VBA and Office 2013 (Part 2)

I had posted some comments about using VBA with Office 2013 in my VBA and Office 2013 post. This post was based on the preview and not on the released product. Even so, most of the comments in that post still hold true. If you’re working with the desktop version of the product, you’ll find that most of the examples in VBA for Dummies will still work fine. However, the book is getting long in the tooth and the last version of Office that worked absolutely perfectly with the book was Office 2003. Since that release, Microsoft has made it progressively harder to use VBA as a viable development solution for the power user, hobbyist, and even the less skilled developer.

There are some new issues for Office 2013 that you need to know about. Most notably, it appears that some people can’t even access the Templates folder any longer without resorting to a kludge. By default, Office 2013 displays the Office.com templates and hides your personal templates, which should be a real productivity killer for the enterprise environment where custom templates reign. Yes, there is a fix for the problem (just click the links I’ve provided), but the issue is that you have to apply the fix to individual systems.

The fact of the matter is that Microsoft is making it abundantly clear that it would prefer that you not write applications for Office unless you’re willing to use Apps for Office. However, the process for creating an application in this manner is hardly as straightforward or as easy as using VBA. As far as I know, the template issue only affects one of the examples in Chapter 11. Please let me know if other chapters are affected by this issue (or any other Office 2013 issue for that matter). You can use the example in Chapter 11 after you apply the fix that is provided by Microsoft or third parties for regaining access to your personal templates.

Microsoft is also making a strong push for Office 365. This online version of Office can’t use VBA in any form. Even if you have your own templates and have carefully crafted VBA macros that would run with the desktop version of the product, you’re out of luck when it comes to Office 365. If you have this version of Office, you simply can’t use my book—attempting to do so is a waste of time.

You can continue to get full support for VBA for Dummies with desktop versions of Office, but may have to resort to some special changes as Microsoft makes Office less amenable to use with VBA. Please make sure you read the VBA for Dummies posts on my blog for updates and help with both Office 2007 and Office 2010 before contacting me.

Anyone who is attempting to write VBA macros for Office 2013 is in for a rough time and I’m sorry to see an era of personal productivity through VBA enhancement passing. If you own Office 2013 and contact me regarding VBA for Dummies, I’ll provide the best help that I can to you, but this support will be necessarily limited. Thank you for your continued support of my books. Perhaps I’ll eventually write an Apps for Office book to supplant VBA for Dummies. Please contact me with any concerns you have at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

Author: John

John Mueller is a freelance author and technical editor. He has writing in his blood, having produced 99 books and over 600 articles to date. The topics range from networking to artificial intelligence and from database management to heads-down programming. Some of his current books include a Web security book, discussions of how to manage big data using data science, a Windows command -line reference, and a book that shows how to build your own custom PC. His technical editing skills have helped over more than 67 authors refine the content of their manuscripts. John has provided technical editing services to both Data Based Advisor and Coast Compute magazines. He has also contributed articles to magazines such as Software Quality Connection, DevSource, InformIT, SQL Server Professional, Visual C++ Developer, Hard Core Visual Basic, asp.netPRO, Software Test and Performance, and Visual Basic Developer. Be sure to read John’s blog at http://blog.johnmuellerbooks.com/. When John isn’t working at the computer, you can find him outside in the garden, cutting wood, or generally enjoying nature. John also likes making wine and knitting. When not occupied with anything else, he makes glycerin soap and candles, which comes in handy for gift baskets. You can reach John on the Internet at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. John is also setting up a website at http://www.johnmuellerbooks.com/. Feel free to take a look and make suggestions on how he can improve it.