Microsoft’s New Casablanca Release

When I wrote C++ All-In-One Desk Reference For Dummies, I provided the reader with a view of C++ as a low-level language. It’s true that most developers use C++ to create command line utilities, drivers, embedded systems, libraries, and even operating systems. While I might use C++ to create a database engine, I probably wouldn’t use it to create a database application. I’d probably lean toward some combination of a procedural language such as C# or Visual Basic and a declarative language such as SQL or LINQ for the purpose. I’ve written database applications using PHP, Java, and a host of other languages, but never in C++ because C++ isn’t the optimal tool for the job. Many developers have written about the strength of C++ being the flexibility it provides to perform amazing tasks. So, I was a bit surprised to learn that Microsoft has delivered a new product codenamed Casablanca that lets C++ developers interact with the cloud using REST.

In reading the blog post announcing Casablanca, I detect a lack of direction. I understand that C++ currently lacks library support for any sort of Web service access without buying a separate third party product. However, that’s all that the blog post tells me. It doesn’t provide me with any ideas of how Microsoft sees the developer using this library. Given that some people do write C++ applications, I imagine that Microsoft envisions developers creating full-fledged applications with their product, but the intent is a mystery (and will remain so until someone at Microsoft speaks up). The last paragraph of the blog post says it all, ‘We would love to know whether you’re interested in using C++ to consume and implement cloud services, and if so, what kind of support you want in order to do so, whether “Casablanca” is on the right track, and how you’d like to see it evolve.’ Apparently, Microsoft is hoping that the development community will come up with some ideas on using this product.

Casablanca also comes with some significant restrictions. The most important of these restrictions is the platforms that support it:

 

  • Windows Vista
  • Windows 7
  • Windows 8


This means you can’t use Casablanca to create a library for all of those Windows XP users on your network. It doesn’t surprise me that Microsoft would place these platform limits on the product, but I’m wondering just how many developers will be able to use Casablanca in today’s enterprise environment for a product application. The fact that Microsoft’s Casablanca site heavily promotes its use with Azure leaves no doubt that this product is designed for the enterprise (or at least, a larger business).

Another strange limitation is that the product only supports REST. At one time, Microsoft was promoting SOAP and many Web services still rely on this protocol. In fact, it’s actually easier to create a connection to a SOAP Web service in Visual Studio than it is to create a REST connection. I’m sure that Microsoft will address this limitation at some point, but for now, this remains a problem for developers.

Casablanca does come with the usual Microsoft bells and whistles. If you buy the latest version of Visual Studio, you’ll obtain a complete set of templates that will make coding access to a REST Web service easier. I’m sure that there are developers who are working with just the supported platforms, work with Azure, and have the most recent version of Visual Studio who will absolutely love this product, but I have to wonder how many developers outside this small core group will be able to use Casablanca to do something productive.

Normally, I try to find something positive to say about new product releases, but this one has me scratching my head. I’ve downloaded Casablanca and plan to play with it some more. If there are some truly dazzling features, I’ll post an updated blog entry later. In the meantime, I’d like to hear your input. Is Casablanca an amazing new product that C++ developers must have? If so, how do you plan to use it? Let me know at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

Author: John

John Mueller is a freelance author and technical editor. He has writing in his blood, having produced 99 books and over 600 articles to date. The topics range from networking to artificial intelligence and from database management to heads-down programming. Some of his current books include a Web security book, discussions of how to manage big data using data science, a Windows command -line reference, and a book that shows how to build your own custom PC. His technical editing skills have helped over more than 67 authors refine the content of their manuscripts. John has provided technical editing services to both Data Based Advisor and Coast Compute magazines. He has also contributed articles to magazines such as Software Quality Connection, DevSource, InformIT, SQL Server Professional, Visual C++ Developer, Hard Core Visual Basic, asp.netPRO, Software Test and Performance, and Visual Basic Developer. Be sure to read John’s blog at http://blog.johnmuellerbooks.com/. When John isn’t working at the computer, you can find him outside in the garden, cutting wood, or generally enjoying nature. John also likes making wine and knitting. When not occupied with anything else, he makes glycerin soap and candles, which comes in handy for gift baskets. You can reach John on the Internet at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. John is also setting up a website at http://www.johnmuellerbooks.com/. Feel free to take a look and make suggestions on how he can improve it.