system. I can’t imagine myself trying to write an entire book on a tablet. If I did, the resulting Repetitive Stress Injury (RSI) would be my own fault. However, the higher reliability and slow rate of technological change also means that my systems will last longer and I won’t be buying them as often. In other words, I’ll continue to use my PC every day, but people won’t be making as much money off of me as I do it. This said, a tablet will figure into my future in performing research and reading technical materials that I would have used a PC to accomplish in the past.

The nature of computing today means that any application you write will need to work on multiple platforms. Users won’t want a unique application for each platform used. Unfortunately, new platforms arrive relatively fast today, so developers of most applications need some method of keeping their applications relevant and useful. Web-based applications are perfect for this use. These applications are the reason I chose to write CSS3 for Dummies and HTML5 Programming with JavaScript For Dummies. These books represent the future of common applications—those used by users every day to perform the mundane tasks of living and business.

When reading these two books, you’ll find a strong emphasis on not reinventing the wheel. In fact, a lot of developers are now finding that their work is greatly simplified when they rely on third party Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) to perform at least some of their work. The stronger emphasis on APIs hasn’t gone unnoticed by the media either. Articles such as, “How the API Movement is Transforming the Telecom Industry” describe how APIs have become central to creating applications for specific industries. In fact, you’ll find targeted articles for API use all over the Internet because APIs have become a really big deal.

I plan to write quite a lot more about APIs because I see them as a way of standardizing application developing, creating more reliable applications, and reducing developer effort in creating the mundane parts of an application. What will eventually happen is that developers will become more creative and APIs will put the art back into the science of creating applications. However, I’d like your input too. What do you see as the role of APIs in the future? What questions do you have about them? Let me know at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

Author: John

John Mueller is a freelance author and technical editor. He has writing in his blood, having produced 99 books and over 600 articles to date. The topics range from networking to artificial intelligence and from database management to heads-down programming. Some of his current books include a Web security book, discussions of how to manage big data using data science, a Windows command -line reference, and a book that shows how to build your own custom PC. His technical editing skills have helped over more than 67 authors refine the content of their manuscripts. John has provided technical editing services to both Data Based Advisor and Coast Compute magazines. He has also contributed articles to magazines such as Software Quality Connection, DevSource, InformIT, SQL Server Professional, Visual C++ Developer, Hard Core Visual Basic, asp.netPRO, Software Test and Performance, and Visual Basic Developer. Be sure to read John’s blog at http://blog.johnmuellerbooks.com/. When John isn’t working at the computer, you can find him outside in the garden, cutting wood, or generally enjoying nature. John also likes making wine and knitting. When not occupied with anything else, he makes glycerin soap and candles, which comes in handy for gift baskets. You can reach John on the Internet at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. John is also setting up a website at http://www.johnmuellerbooks.com/. Feel free to take a look and make suggestions on how he can improve it.