Entity Framework Programmer Beta Readers Needed

Next week I’ll begin work on my 91st book, “Entity Framework Development Step-by-Step.” This technology is really exciting. Microsoft keeps improving the Entity Framework support and Entity Framework 5 is no exception. Just in case you haven’t seen it, Microsoft recently released the Entity Framework 5 release candidate through NuGet. You can read about the updated technology on the ADO.NET blog.

 

The Entity Framework is an ADO.NET technology that maps a database and its underlying structures to objects that a developer can easily access within application code. Before the Entity Framework, a developer needed to write code that directly accessed to the database, which caused considerable problems every time the database received an update. The Entity Framework helps shield applications from underlying changes in a database. You can read about the Entity Framework in more detail in the Entity Framework Overview provided by Microsoft. Microsoft also provides a support center that offers some basic Entity Framework learning tools.


The Entity Framework is amazing technology because it greatly reduces the work you need to do and even automates many of the processes used to interact with databases. My book will make performing tasks even easier. As you go through the book, you’ll see how to perform many Entity Framework-related tasks using step-by-step procedures. There won’t be any guesswork on your part. As a beta reader, you’ll be able to provide me input on when these procedures work, and when I need to work on them some more to help prevent Errors in Writing.

You may have an Entity Framework book on your bookshelf already. However, if that book is on an older version of the Entity Framework, you really do need to know about the new features that the Entity Framework provides. In addition, my book will highlight these five essential topics:

 


  • Choosing the right workflow: The main reason this topic is important is that the Entity Framework actually supports several different workflows and they’re all useful in different ways and for different projects.

  • Using LINQ to interact with the Entity Framework: LINQ presents the fastest, most efficient, and least troublesome way to perform basic tasks with the Entity Framework. Of course, this book also discusses more complex methods, but making things simple is essential for the overburdened developer today.

  • Working with Table-Valued Functions: This is a new major feature in the Entity Framework 5 that developers have been requesting for years.

  • Complete application health checking: Because you likely work in an enterprise environment, simply discussing exception handling isn’t enough. You also need to know how to deal with other application health issues, such as what to do when an application has concurrency issues or how to address speed problems. An entire part of the book is devoted to the topic of application health because more organizations than ever are paying close attention to this topic now (as evidenced by the large number of books and articles being created on the topic of Application Performance Monitoring, or APM).

  • Entity customization: Yes, Entity Framework automation is quite good and gets better with every release, but as with any other form of automation, it has limits. Automation can only address those issues that the creator of the automation originally envisioned for it. Developers have a habit of coming up with situations that the automation can’t handle, so that’s why the last part of the book discusses this issue to some degree. I’m not going to delve into this topic so deeply that you feel overwhelmed, so my treatment of the topic is unique in that it gives you a useful set of skills without burdening you with topics so complex that the information becomes buried in jargon.

As I said, I’m really excited about this book and would love to have you read it as I write it. Your input is essential to me. Let me know if you’d like to be a beta reader for this book at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

Author: John

John Mueller is a freelance author and technical editor. He has writing in his blood, having produced 99 books and over 600 articles to date. The topics range from networking to artificial intelligence and from database management to heads-down programming. Some of his current books include a Web security book, discussions of how to manage big data using data science, a Windows command -line reference, and a book that shows how to build your own custom PC. His technical editing skills have helped over more than 67 authors refine the content of their manuscripts. John has provided technical editing services to both Data Based Advisor and Coast Compute magazines. He has also contributed articles to magazines such as Software Quality Connection, DevSource, InformIT, SQL Server Professional, Visual C++ Developer, Hard Core Visual Basic, asp.netPRO, Software Test and Performance, and Visual Basic Developer. Be sure to read John’s blog at http://blog.johnmuellerbooks.com/.

When John isn’t working at the computer, you can find him outside in the garden, cutting wood, or generally enjoying nature. John also likes making wine and knitting. When not occupied with anything else, he makes glycerin soap and candles, which comes in handy for gift baskets. You can reach John on the Internet at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. John is also setting up a website at http://www.johnmuellerbooks.com/. Feel free to take a look and make suggestions on how he can improve it.