Where is the HTML5 Book Cheat Sheet?

A few people have now purchased HTML5 Programming with JavaScript For Dummies and one of the first questions that I’m asked is where the cheat sheet is. If you’ve purchased other Dummies books, you’ll have encountered the cheat sheet—a feature that includes quick tips for becoming productive quickly. The cheat sheet is normally printed on card stock and perforated so that you can easily remove it from the book. You place the cheat sheet where you can access it easily and provide tips for jogging your memory about content you saw in the book.

Don’t worry, the cheat sheet is still available, but now you access it online on the Dummies site. Now, before I get a bunch of e-mails yelling foul, yes there are some disadvantages to this new approach—the most noticeable of which is that you can’t remove the cheat sheet from your book and carry it around with you. I have to admit, not having the cheat sheet within easy reach wherever I am at the moment is a disadvantage. However, it used to be more of a disadvantage when I wasn’t always connected to the Internet. I thought about it recently and those occasions are rare today.

Let’s discuss the positives of an online cheat sheet. The following list provides some reasons that you’ll find the new cheat sheet really helpful (at least, these are reasons I like the new cheat sheet).

  • The new cheat sheet is available to everyone, even if you purchased an e-book version of the book.
  • I can make the cheat sheet as large as needed (within reason) to accommodate everything I think the reader might like to see (I often had to cut content from the old cheat sheets).
  • You now have access to live links as part of the cheat sheet so that all you need to do is click a link to see additional resources.
  • The new cheat sheet can’t get lost. Readers used to complain all the time that they had misplaced their cheat sheet (or someone had borrowed it).
  • The new cheat sheet won’t get worn out.

If you’re like me, you still like to have a paper copy of your cheat sheet around. To make the new cheat sheet as readable in paper form as possible, click the smallish Print link near the top of the page. You’ll see a less embellished version of the cheat sheet that will print cleanly no matter what platform you’re using. When the paper copy you have is lost, borrowed, or worn out, you can simply print a new one without having to ask anyone about it. Talk about convenient !

I’m always open to your input. What do you like or dislike about the new cheat sheet? Is there anything I can do to improve this new form of cheat sheet in the future? This is my first stab at this new format, so I really do need to know your thoughts so that I can polish my presentation to meet your needs. Let me know your thoughts at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

Author: John

John Mueller is a freelance author and technical editor. He has writing in his blood, having produced 117 books and over 600 articles to date. The topics range from networking to artificial intelligence and from database management to heads-down programming. Some of his current offerings include topics on machine learning, AI, Android programming, and C++ programming. His technical editing skills have helped over more than 70 authors refine the content of their manuscripts. You can reach John on the Internet at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.