Visual Studio 11 and Windows 8

The trade press is beginning to talk about Visual Studio 11 quite a bit more often now, even though the release of the initial beta won’t even happen today (coincident with the consumer release of Windows 8). The word on the streets is that you won’t see anything too exciting or unexpected in Visual Studio 11. Yes, Microsoft is making the usual laundry list of changes, but there isn’t anything that you wouldn’t expect them to add. Here’s a quick overview of the changes that I’ve been able to glean from the various articles I’ve read:

 

  • HTML5 and JavaScript support
  • Touch application support
  • Agile application development
  • Cloud application development
  • .NET Framework 4.5 support
  • Metro interface designers
  • Devops integration (a tool designed to make it easier for administrators and developers to communicate)
  • IntelliTrace updates that make it possible to trace activity in operational applications
  • Asynchronous programming updates
  • Parallel program development
  • Improved SharePoint support


In other words, Visual Studio 11 is targeting Windows 8 and Windows Azure development. Along with these changes, there are rumors that Microsoft will simplify the IDE to make it easier to use. I just hope that they don’t bury functionality in places where you can’t find it. The Ribbon interface that Microsoft is so fond of adding to other applications does just that—making them a nightmare for power users to use, while simultaneously reducing the learning curve for the novice (the bad and the good that comes with any change).

There isn’t any mention of one of my pet peeves with Visual Studio 10, it’s voracious appetite for system resources and an unflinching desire to freeze the system. The current version of Visual Studio tends to require me to reboot my system at least once during any programming session.

Also missing from the laundry list is any mention of Silverlight, which makes me wonder whether Microsoft is putting this technology out to pasture. In addition, there was nary a mention anywhere of updated Windows Phone support. You’d think that Microsoft would be providing some updated support for Windows Phone development considering that many developers will need to support the mobile device. More and more users are augmenting their desktop systems (or replacing them entirely) with mobile devices, so Microsoft had better get on the ball.

Everything I’m reading focuses on Microsoft’s two main languages C# and Visual Basic. For example, I haven’t seen anything about F#, which appears in the current product. Of course, IronPython was orphaned quite some time ago, but the IronPython community remains alive and well (see my IronPython 2.7.1 Update post for details). This lack of information makes me wonder about the future of Microsoft’s other languages (including C++).

Of course, the updates in Visual Studio 11 and the .NET Framework 4.5 will affect applications of all sorts. During the upcoming months I’ll try to test all of the application examples in my books to determine whether there are any issues you need to know about. In the meantime, please continue to use the supported versions of Visual Studio when working through the examples in my books to ensure you have the best learning experience possible. Contact me with any concerns or observations you have about Visual Studio 11 at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com.

 

Author: John

John Mueller is a freelance author and technical editor. He has writing in his blood, having produced 99 books and over 600 articles to date. The topics range from networking to artificial intelligence and from database management to heads-down programming. Some of his current books include a Web security book, discussions of how to manage big data using data science, a Windows command -line reference, and a book that shows how to build your own custom PC. His technical editing skills have helped over more than 67 authors refine the content of their manuscripts. John has provided technical editing services to both Data Based Advisor and Coast Compute magazines. He has also contributed articles to magazines such as Software Quality Connection, DevSource, InformIT, SQL Server Professional, Visual C++ Developer, Hard Core Visual Basic, asp.netPRO, Software Test and Performance, and Visual Basic Developer. Be sure to read John’s blog at http://blog.johnmuellerbooks.com/.

When John isn’t working at the computer, you can find him outside in the garden, cutting wood, or generally enjoying nature. John also likes making wine and knitting. When not occupied with anything else, he makes glycerin soap and candles, which comes in handy for gift baskets. You can reach John on the Internet at John@JohnMuellerBooks.com. John is also setting up a website at http://www.johnmuellerbooks.com/. Feel free to take a look and make suggestions on how he can improve it.